FacebookTwitter
Hatrack River Forum Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Hatrack River Forum » Active Forums » Books, Films, Food and Culture » Favorite Classical Music Works (Page 2)

  This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2   
Author Topic: Favorite Classical Music Works
skillery
Member
Member # 6209

 - posted      Profile for skillery   Email skillery         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
...Mormon Tabernacle Choir

I like their "A Christmas Gloria" CD. It's a recording of John Rutter's Gloria. I especially like the third movement: "Quoniam tu solus sanctus." I asked my neighbor, who is in the Choir, about that recording, and he said they had a lot of fun recording it.

Posts: 2655 | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Book
Member
Member # 5500

 - posted      Profile for Book           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Any particularly favorite movements from the Faure Requiem?

PS the Faure Pavane is utterly gorgeous.

[ March 24, 2004, 02:56 PM: Message edited by: Book ]

Posts: 2258 | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Narnia
Member
Member # 1071

 - posted      Profile for Narnia           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My favorite movement is the Agnus Dei. It's so beautiful with the big French horn fanfare in the middle with the Hosanna. [Smile] Ah, I love it!

I also love the Sanctus cause the sopranos get to take the whole thing.

Posts: 6415 | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
skillery
Member
Member # 6209

 - posted      Profile for skillery   Email skillery         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I borrowed a CD of Stravinsky’s Firebird this evening on katharina’s and T.Analog.Kid’s recommendation. Unfortunately I had to sit through the first four tracks, which were from “The Song of the Nightingale.” What a cacophonous mess! The fourth movement with the mechanical nightingale was interesting with the instruments sounding like machines and the Morse code tapped out on the piano, but I was relieved when it was finally over. I really enjoyed The Firebird however. It was interesting and exciting, not music to fall asleep to. I will have to attend a live performance, and I’ll probably get my own CD if I can find one without the nightingale.
Posts: 2655 | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Richard Berg
Member
Member # 133

 - posted      Profile for Richard Berg   Email Richard Berg         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I like the combination of the last two themes: Stravinsky's sacred choral music rocks.
Posts: 1839 | Registered: May 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Book
Member
Member # 5500

 - posted      Profile for Book           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
When I was a kid we had to play Rite of Spring once. It was great, cause we didn't need to practice, on account that no one but a music scholar or critic could've known what the hell was going on. I sure didn't.

Yeah, that's my work ethic, right there.

Posts: 2258 | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
The Pixiest
Member
Member # 1863

 - posted      Profile for The Pixiest   Email The Pixiest         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I love Rite of Spring so I'd know.

But can anything top the Little Fugue?

Posts: 7085 | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
vwiggin
Member
Member # 926

 - posted      Profile for vwiggin   Email vwiggin         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I loved Kat's and Narnia's list (especially the Copland stuff).

I would add Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake to the list. As for contemporary composers, I think John William's Empire of the Sun and James Horner's Legends of the Fall & Braveheart will stand the test of time.

Posts: 1587 | Registered: May 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Book
Member
Member # 5500

 - posted      Profile for Book           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Geez, I almost forgot, the Henryck Gorecki 3rd Symphony. Now THAT is some gorgeous music.
Posts: 2258 | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ReikoDemosthenes
Member
Member # 6218

 - posted      Profile for ReikoDemosthenes   Email ReikoDemosthenes         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Pachelbel's Kanon D-dur
First Suite in E-flat for Military Band - Holst
Beethoven's 9th symphony
Overture to Candide - Bernstein
Prelude and Fugue in B-flat - Bach

and probably a few more that aren't just coming to mind right now...not to mention all the ones in this thread that I'm probably try to locate...

Posts: 1158 | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Richard Berg
Member
Member # 133

 - posted      Profile for Richard Berg   Email Richard Berg         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Curious -- what is the appeal of the infamous Kanon? It's almost as boring as Telemann. Not to mention it's not even a real canon (I doubt Pachelbel had the chops). If you like the chaconne format, there are awesome works throughout the literature.
Posts: 1839 | Registered: May 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Narnia
Member
Member # 1071

 - posted      Profile for Narnia           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I think it's just because it's one of the most played and most accessible pieces to the untrained ear. It's easy for anyone and everyone to hear, enjoy, and appreciate. That's also why Bach is widely loved by most who hear his work.

Now Bartok or Stravinsky. It takes a little effort to enjoy their stuff. [Smile]

Posts: 6415 | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Irami Osei-Frimpong
Member
Member # 2229

 - posted      Profile for Irami Osei-Frimpong   Email Irami Osei-Frimpong         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
????`ny 1,2, 4, 3rd violin sonata, and sextet opus 16.
Tchaikovsky 5th symphony and violin concerto
Beethoven's third, violin concerto, and I dig the slow movement of the seventh.
Shostakovich' 10th. It took a while to understand, but there are <i>so</i> cool themes explored.

Depending on my mood, I like energy of the Razumovsky quartets or Ravel's Tzigane.

I think that Bartok's Dance Suite is engaging and accessible.

edit:

I forgot the Prokofiev piano sonatas.

[ March 25, 2004, 11:41 AM: Message edited by: Irami Osei-Frimpong ]

Posts: 5600 | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
advice for robots
Member
Member # 2544

 - posted      Profile for advice for robots           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
We played a long piece by Hindemith in all-state band. It was quite a beautiful piece from my perspective. I wish I could have heard more of it, but I was third-chair trumpet deep in the brass section. I have no idea what it actually sounded like to the audience.
Posts: 5957 | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Rhaegar The Fool
Member
Member # 5811

 - posted      Profile for Rhaegar The Fool   Email Rhaegar The Fool         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Welcome to the Jungle: Guns n' Roses
Posts: 1900 | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
digging_holes
Member
Member # 6237

 - posted      Profile for digging_holes   Email digging_holes         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Josquin des Prez, Missa Pange Lingua and any other masses from that composer and/or era.
Posts: 1996 | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
skillery
Member
Member # 6209

 - posted      Profile for skillery   Email skillery         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I’ve been listening to Rimsky-Korsakov’s Scheherazade and Stravinsky’s Firebird during the past week, and I wish I had a background in music so that I could discuss the two works intelligently. I wish my local university had a crash course in music called Critical Listening.

Anyway, in my opinion Stravinsky’s work doesn’t quite measure up to that of his teacher. Rimsky-Korsakov’s themes are more fully realized, while Stravinsky seems to ramble.

Posts: 2655 | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
katharina
Member
Member # 827

 - posted      Profile for katharina   Email katharina         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Skillery: Here.
Posts: 26076 | Registered: Mar 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Narnia
Member
Member # 1071

 - posted      Profile for Narnia           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Stravinsky had different periods. [Smile] You need to catch some of his late late stuff and you'll be baffled at the total absence of theme. [Smile]

Actually, I think that part of the reason that Rimsky-Korsakov seemed to have more thematic development was because of the 'period' in which he was writing. Firebird is more like contemporary music and closer to The Rite of Spring (which is very un-thematic). Stravinsky's earliest stuff was quite melodic and very similar to that of RK.

The thing about both of them was their genius usage of the orchestra. Rimsky-K was so deft with the way he combined and used the intruments. He passed that on to Stravinsky I'm sure, and Stravinsky experimented quite a lot.

Anyway. My 2 bucks. [Smile]

Posts: 6415 | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
skillery
Member
Member # 6209

 - posted      Profile for skillery   Email skillery         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'll give Firebird another listen and see if I can discover some of Stravinsky's experimentation.

Thanks for the link katharina. Those courses are on sale right now. I’ll probably get the DVD set.

Posts: 2655 | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Book
Member
Member # 5500

 - posted      Profile for Book           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Isn't Firebird his most orthodox piece?
Posts: 2258 | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Narnia
Member
Member # 1071

 - posted      Profile for Narnia           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
No. Firebird was when he was beginning to get unorthodox. There is a whole bunch of music he wrote before that that's MUCH more orthodox.

The cool thing about Stravinsky is that he often imitated styles. There are several pieces that sound like Bach, or Mozart, or Schubert, or Brahms...and they are all by Stravinsky. If you listen to them, you hear 'new' stuff that those composers would never have included in their music, but the style is very similar all the same. Our music history teacher used to try to trick us by playing some of that stuff now and then and making us crazy.

[Smile]

Posts: 6415 | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Annie
Member
Member # 295

 - posted      Profile for Annie   Email Annie         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
OK, I'm a classical music tasteless bourgeoise who probably needs a lot of enlightening.

That said, I really love solo classical guitar. I have a lame Sugo music CD with nature noises, but some of the most beautiful classical guitar I've heard. My favorite is Vivaldi's guitar concerto in D. I can't find this anywhere else or in any other versions, though. All the Vivaldi CDs I find are the 4 seasons.

I'm also slowly being exposed to opera. I hate to admit this, but I find Opera Babes really nice to listen to. My favorite so far is Lackmé. Carmen is great too.

Posts: 8503 | Registered: Aug 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
human_2.0
Member
Member # 6006

 - posted      Profile for human_2.0   Email human_2.0         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Some of the classical stuff on my iPod:

Bach's Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor
Bach's Prelude and Fugue in G minor
Copland's 3rd symphony (includes Fanfare for Common Man)
Debussy's La Mer and 3 Noctunres
Everything by Vaughan Williams (ok, not everything--but notably Dona Nobis Pacem, his 5th, 6th, 7th, and 9th symphonies, Serenade to Music, 5 Variants on Dives and Lazarus--LDS hymn 284, For All the Saints--LDS hymn 82, O Clap Your Hands)

Not on my iPod and stuff I haven't yet seen posted:
Carlo Gesualdo's Moro Lasso
John Adams' Harmonielehre (I had a lesson from him [Smile] )
Samual Barber's School for Scandal
Leonard Bernstein's West Side Story
Bela Bartok's Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta
Beethoven's 2nd movement from the 7th symphony
Alan Hovhaness' And God Created Great Whales and Mysterious Mountain
Charles Ives' The Unanswered Question
Erich Wolfgang Korngold's The Adventures of Robin Hood
Gyorgy Ligeti's Lux Aeterna (made popular by the movie 2001)
Modest Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition (Enchantment readers should like this especially)
Francis Poulenc's Sonata for Clarinet and Piano (I play the clarinet, what can I say?)
Sergey Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf
Leroy Robertson's Oratorio from the Book of Mormon
Kurt Weill's Three Penny Opera (especially Mack the Knife)

Posts: 1209 | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Narnia
Member
Member # 1071

 - posted      Profile for Narnia           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
human, that's some good stuff!!

Annie, if you slog through all the gazillions of Vivaldi CDs on Amazon.com, you'll find those guitar concertos. I have CDs with one of his guitar concertos and one of his pieces for solo guitar, as well as a Mandoline concerto!! [Smile]

My favorite Vivaldi are the cello concertos.

Posts: 6415 | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
digging_holes
Member
Member # 6237

 - posted      Profile for digging_holes   Email digging_holes         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Woo hoo! Classical guitar rocks! [Big Grin]

Check out Leo Brouwer, especially his Estudios Sencillos and La Espiral eterna. Nikita Koshkin is also a very interesting composer for the guitar, though you may have more trouble finding recordings.

Just had to recommend some of my favourite stuff. [Smile]

Posts: 1996 | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
aka
Member
Member # 139

 - posted      Profile for aka   Email aka         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm so pleasantly shocked that other people also like a lot of the stuff I particularly like.

Bach's B minor mass is so great! My dad arranged three or four of the sections for piano and they are my favorite pieces to play. The Two Kyries and the Christi Elyson, and one I can't get enough of is the Qui Sedes ad Dextram Patrus or whatever. (I'm no good at Latin.) Ah, that one is so good! If I were God I think I would just so totally be flattered that such great music was inspired by me. [Smile] Bach really didn't write anything that wasn't really good. He's far and away the best composer ever.

Stravinsky rocks the house! Firebug Suite (well, we call it that, since we're all pyros in my family), Rite of Spring, and Petroushka are my favorites by him.

Beethoven's odd numbered symphonies, particularly 5 and 9 of course. Anyone else ever notice that everyone's odd numbered symphonies are best? Everything by Beethoven is good. That boy wrote some good stuff, particularly after he ceased to be encumbered by a sense of hearing.

For Holst the Planets I also add my vote.

Aaron Copeland Appalachian Spring. The very most beautiful part of this piece is the prayer near the end. It brings tears to my eyes always.

Rachmaninoff wrote some really good stuff. There's a waltz my dad used to play on the piano that's kickin.

Maurice Ravel too. I'm thinking of this thing in G that I can't remember the name of. Again it was a piece my dad played. So many weird notes that when you hear it enough to feel what they mean are just exactly perfectly right!

Khatchaturian whose name I can't spell and am too lazy to google. Violin concerto. And one I can play but I don't know what it's called. His stuff is passionate and sounds so very Russian to me though of course he's Armenian which is probably a lot different to people who know.

I love Handel's Messiah too. So add one tick mark beside that one. [Smile]

[ April 01, 2004, 01:00 AM: Message edited by: aka ]

Posts: 5509 | Registered: May 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
  This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.
UBB Code™ Images not permitted.
Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Hatrack River Home Page

Copyright © 2008 Hatrack River Enterprises Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.


Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2