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» Hatrack River Forum » Active Forums » Books, Films, Food and Culture » State secession petitions. (Page 1)

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Author Topic: State secession petitions.
Rawrain
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Petitions can be found here:
https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petitions/popular/0/2/0/

My father told me that around the time of Ron Paul's farewell to congress speech " https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q03cWio-zjk ", petitions for secessions started popping up, Texas having a whooping 117k votes while only 25k are needed.

I know just how intelligent the people here are, so I know I won't have to explain anything,

I voted my state out, and for many others to secede as well, I just don't see the federal government heading in a positive direction, what with Obama declaring war all on his own, the raid on Osama bin Laden (could've started ANOTHER war), the wars "in general", losing our military to the UN, ObamaCare, rigged elections via various sources mostly media, and of course the inability to fix a damn thing.

/That's my rant and I'm sticking to it.

-Discussion on thoughts-

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Mucus
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Good luck.
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Lyrhawn
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There's nothing like taking your ball and going home when you don't get your way.

I didn't hear a lot of secession talk in the 90s when Republicans were pushing Obamacare. I didn't hear a lot of secession talk in the aughts when Bush declared his wars. I didn't hear a lot of secession talk when Bush won despite failing to win the popular vote once, having a recount halted by the Supreme Court, and losing in an election where he was wildly unpopular.

Sure people were pissed, and there were threats to move to Canada, etc. But organized petition drives to secede? Nope.

And I don't even know what the hell that UN taking over our military nonsense is. The rest of the world seems pretty unified in throwing a hissy fit about how we use our military. We've never played well with the UN.

But if Texas wants to leave, good riddance. It'll help solve a big part of the logjam. I wouldn't mind handing over Alabama and Mississippi as well. The disposition of political power in this country is ridiculously lopsided, and if you all want to leave, it might finally mean something closer to one man one vote.

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TomDavidson
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I think those petitions work wonderfully as idiot detectors.
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AchillesHeel
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Republicans are so proud about the fact that Pres. Abraham Lincoln was a republican all those years ago. I wonder what Lincoln would think about states trying to leave the union?

Too bad we will never know.

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Hobbes
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Rawrain, is your actual intent to leave the Union (i.e. should these petitions work in a literal sense and those states seceed), or do you some how see this just as a way to send a message?

Hobbes [Smile]

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Xavier
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It's amusing to me to see the Bin Laden strike listed as a negative by a wingnut. If it was GWB who ordered that strike, it would have been considered his crowning achievement by the very same partisans.

I won't address the rest of the list, beyond mentioning the very literal face-palm it provoked.

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kmbboots
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Can we please just let them secede this time?
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Hobbes
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That one surprised me. I've seen a lot of people write it off as having nothing to do with Obama (and thus shouldn't be counted under his "win" column), but this is the first time I've seen anyone claim it was a sign of bad leadership.

I'm not sure who the other party in this potential war is. Pakistan? I mean I don't know who else you could mean but really, you think Pakistan might have started a war with the United States?

Hobbes [Smile]

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Strider
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I saw that I think it was Austin made a petition to remain part of America and leave Texas if they seceded. :-)
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Blayne Bradley
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Clearly they need to be reminded of the landmark decisive legal case of Sherman vs. Atlanta.
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BlackBlade
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quote:
Originally posted by kmbboots:
Can we please just let them secede this time?

Heck no. When they become a filthy countries of base lawlessness, guess who is going to have to foot the bill?
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Rawrain
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Considering all the open petitions, small chance any of those there would be taken seriously, there's actually a petition to deport everyone who signed a petition to secede... I would be satisfied with actually leaving the US, but making a point would be a lot better than nothing at all.

If a secession is successful in that without violence any state is removed from the US, it proves the US is truly a free country, otherwise I sense military intervention in the later course of things, for example military dressed civilians at peaceful protests whom open fire on nearby soldiers as a means to start a riot, and have half the state executed, cause that's how our country rolls these days.

I'm simply tired of all this bullshit.

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Blayne Bradley
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Yeah thats the second point, if they secede then there's going to be millions of people who will be oppressed and forced to leave, which has its costs unless you close the border.
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Samprimary
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from sometime around like two years ago:

quote:
Originally posted by Samprimary:
quote:
Originally posted by Rawrain:
Shoot and kill border patrol, this is America when we say don't trespass DON'T TRESPASS. Simple simple, and maybe before we deport them back to Mexico for strolling across the border we can educate them on how to do it legally ,_,

Rawrain, I'm getting the sense across the threads you participate in that you're kinda cute and real naive, like a budding libertarian in the pupal stage or something.
now we just need david attenborough to narrate rawrain's emergence from a chrysalis of privilege to have become a full-fledged libertarian in its adult phase
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Rawrain
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I am a libertarian I do change my mind a lot, but it always stays in the right direction..

Also Sam, Obama put a real stick in the mud, when he gave the majority of illegal immigrants amnesty.
I lol'ed quite hard because it included those that served in the US military, then I wonder to myself, how the hell does an illegal immigrant join our military, yes our country is quite secure and now that they're forgiven for trespassing we can arrest the remaining for identity theft and/or fraud.

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TomDavidson
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You know, you don't actually have to be stupid. You can try not to be.
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Rakeesh
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Rawrain, you're bridging away from that 'amusingly naive and privileged' sort of ignorance into less fun territory.

Re: illegal immigrants in the military-first of all, it's clear you know...well very little about the topic. Two, how much time and effort in your life have you *ever* spent in service to others, to judge what the rewards for service should be?

Finally: anyone who says they only change their mind to become more right is very much full of something, and it ain't wisdom.

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Rawrain
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Forum dwellers share a mentality just like the rather religious folks share the same mentality even with different beliefs, and as thus I avoid forums because despite his potential belief in his uniqueness there's hundreds of folks just like Sam patrolling forums everywhere, waiting to take bites out of anyone that steps too close.
-

I've kept an open mind when it comes to collecting information, but my decisions are narrow-minded , I have a version of the world I'd like to see to fruition, though it will never be exactly as I imagine it, I can give it a push in the right direction.

My main interest is making the world a better place, I'm glad I have your support hatracks finest, we can watch the world burn together :P

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AchillesHeel
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Seeing as the last time rich conservatives threw such a tantrum over not getting their way it actually did end in quite a lot of things and people being burned...

Feel free to make a Meetup group, I'll bring the cookies.

[ November 26, 2012, 12:51 PM: Message edited by: AchillesHeel ]

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Blayne Bradley
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Rawrain, secession is entirely illegal under the US Constitution and has no bearing as to what makes the US a free or not free country. If you want something akin to an objective judge try freedom house.

The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordanance, along with the other case of Texas v. White along with statements from Justice Scalia all pretty say the same thing; the Civil War decided that matter with finality, secession will never be legal in the United States unless they succeed with military force.

quote:

In accepting original jurisdiction, the court ruled that Texas had remained a state ever since it first joined the Union, despite its joining the Confederate States of America and its being under military rule at the time of the decision in the case. In deciding the merits of the bond issue, the court further held that the Constitution did not permit states to unilaterally secede from the United States, and that the ordinances of secession, and all the acts of the legislatures within seceding states intended to give effect to such ordinances, were "absolutely null".

The Supreme Court likely will refuse to even hear the case, even if they did hear it, they tend to side with the Federal government 80% of the time.
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Rawrain
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Blayne, you're doing it right.
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Samprimary
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quote:
Originally posted by Rawrain:
Forum dwellers share a mentality just like the rather religious folks share the same mentality even with different beliefs, and as thus I avoid forums because despite his potential belief in his uniqueness there's hundreds of folks just like Sam patrolling forums everywhere, waiting to take bites out of anyone that steps too close.

My original intended post literally was me acting like an attenborough narration about your epic migration, inevitably to crazy libertarian friendly forums that don't challenge you, because everywhere else is full of meanies that call you an idiot for espousing incredibly stupid views.
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Rawrain
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"You're an idiot." Won't lead to anywhere positive for either people.

So I am to know what it is that makes me stupid when this is the remark I receive. Thus those who say are also stupid, for having not an explanation.

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JanitorBlade
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Tom: You know better. Knock it off please.

Samprimary: Less talking about posters as being in the larval/pupal stage of some undesireable state if you please. It's degrading.

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TomDavidson
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Rawrain: you are wrong in every detail, and secession would be a very bad idea for almost every state in the Union. What would you like to have explained to you?
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Rawrain
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Presume, at least a 5th of the current states secede, other countries like China and Russia DO NOT get involved, list some of the most major downsides... it's a start .-.
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Bella Bee
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It keeps amazing me how much a lot of people who 'really love America' really... don't.

Also - a fifth of the states leave to form a new country together, or each one becomes a separate country? Either way, disaster, but I am interested.

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Javert
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quote:
Originally posted by Rawrain:
Presume, at least a 5th of the current states secede,

Together or individually? And which states? Just the ones with petitions, or did you have a specific few in mind?

[Edited because I'm bad at simple math.]

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Geraine
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I may be wrong, but wasn't part of the deal when Texas became a state that they could leave at any time?

Let Texas leave, bring Puerto Rico in. That way we wouldn't have to change the flag.

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Vadon
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Here's my quick non-source-cited argument against state secession.

It's a logistical nightmare. Let's pretend that ten states passed referendums to secede. I highly doubt that ten states would pass the referendums, but for the sake of the argument, imagine that they passed. I think it's entirely without question that the referendum would not be unanimous.

Let's pretend that in those ten states the "secede" vote only got 60%. What happens to that 40% of voters who didn't want to secede? Are they free to leave and move to another state? Why should they leave if they've lived there for generations? They have family, friends, a job, a mortgage, memories, etc.

Speaking of mortgages, how will businesses operate? What about all those mortgages in seceding states that were offered by FDIC insured banks? If you're in a state that has seceded, you are no longer tied to the federal government, so why would you have FDIC insurance from a government which no longer represents you?

What about all those other federal programs? Will those states create a new FDA? How will they manage their ports and airports? Will we need new passports? Are those states unifying into a single bloc as a new country? How would continental travel be affected?

What about the military? There are military bases in these states that want to secede, do they get to keep them?

What about trade relations? As a new country, you won't have trade agreements in place with other countries. What's more, it's plausible that you won't have the resources necessary to sustain the first-world comfortable lifestyle you have now.

What about our national debt? Will you take on a share of it? Part of the reason states signed on to the constitution is that the federal government holds the national debt and would absorb the state debts incurred to foreign powers. When you leave, are you willing to take your fair share of the national debt?

What if my brother lives in a state that secedes? Do I get to visit him freely? Can he visit me freely?

The short of it is this: It's a bad idea. Even if states had the freedom/right to secede, it does not make it a prudent decision to practice that right. But I will say this: These petitions for secession are the very reason that I do love this country. This is the freedom of speech taken to its greatest level of dissent. And you're free to petition this without fear of being beaten by a government goon-squad.

I'm also sympathetic to your being frustrated with the state of affairs. For full disclosure, had Governor Romney won, I would have stayed to see what his presidency shaped out to be(there was no way to tell what he'd be like from the campaign), but if I didn't like what I saw, I'd consider moving out of the country for a while. So I get the frustration. If the tables were turned, I'd probably feel much of the same frustration.

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AchillesHeel
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quote:
Originally posted by Geraine:
I may be wrong, but wasn't part of the deal when Texas became a state that they could leave at any time?

Let Texas leave, bring Puerto Rico in. That way we wouldn't have to change the flag.

Hey Texaco, oh sorry, Texas. I keep forgetting that you changed your name after you were stolen from me by people who had denounced their American citizenship, only to make you part of the U.S. It's okay, I forgive you for all those nasty things you've been saying about me. I want you to know that if you finally see the error of your ways, I'll still take you back. Whether you like it or not.

-Mexico

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Rawrain
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good list of downsides, seems more like a hassle and less of a deal breaker...
Request amnesty of debt to ownd countries, many times in the past this has been done with foreign countries in order to help growth, setting up trade relations with foreign countries may not be all that hard, but I see it being circumstantial to where you live, my state is a pretty heavy exporter in lead sadly..

Considering how our country currently work, we can fresh slate and just wipe out all mortgages and get rid of our current fail-banking system fed.res. .......

Perhaps similar to the UN, the US could become the United Countries of America, as our states are kinda supposed to be independent (government wise) anyways.

( I thought Romney was WORSE than Obama /: )
How about some about some upsides?


* Achilles that made me lol.

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MrSquicky
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I was curious to check out the petitions page. Oy vey, this country. I think my favorite was the petition to the White House to impeach President Obama. I kind of want to create a petition to require a test of basic civics for people to be allowed to create a petition.

Rawrain, given that you support secession, whereas as far as I can tell no one else on the thread does, wouldn't it be up to you to present the upsides?

edit:

Also, my impression of you is that English is your primary language. Is that correct? If so, I think you may want to take more time composing your posts. You come across, at least to me, as someone who is not a native English speaker.

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rivka
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quote:
Originally posted by Rawrain:
we can fresh slate and just wipe out all mortgages and get rid of our current fail-banking system fed.res. .......

Well, that answers the question of whether you are making a serious suggestion or not.
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Vadon
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In fairness, I believe there are a couple upsides to secession. The biggest of which would be, theoretically, greater accountability in your elected officials. As our nation keeps becoming more populous, any particular person's voice matters less and less. Secession would create a more localized government with a smaller population. Now, I'm not one of those who believes local government is inherently better than federal government. It can be better, but it is by no means a guarantee. A tyrant in DC can easily be replaced with a tyrant in Houston.
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Rawrain
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I have a hard time articulating my thoughts, smaller government is somewhat harder to corrupt and easier to notice when it is corrupt.. very hard to track how many senators and members of congress are being bought off by major companies, this should have been made illegal long ago, but you know.. it won't ever be.
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AchillesHeel
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quote:
Originally posted by Rawrain:
I have a hard time articulating my thoughts, smaller government is somewhat harder to corrupt and easier to notice when it is corrupt.. very hard to track how many senators and members of congress are being bought off by major companies, this should have been made illegal long ago, but you know.. it won't ever be.

We have yet to phonetically articulate the sounds I made while reading that, at least within the rules of hatrack.
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Blayne Bradley
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quote:
Originally posted by Geraine:
I may be wrong, but wasn't part of the deal when Texas became a state that they could leave at any time?

Let Texas leave, bring Puerto Rico in. That way we wouldn't have to change the flag.

Completely wrong, see the court case of Texas vs White.
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MrSquicky
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quote:
Originally posted by BlackBlade:
quote:
Originally posted by kmbboots:
Can we please just let them secede this time?

Heck no. When they become a filthy countries of base lawlessness, guess who is going to have to foot the bill?
I don't know, we're talking about Louisiana and Florida here. Aren't they already in a state of filthy base lawlessness that we are footing the bill for?
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Vadon
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quote:
Originally posted by Rawrain:
I have a hard time articulating my thoughts, smaller government is somewhat harder to corrupt and easier to notice when it is corrupt.. very hard to track how many senators and members of congress are being bought off by major companies, this should have been made illegal long ago, but you know.. it won't ever be.

It depends on how you define smaller government. If you make government smaller by reducing redundancies, streamline agencies, and put more authority in few people, it's easier to corrupt the government. When you have less people you need to influence and these people have more power than before, it's far easier to get your agenda through. If you mean a smaller government by decreasing the scope and power of the government, then it may be true that there would be less harm from its corruption--but it's just as easy to corrupt those in charge. But if you decrease the power of government, you're increasing the power of the private sector. If you trust the free market to act in accordance with a moral code, then I suppose this would be preferable. But the way I see it, you'd be giving power to groups who are even harder to hold accountable than government.

As for identifying corruption, it depends, again. If a person has very little power, it's hard to see them being corrupt because they can do so little as a corrupt agent. On the other hand, if you make the government smaller by decreasing the total number of people in government, it is easier to see who is corrupt. Unfortunately, while it's easier to see that they're corrupt, it's easier to see because their corruption can do far more damage.

If your concern with the government is that it's corrupt and unaccountable, secession is no guarantee that you'll get a government that is accountable. There are many smaller countries than the US with far more authoritarian governments. Their being "local" governments doesn't make it any easier to create change. Rather than focus your energy on secession, I think the better approach to take is reform.

I agree that our federal government lacks accountability. I also agree that corruption is a huge problem what with the influence of wealth interest groups in the campaign process. Secession, or even the talk of secession, won't bring about the reforms to address these problems. Talking about secession is a resignation to the status quo, not a call for reform. But I do appreciate the passion these secessionists have. Hopefully this energy can be directed into more positive venues.

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Xavier
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quote:
What about the military? There are military bases in these states that want to secede, do they get to keep them?
Yeah, I think if it ever got that far, the seceding Texans (or whoever) would be a little taken aback by the fact that they don't actually get to keep all their tanks, planes,and ships currently situated there.

Not to mention the nukes. That right there might be a deal-breaker by itself. I don't think I'd be comfortable with a new nuclear power on my doorstep.

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King of Men
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quote:
I didn't hear a lot of secession talk [back when]
So, to be fair about it, that was before you could "petition to secede" with the click of a button. Bing, your little dose of satisfied outrage for the day. When "voting to secede" costs as much as clicking a Facebook 'Like' button, it's just as meaningful: 117k Likes and a nickel will buy you a nickel's worth of coffee, which isn't very much these days.

Now, it's a bit of a problem that you can get a little dose of "ha-ha, I stuck it to the other guy" and a mean little satisfaction from making this kind of gesture with the literal click of a button; that stuff is addictive. The politics of outrage are bad enough without allowing hoi polloi to join in effortlessly; at least in the past you had to sit down and actually write your little rant to get that satisfying burst of anger. But any specific manifestation of it is worth a "meh" at most. Today the right is clicking on secession petitions, six months ago it was the left liking the Kony 2012 thing, three months from now there'll be some other fad.

When this secession thing manages to get as many people out of their comfy chairs as Occupy Wall Street did - and where are they now, by the way? - it'll be worth a raised eyebrow. Clicking on web pages? Pff.

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Samprimary
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quote:
Originally posted by Xavier:
quote:
What about the military? There are military bases in these states that want to secede, do they get to keep them?
Yeah, I think if it ever got that far, the seceding Texans (or whoever) would be a little taken aback by the fact that they don't actually get to keep all their tanks, planes,and ships currently situated there.

Not to mention the nukes. That right there might be a deal-breaker by itself. I don't think I'd be comfortable with a new nuclear power on my doorstep.

Well the seceeding southern states can keep their expanding welfare rolls and medical crises and just deal with it themselves without their federal welfare they'd been absorbing to keep afloat

(upon hearing this, the southern secessionist party suddenly freezes in place, guns still raised, as a record-scratch sound halts Bob Wills mid-croon and leaves only silence. the members glance around nervously with expanding worried frowns of dawning comprehension)

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AchillesHeel
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quote:
Originally posted by Xavier:
quote:
What about the military? There are military bases in these states that want to secede, do they get to keep them?
Yeah, I think if it ever got that far, the seceding Texans (or whoever) would be a little taken aback by the fact that they don't actually get to keep all their tanks, planes,and ships currently situated there.

Not to mention the nukes. That right there might be a deal-breaker by itself. I don't think I'd be comfortable with a new nuclear power on my doorstep.

Or the people, any active duty personnel who refuse to leave when ordered would be ordered to stand before a military court. If they run they would be international fugitives and a danger to the United States of America. If we take our military out of a place, we don't leave soldiers and the like behind just because they feel like it.

What about companies? Would they be compensated by Texaco if their property were sequestered or (heaven forbid) they did not want to operate in the newly formed country and its laws? Is it the responsibility of the remaining states to compensate the company and or corporation for every piece of land, building, equipment and projected losses due to the secession or does the responsibility lie with the seceded.

Surely this would inhibit the ability of the seceded nation/nations to successfully participate in international business. Knowing that investing in the Texacan economy may result in a complete loss of all property and fiscal assets is quite the red flag to international corporations.

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Xavier
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Some of these questions have surely been answered before, with actual balkanization in the past. I wonder how some of these things have been handled in the real world. The USSR collapse would seem to be a good first place to look.
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King of Men
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I observe that in 1860, the actual war did not start until the South fired on one of the military bases that the Union still occupied. The secession, as such, did not kick off hostilities.
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AchillesHeel
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Were there many international corporations in the USSR? Wasn't that a large problem for them as a developing modern society in contrast to Europe and North America?

Few American based companies would be willing to take active losses to help build the seceded states, and considering the entire possibility of the whole thing causing a recession that would put our recent one to shame neither would any others who profit almost exclusively from the first world.

If you knew that secession would result in a complete loss of all first world technologies (and I'm not just talking about cellphones, all of it) would you feel comfortable with seceding?

A new question, what would be the expected fallout from a seceded state? not just the ones who refuse to give up their American citizenship but those who secede and want to come back?

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Lyrhawn
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I wonder if there are any good books on what happened in the four months between secession and Ft. Sumter.

Sounds like an interesting time.

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King of Men
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quote:
Let's pretend that in those ten states the "secede" vote only got 60%. What happens to that 40% of voters who didn't want to secede? Are they free to leave and move to another state? Why should they leave if they've lived there for generations? They have family, friends, a job, a mortgage, memories, etc.
Dude, total status-quo bias. Run it the other way: Suppose a secession petition fails because 60% of the people vote against it. What happens to the other 40%? Oh right, sucks to be them. That's the nature of a democracy, or indeed of any form of public decisionmaking. Sometimes a decision goes against you and it sucks to be you. You can't make that a reason to just keep the status quo at all times.

Additionally, please observe that at the time of the American Rebellion, roughly one-third of the population were committed Loyalists and another third didn't really care about the issue. You don't hear a lot about those people, partly because the other guys won and partly because they were intimidated by mob tactics and outright terrorism. So, by your logic, the colonies should not have revolted against George III. A point I quite agree with, actually; but I suspect nobody else does. So, what exactly is different about the situation in 1779, such that "what about the minority" is not compelling? Especially since, in that case, it was actually a majority that didn't particularly want to secede.

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