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LDWriter2
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Here is a post on Laura Anne Gilman's blog. She learned an interesting technique from someone who has been here--someone who has less that a quarter of the novels out that Gilman does.

So this is interesting for us but it also shows even established pros keep learning. Talking Voices

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extrinsic
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Gilman's point to me seems a developing technique: one she has recognized but not yet fully realized. Speaking in altered vocalizations is for me a technique for developing a character or narrator's voice features, among other applications, like speaking aloud's value for hearing, tasting words as they might be read aloud and how their flow, pace, and meanings feel, and how accessible and appealing they develop.

I also believe that insights from Mehrabian's communication study apply to Gilman's voice realizations; that is, that "liking" interpersonal communication breaks down to 7 percent of the words actually communicated, 38 percent through vocalized intonation, and 55 percent through nonverbal and nonvocal gestural expression: facial as well as body posture expression. For writers, this implies that since we only have words to express meaning, we ought best pay attention to expressing how vocal intonation and body language inform the meaning of the words.

We often believe our expressed ironies are accessible by those we communicate with in our writing, but as frequently cause misunderstandings.

How to artfully express vocal intonation and body language is a matter of context and texture development. I'm currently reading Henry James' The Beast in the Jungle. Situational and extended ironies comprise a large part of the novel's meaning, and the subtext. James masterfully makes his points and ironies clear and strong, using reflector-narrator commentary to portray and evaluate--artfully and deligthfully mistakenly--vocal intonation and body language.

For an outline of the Mehrabian studies, ChangingMinds.org has an accessible overview of the studies and their imports. Mehrabian's communication studies

[ February 03, 2014, 05:21 PM: Message edited by: extrinsic ]

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LDWriter2
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Makes sense extrinsic.

I should point out though that she got the idea from one of us.

Mary Robinette Kowal has been here a time or two.

She is a puppeteer which may be where she got the idea and the talent for doing the voice thing....except for rolling her Rs of course. [Wink]

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