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Author Topic: recipes for real food, not the virtual kind
Kathleen Dalton Woodbury
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Every so often someone will mention something yummy that they have made for some occasion or other.

This topic is so they can post their recipes.

Please?


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Bent Tree
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Here is a fantastic one for the summer. I created this for a Japanese Restaurant. I call it Thai fruit soup and the syrup can be made in a large batch and stored at room temp in a mason Jar for several months. Otherwise the fruit you use is optional and you can use what is fresh and available. I will simply make a list of suitable stuff. This can be great for a quick and easy fruit salad anytime. Just pour the syrup over fresh cut fruit.

Syrup:

equal parts by volume water and granulated sugar
1 cup light Karo syrup or invert sugar.

Bring water, sugar and Karo to a simmer stiring until thoroughly dizzolved. After this point throw out the spoon. any sugar added back into the solution after dizzolved can cause the syrup to crystalize when it cools.

To this add a bundle of thai basil(no substitutions here) a few stalks of crushed lemongrass, a few star anise cloves, a pinch of allspice, (This is a good place to go through the spice rack and get all the wierd spices you never use.) A few cloves. A dozen or so black or white peppercorns.
Slice a small bulb of ginger and a lemon. Toss that in.

*Edited to say, "Oops, I forgot Cinnamon sticks. Use three or four."

Let the syrup simmer on low for an hour. then set it aside and let it cool to room temperature. Then strain it into a mason jar, and it can be stored indefinately.

I usually use:

Mango
Papya
Kiwi
Pinneapple
Starfruit(Carambola)
Orange segments(fresh)
Strawberries
Bannana

The above are the original recipe but the following can be used in addition or in any combination:

Berries of any kind
Melons and Honeydew
Grapes and apples(not my fav in this)
Peeled and quartered citrus
Any other tropical fruit I may have forgotten.

This is a great and unique way to make a fruit salad. It is great with poached meringue and also Ice cream

[This message has been edited by Bent Tree (edited March 14, 2009).]

[This message has been edited by Bent Tree (edited March 16, 2009).]


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extrinsic
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By way of consolation for disappointing Ms. Dalton-Woodbury's request for copy protected cookie recipes, here's my deviled crabcake recipe, makes eight crabcakes, serves eight appetizer portions or four entree portions;

Deviled Crabcakes

1 lb. crabmeat
1 Tbsp. butter
1/2 cup minced onion
1/4 cup minced red or green bell pepper
1/4 cup minced celery
1 cup fresh white bread cubes, about six slices with crusts trimmed away
1 egg
1 cup mayonaise
1 Tbsp. prepared yellow mustard
1 Tbsp. Worcestershire
2 Tbsp. minced parsley
1/8 Tsp. cayenne or white pepper (optional)
1 Tsp. salt
1 Tsp. dry yellow mustard
1 Tbsp. seafood seasoning
1 Tsp. baking powder

If crabmeat is wet, press excess liquid out and discard liquid. Sort crabmeat to remove undesirable shell and cartilage pieces. Set crabmeat aside in refrigerator.

Sauté minced onion, bell pepper, and celery in butter until tender. Set aside to cool.

Lightly beat egg in quart sized bowl. Add remaining ingredients except crabmeat and bread cubes and whisk until combined. Gently fold in crabmeat until well coated. Then gently fold in bread cubes until incorporated. Separate into eight equal portions and mold with hands into cakes about 3 inches in diameter and a half inch thick. Let crabcakes rest in refrigerator for fifteen minutes to set up. In olive oil heated to medium heat, sauté five minutes to a side or until golden brown. With crabcakes still in pan, deglaze sauté pan with a tablespoon of dry white wine (optional). Remove crabcakes and drizzle with deglazing drippings. Best served hot.

May be baked on an oiled sheet pan in an oven for ten to fifteen minutes at 450 degrees or until golden brown. Top each cake with a tiny butter patty before placing in preheated oven on top shelf.

May be deep fried in 350-degree frying oil, ten minutes or until golden brown. Bread crabcakes before frying by dredging in flour lightly spiced with salt and pepper. After breading, allow crabcakes to set up in refrigerator for fifteen minutes before placing in fryer.

Note, any crabmeat may be used, imported canned pasturized, fresh, frozen thawed, lump, backfin, or claw. I prefer fresh claw meat because it's more flavorful.

[This message has been edited by extrinsic (edited March 14, 2009).]


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InarticulateBabbler
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Funny how it's the guys replying, huh?

Kathleen, in honor of your recent trip:

quote:
Basbousa - Egyptian Semolina Cake

Batter

7 tbsp unsalted butter
3/4 cup superfine sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 medium eggs
12-1/2 oz (2 cups) semolina
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
3/4 cup yogurt
2 oz (1/2 cup) blanched almonds

Sugar Syrup

16 fl oz (2 cups) water
2 cups superfine sugar
1 tsp lemon juice

Preheat the oven to 375°F. Start by making the batter. In a large bowl, beat the butter, sugar and vanilla until light and fluffy. Add the eggs and beat well. Gradually blend in the semolina and the baking powder. Add the yogurt and mix well until the batter is smooth. Spread the batter into a greased 12-inch round oven=proof pan. Cut into diamond shapes and place an almond in the center of each diamond. Bake for about 35 minutes, until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.

In the meantime, make the sugar syrup: In a saucepan, bring the water and sugar to a boil, then add the lemon juice and reduce the heat. Simmer, uncovered, for 10 minutes, then remove from heat and allow to cool.

When the cake is cooked, remove it from the oven and pour the cooled syrup over the hot cake. Cool, cut and store in an airtight container.


quote:

Egyptian Meat and Okra Stew (Bamya)
This stew is very popular in Egypt. It can be prepared with either beef or lamb.

6 tablespoons unsalted butter or olive oil
2 pounds (1 kg) stewing lamb or beef, cut into 1 in cubes
2 onions, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 cup (6 ounces /185 g) peeled, seeded and chopped tomatoes
3 tablespoons tomato paste
1 cup stock (beef) or water, or as needed
2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint (optional)
salt and freshly ground pepper
1-1 1/2 pound (500-750 g) okra
Juice of 1 lemon

Preheat an oven to 325° F (165 C).

Heat 4 tablespoons butter or oil in a large frying pan over medium high heat. Working in small batches, brown meat, turning constantly, until browned on all sides, about 10 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to transfer to a baking dish or stew pot.

Over medium heat, sautéonions in fat remaining in frying pan until translucent, 8-10 minutes Add garlic, cumin, coriander, tomatoes, tomato paste, stock and optional mint. Stir well.

Pour over meat and season to taste with salt and pepper. Cover tightly and bake in preheated 325° until all liquid is absorbed, about 1 1/2 hours.

Taste and adjust the seasonings. Meanwhile, prepare the okra as directed in note above. Heat remaining 2 tablespoons butter or oil in skillet. Stir in okra. Sauté for 3 minutes, stirring gently.

When meat is finished, arrange cooked okra on top in a spoke pattern. Sprinkle lemon juice evenly over the surface. Re-cover the dish and return it to the oven. Bake for 35 minutes longer. Add stock or water if the mixture seems too dry. Serve very hot.

Serve with rice.

Tips: To cook okra so that it is not slimy, cut off the conical tip ,and soak in red wine-vinegar for 30 minutes, allowing 1/2 cup vinegar per pound. Drain, rinse and dry the okra and proceed with the recipe. Another method is to trim the tips, then put into water at a rapid boil for 2 minutes. Remove and rinse with very cold water, drain and pat dry.


quote:

Tiger Nut Sweets

200g of fresh dates, blend with small amount of water.
Add cinnamon and chopped walnuts to taste.
Shape into balls, coat in honey and add ground almonds.

Serve.


quote:

1 lb small egyptian dried fava beans, soaked overnight
3 lemons, juice of
1 head garlic, halved
salt
1 bunch scallion, trimmed
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
fresh ground black pepper


Drain the beans and place in a large saucepan.

Add 7 cups of water and bring to a boil over medium-high heat.

Reduce the heat to low and add the juice of 1 lemon, the garlic and the salt.

Cover and simmer over low heat (the beans will retain their shape only if cooked slowly) until the beans are soft-- moist but not soupy-- about 12 hours.

You should do this ideally in the crock pot.

Check occasionally and add water if the beans become dry.

Twenty minutes before serving, chop the scallions and combine with the remaining lemon juice.

Stir in the oil, season with salt and pepper, and set aside.

Discard the garlic and gently stir the lemon mixture into the beans.

Adjust seasoning.

Spoon into bowls, mash slightly.

Serve warm with pita bread.



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Kathleen Dalton Woodbury
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Wow! These all sound wonderful.

Thanks, guys.


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Andromoidus
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chocolate clusters:

six cups oatmeal
two bars of butter
seven tablespoons of cocoa
thre teaspoons vanilla
one cup milk
four cups sugar


mix butter, milk, cocoa, and vanilla in saucepan and bring to a boil, let boil for three to five minutes, mix contents into a bowl with the oatmeal. spoon out onto cookie sheet and let cool. makes a load of them. (enough to feed a family of five.)


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Robert Nowall
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Most of what I do generally gets lifted from a cookbook or other recipe source: this morning I prepared scalloped potatoes from a Betty Crocker recipe.

But I've got one thing that's my own, or at least my family's.

*****

Spaghetti with Meatballs and Sauce “Trabasso”


Ingredients:
Pasta: Ronzoni pasta (spaghetti, rotelle, rigatoni, or medium shells) (1 lb)
Sauce: Progresso Italian Tomatoes with Bayleaf (1 can)
Hunts Tomato Paste (12 oz) (3 cans)
large yellow onion (1)
sugar (2 tablespoons)
minced onion (sprinkle)
oregano (sprinkle)
garlic salt (sprinkle)
salt (sprinkle)
pepper (sprinkle)
hot Italian sausage (1 link)
water
Meatballs: beef ground chuck (2 to 3 lbs)
Progresso Italian breadcrumbs (sprinkle)
salt (sprinkle)
pepper (sprinkle)
minced onion (sprinkle)
white bread (sprinkle)
eggs (1 per lb of beef ground chuck)

Sauce:
1. Pour 1 can Progressive Italian Tomatoes with Bayleaf into large pot.
2. Set burner on medium.
3. Crush tomatoes while cooking.
4. Add 1/2 can of water, stir.
5. Add 1 can Hunt’s Tomato Paste, 1/2 can water, stir.
6. Repeat with other 2 cans of tomato paste.
7. Add salt and pepper, small amount, more pepper than salt, stir.
8. Add garlic salt, cover top of sauce, stir.
9. Add minced onion sprinkle, stir.
10. Add oregano sprinkle, stir.
11. Add 2 level tablespoons sugar, stir.
12. Peel and chop ends off large yellow onion.
13. Add large yellow onion to sauce.
14. Sprinkle pepper on top of onion in sauce.
15. Brown hot Italian sausage in pan.
16. Draing grease from hot Italian sausage (if necessary)
17. Add hot Italian sausage to pot.
18. Sprinkle oregano on top of sausage.
19. Set burner on low.
20. Stir as needed.

Meatballs:
1. Begin immediately after finishing with sauce.
2. Pour 1 egg into large bowl, scramble.
3. Add 1 lb to 1 1/2 lb beef ground chuck, mix.
4. Add salt and pepper, mix.
5. Add minced onion, mix.
6. Add Progresso Italian breadcrumbs, mix.
7. Add 1 slice white bread, broken into crumbs, mix.
8. Add more salt, pepper, minced onion, Italian breadcrumbs, if necessary.
9. Mix well.
10. Shape into balls, place in clean pan.
11. Cook in clean pan, burner on medium high, until brown.
12. Microwave for 7 or 8 minutes.
13. Drain grease from cooked meatballs.
14. Drop into sauce.
15. Repeat with remaining 1 to 1 1/2 lb beef ground chuck.

Pasta:
1. Fill large pot with water
2. Place on burner, set burner on high.
3. When water boils, add salt, 1 tablespoon per serving.
4. Add pasta as needed.
5. Cook as needed.

*****

Whew! I'm glad I had that on file...I'd've hated to have typed that all over again.


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Kathleen Dalton Woodbury
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Andromoidus, quick oats taste better in that recipe than regular rolled oats, so you might want to specify that. Also, you can add little extras like chocolate chips or candy-covered chocolates (sometimes referred to as M&M's (TM)) and that makes the clusters even more fun to eat.

Robert, on the sauce instructions 12 and 13, it says you peel and chop the ends off of the large yellow onion and then add the large yellow onion to the sauce. Do you add the onion whole, or is it chopped up, too?

And thanks for these recipes, too.


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Robert Nowall
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Whole. You don't eat it, it just flavors the sauce.

Also, lately, I've taken to using a big Vidalia sweet onion (from wherever it happens to come from, not just Vidalia, Georgia).

Also also, I notice I spelled something "Progressive" at one point when I meant "Progresso." I noticed it a couple of times over the years since I typed it out...never bothered correcting it, but I noticed it...


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Andromoidus
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thanks for the advice, Kathleen.
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Zero
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This is one that gets me by pretty often. Works like a charm too.

Ingredients:
1 Box Eggo Waffles
1 Bottle of Pure Maple Syrup
1 Toaster

Put the waffles in the toaster until crisp but not crunchy. Add in desired amount of syrup (caution: not into the toaster) then cut and eat. Oh and don't mix in the toaster itself. Serves 1 to a 100. (May require a double batch).


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Bent Tree
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I suppose this is more advice than a recipe, but it is a good 'Life recipe' I suppose.

Go out and find an ingredient which interests you. For me one of my most memorable and fond memories, besides picking blackberries the size of your thumb in the sweltering Arkansas summer is picking chantrelles which is a plethoral blessing here in the mixed forrest of North Florida.

I look forward to it at the end of every summer. Chantrelle omelettes are a morning staple when ther are baskets abound.

Roasted sweet corn veloute with she crab and chantrelles is also a legend around my culinary world. It is a soup with humble beginnings that helped me win the bronze in La Chaine des rotisseurs National Juenes Commis Rotissieur. Best chef under twenty five nearly a decade ago.

So get out and pick something in the wild or in the garden, or even the asian market. Make it your own.


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satate
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Wow Bent Tree I don't even know what chantrelles are. The only thing that grows wild here in Arizona that is edible(that I know of)is prickly pear. I never did gather up the nerve to try prickly pear jam.

Here is a recipe that was born of desperation. It became one or our family's favorite while I was growing up. My single mom had no money left and just a few things left in the pantry. She combined them and Spam and rice was born.

Sorry, I'm not going to give exact measurments because I don't know them.

2-3 eggs
2 carrots, grated
1 can of spam (if spam makes you cringe it's good with ham too)
rice (just make however much you want, enough so everyone can have a serving of it)

In an electric skillet brown spam/ham in a little oil. Sprinkle in the grated carrot. Push spam/ham to the side and break eggs into he middle and scramble them. Pour in the rice and mix. It's really good with salsa poured over the top and a green salad with ranch dressing next to it.


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extrinsic
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I used to make juniper vinegar for Christmas gifts. Picked the berries myself.

2 cups fresh, crushed juniper berries
1 gallon white cider vinegar

Berries can be crushed in a heavyduty mortar with a pestle or beaten with a hammer in a heavyduty plastic bag wrapped with a towel or lightly pulsed in a food processor.

Bring vinegar to a boil in a stainless steel or enameled stockpot (nonreactive). Remove from heat and add berries. Let cool. Decant liquid into five clear glass wine bottles, fifths. Equally portion berries into bottles and seal, cap, or cork. I used wooden dowel plugs sealed with canning wax, then tied paper wrappers over the plugs and waxed them too. Allow to steep and age for at least several weeks. I included a recipe card with the vinegar.

Juniper Vinaigrette

1/4 cup juniper vinegar, strain and discard berries
3/4 cup olive oil
1 Tbsp. Turbinado or brown sugar
1/4 Tsp. dry mustard powder
1/8 Tsp. sea salt
1/8 Tsp. cracked black pepper
pinch crushed red pepper seeds

Except olive oil, combine all ingredients in a blender and purée until incorporated. Gradually drizzle olive oil into liquid blending at purée speed as it emulsifies into a thin mayonaise consistency. Serve cold with cheese, poultry, seafood, beef, or pork. Goes great on roast beef sandwiches, Po' Boys, muffulettas, etc.

[This message has been edited by extrinsic (edited March 24, 2009).]


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Kathleen Dalton Woodbury
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I love getting these ingredient by ingredient and step by step recipes, but when I share a recipe, it tends to be a little less formally organized.

For example:

Twice-baked potatoes

Any number of leftover baked potatoes
same number of eggs, scrambled
shredded cheese
bacon, chopped ham, or some other preferred meat (or not)

cut potatoes in half lengthwise
scoop out potatoes, taking care to leave some lining the skins
mix together potato insides, scrambled eggs, and half of cheese (plus any meat if desired)
put mixture back in potato skins (there will probably be some left over, even if you pile the mixture high--but that's okay, because it's good outside of the potato skins, too)
top with remaining cheese
heat in microwave or in regular oven (broil, if you like) till cheese is melted
then serve


edited to add:
if you want to add chopped onions/chopped peppers/minced garlic, sauted in a little olive oil till clear, to the egg-potato mixture, or chopped green onions, raw, or chopped mushrooms, or chopped tomatoes, or whatever, that's cool, too

also, I like to add 1/4 cup cottage cheese per egg to eggs before I scramble them--makes them fluffy

[This message has been edited by Kathleen Dalton Woodbury (edited March 24, 2009).]


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extrinsic
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I've written, copyedited, and/or published a couple recipe books. Read quite a few. Recipe formatting is an automatic process for me, though, above is the first time I wrote down the juniper recipes. But then so is cooking. Dinner for one tonight, salad, London broil, glazed carrots, broccoli colcannon (broccoli instead of cabbage in mashed potatoes), and soda bread. Erin go bragh.

[This message has been edited by extrinsic (edited March 24, 2009).]


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Robert Nowall
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If I have the right (a) ingredients, (b) recipe, and (c) equipment, I figure I could make anything. Chemistry class training stuck with me. I generally break it down into steps-to-be-followed. (I got the spaghetti recipe from my mother, who got it from some friends---the "Trabasso" of the title---but it was me who broke it down into the above steps, which aren't even then very precise.)

Then again, after a few times, I can start to alter a recipe to my tastes. I made my first lasagne by following the Betty Crocker recipe...the second time out, I exchanged minced garlic for garlic cloves, the former being too messy to work with...then a few times later, I ditched tomatoes straight from the can for a big cup of the abovementioned spaghetti sauce and meatballs.


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Rommel Fenrir Wolf II
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take one stake, rub sea salt and black peper all over it
drop one stick of land of lakes butter in a fry pan and melt.
add salt and pepper to the melter butte,
through in the stake and cook 1 min 30 sec on both sides on high heat.

put stake on plate, thank the goddess (i do this during all 3 nights of the full moon) and eat.

RFW2nd


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Robert Nowall
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"Stake?" Metal, plastic, or wooden?
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Rommel Fenrir Wolf II
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the food kind, eather beef, bison, human, deer, moose, etc, they all work wonderfully to my tast.

RFW2nd


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MrsBrown
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Ground turkey, browned with all the fat poured off, mix in Taco Bell seasoning mix. Makes the best taco/burrito meat. Pre-shredded lettuce and cheese, or frozen-vegetable-of-your-choice and cheese; easy, yummy dinner. (Especially when hubby cooks the meat!)

One egg whipped (by hand) with a little milk, microwave for one minute. Its not great, but SOOO easy--I recommend hiding it in a sandwich with lots of cheese.


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BoredCrow
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Shredded broccoli stalks are my latest obsession.

Cut off the florets. Using a cheese grater, grate the broccoli stems. Melt a pat of butter in a frying pan, and add a chopped garlic clove. Saute the garlic in the butter for a few moments, until cooked but not too brown.
Add grated broccoli stems. Sautee for a few moments, then add a couple of tablespoons of water.
Cook until slightly browned.

I learned about this on epicurious.com. Now I just have to find something to do with all these extra broccoli florets....


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extrinsic
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Broccoli florets are a staple ingredient in brocoli colcannon. Add the florets to potatoes while boiling to make mashed potatoes. Otherwise prepare as usual. If making instant mashed potatoes, precook florets and beat in after preparing standard recipe. Yummy either way. I like to add Parmesan cheese and sour cream. Minced ham is good too.
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Meredith
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In honor of Easter, here is a recipe that came from an old friend of the family. No idea where she got it.

Sour Cream Pancakes:

1 egg
1 cup sour cream
1 cup buttermilk
1 cup flour
1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 tablespoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt

Beat egg. Stir in sour cream and buttermilk. Combine dry ingredients and add to sour cream mixture. Beat until smooth. Let stand at least 10 minutes.
Cook them the same as any other pancake.
These pancakes are so tender they literally melt in your mouth.

And, since I'm posting recipes. This recipe is from a friend of my mother's. This one is more of a Christmas recipe, but it would work for Easter, too.

Swedish Coffee Bread:

1 13-oz. can evaporated milk
13 oz. boiling water
1 envelope dry yeast
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup sugar
12 to 15 cardamon seeds finely ground (about 1/2 teaspoon)
1/2 cup shortening
6 to 8 cups of flour

Combine sugar, salt, shortening, and boiling water in very large bowl. When shortening has melted, add cardamon and evaporated milk. Cool to lukewarm. Beat in 3 to 4 cups flour and yeast (to make a sponge). Let rise to double in bulk.

Add additional flour to make a firm dough. Knead. Form into ball. Place in greased bowl. Let rise.

Form loaves (4) or small balls (boola). Brush top with oil. Let rise to double in bulk. Bake at 350 for 35 minutes for loaves, 15 minutes for boola. Just before baking is complete, brush with melted butter and sprinkle with cinnamon/sugar/ground nuts.



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Robert Nowall
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I gotta check with my parents about Easter plans...
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Unwritten
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Quinoa Cakes

Cakes
1/2 cup quinoa, rinsed and drained
1 cup chicken broth
1 egg, beaten
1/2 cup corn kernels
1/4 cup mozzarella cheese
1/4 cup whole wheat flour
2 T buttermilk or regular milk
1/4 t salt
1/4 t pepper
pinch of onion powder and crushed red pepper
2 T canola oil

Toppings:
Sour cream
Salsa

Directions

Prepare quinoa by cooking with broth in a sauce pan until it boils. Cover and cook for 15 minutes on low until the broth is absorbed. Fluff with a fork, and add remaining ingredients except for the oil.

Heat oil in a large fry pan at a medium high temperature. Scoop about 1/4 cup of the quinoa mixture at a time onto the pan and flatten with the back of a spatula. Cook about 3 minutes on each side until browned. Serve topped with salsa and other toppings as desired.


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Robert Nowall
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I'm kinda glad this popped up again...it reminded me to copy my spaghetti recipe, 'cause the disk I had it on scrambled itself...
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Kathleen Dalton Woodbury
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Thank you, Unwritten.
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