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Author Topic: Novel Support Group 12/22 - 12/28
Meredith
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quote:
Welcome to this week's Novel Support Group. Anyone can join. If you're new, tell us a bit about who you are and what project you are working on. Feel free to update the NSG Work in Progress thread with your current projects. Although we can report on any number of things, here is a list of suggestions (suggestions welcomed).


What were your goals last week and did you accomplish them?
Describe what you worked on.
Set goals for next week.
Did you learn something during this week?

Here is a list of things that you can do each week as we work on our novels (suggestions welcomed).


Writing on a novel
Characterization
World Building
Relevant research

=-=-=-=-=


As for me:

Last Week's Goals:

DUAL MAGICS SERIES (THE SHAMAN'S CURSE, THE VOICE OF PROPHECY, BEYOND THE PROPHECY,and WAR OF MAGIC): Complete at least the next step to set up a mailing list and start preparing first newsletter.
No further progress. Planning to get on this next week. [Frown]

DUAL MAGICS SERIES: As time permits, go through the x-ray listings for the Dual Magics boxed set and THE BARD'S GIFT.
Uh, yeah. Nope. [Razz]

BECOME: TO CATCH THE LIGHTNING: Keep on writing.
Yes! Only one chapter to go to THE END! [Big Grin] [Cool]

Wide Distribution Project (redux): Prepare a schedule and to-do list for removing books from Pronoun (which has announced that it's shutting down), change the back matter again, and republish through Draft2Digital. I can't actually start moving the books until after a couple of promotions have run.
Something else I'm planning to get on next week. [Frown]

OTHER:
Update my blog twice a week.
Yes. [Smile]

Next Week's Goals:

DUAL MAGICS SERIES (THE SHAMAN'S CURSE, THE VOICE OF PROPHECY, BEYOND THE PROPHECY,and WAR OF MAGIC):
Complete at least the next step to set up a mailing list and start preparing first newsletter.

DUAL MAGICS SERIES:
As time permits, go through the x-ray listings for the Dual Magics boxed set and THE BARD'S GIFT.

BECOME: TO CATCH THE LIGHTNING:
Finish and start the sequel BECOME: TO RIDE THE STORM.

Wide Distribution Project (redux):
Prepare a schedule and to-do list for removing books from Pronoun (which has announced that it's shutting down), change the back matter again, and republish through Draft2Digital. I can't actually start moving the books until after a couple of promotions have run.

OTHER:
Update my blog twice a week.

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LDWriter2
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Boy it's been way too long since I have been here.

Got back The Courier from the poofreader but yikes so many corrections and since that work is tedious it may not be 'till Feb-late that I will have it ready to publish.


Still need someone to look over Journey of Mystery

Working on the true ending for my Nano Novel Lance Starhammer. I had one ending for Nano but decided it really needed more with the build up I gave it. So far 4,000 words. I am on a week vacation and probably by done with it the week I go back to work. Then I will be needing someone to go over it. Actually all five stories are at a beta readers and I will see what he says.

I believe that is all for novels

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extrinsic
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The Little, Brown Handbook suggests writers who would improve their grammar note common errors repeated and focus on those when in revisions. Copyeditor practice does advise that every writer benefits from another set of competent eyes on any writing.

However, as a writer is ultimately responsible for and owns adjustments, accuracy, authenticity, structure, mechanics, aesthetics, etc., and any surviving errors and shortfalls, best practice is to do as much through the self's efforts as can be done before submission to an editor, proofreader, copyeditor, publication, etc.

Reconciliation of the seeming dissonance between those two entails a capacity to recognize through another's insights one's shortfalls and strengths for best effect and outcome and endeavor to advance language skills. For those ends, a writer is best advised to acquire a reference shelf of grammar, style, and usage texts, Copyeditors do; it's their stock in trade, and texts specific to the discipline. My writing reference shelves occupy a bookcase space 4 feet wide and 8 feet high. Then there's the Internet . . .

Though many style manuals also contain grammar handbook principles, they do not cover enough of the gamut. Little, Brown is most comprehensive of U.S. dialect grammar handbooks, about eight-tenths comprehensive. Also, for each style, prose, journalism, and formal writing, each discipline recommends a particular manual: Chicago, APA, MLA, CSE, Blue Book, Red Book, AP, to name a few U.S. style manuals. A few do also include publication format guidelines: Chicago, Words Into Type, though dated and a mishmash of styles, Bookmaking, most focused on publication guidance. Words Into Type is the preferred house style for many fantastic fiction digest and book publishers. None explicitly state so in their submission guidelines, though, where it would be a best practice.

What's a writer to do? What about self-publishers? How to economically choose from the fray? A comprehensive dictionary that includes synonym reference, about $40 new, ideally, one that as well comes with a digital desktop version; a grammar handbook, about $100 new; a style manual, about $60 new; a language usage guide, about $40 new; and a publication guide, varies between $30 and $150 new; each dedicated to the writer's genre, discipline, dialect, market, and publication intent, are a minimum. Used is more economical, roughly half or so of new cost. University bookstores offer bundled package deals, too, at a reduced cost compared to single-item purchases. Plus, a study plan that is not so onerous that study defeats the purpose and calling of creative writing publication endeavors.

Little, Brown provides such study guidance and as well a last leaf verso backmatter chart that distinguishes general categories of faulty language use, titled Editing Symbols. These are the dread teacher red ink chicken scratches that bloody a school paper. Such as awk, pass, and mm; respectively, awkward construction, ineffective passive voice, and misplaced modifier, among the more common suggestion marks out of eighty-some on the chart. The chart is a useful study guide itself.

Plus, a typesetter's, or proofreader's, marks chart is also advised for study as well as writer-editor correspondence. Many examples of these are available free online in PDF format. Though both evolved for print markup, they as well facilitate digital format writer-editor correspondence, regardless of software type. In my work, Word is the conventional type, and its assorted apps. WordPerfect is more user friendly than Word and sees roughly one for every four Word clients. Adobe Acrobat Reader is most user friendly, generally best for a publication's correspondence. in preparation of submitted works for publication. Reader is more or less anymore the preferred software for "galley" circulation and markup. I use all three, plus paper methods, and other digital apps, client dependent.

I've thought to post a generic version of the Editing Symbols chart, ever conscientious of copyright, and links to typesetter marks charts, the Symbols chart with references to Little, Brown sections that explicate those symbols, for Hatrack and general writer benefits and a study guide. Two charts for printout and display at a writer's workstation, or folded inside a notebook or whatever on the go, ideally, for convenient reference and use for a writer's self-editing activity.

Not too long ago, my language skills were about par for English language users, maybe somewhat above average seventh-grade level. A few years of casual study, guided in part by those above two charts, borne as much out of career necessity as escalated fascination with the discipline, and now, even if I do say so myself, am further above par than ever, and evermore further over the years to come. I'm not that bright, really, above average memory and research skills and -- well, motivation, self-motivated for my writing outcomes most of all. If I can, most anyone can improve language and written-word composition skills. It, too, is a marathon.

[ December 23, 2017, 09:56 PM: Message edited by: extrinsic ]

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extrinsic
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Realized the overall theme, metaphor, subtext, tangible and intangible dramatic movement, whatever, feature of the project on the front burner. Got it!

And, lo and behold, came up with a label for it that fits all aspects of the design and intent. Suits my mien anyway. An "archetype event" drawn from real life, even if of a non-one-to-one correspondence, and best practice of a dramatic magnitude larger than life. Narrative entails archetype characters. Why not event, and setting and milieu, archetypes, too, for that matter? Huzzah! Glory be! Oh my! Is this the last milestone hurdle overcome on my Poet's Journey?

[ December 24, 2017, 04:57 AM: Message edited by: extrinsic ]

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noelle gould
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Hello. This is my first post here in an attempt to hold myself accountable to developing a daily writing habit.

I'm working on the first book of a fiction trilogy. Its general fiction with a futuristic edge which doesn't feel easily marketable so that's got me bothered a bit. But I'll finish the 1st draft and go from there.

My goal for this week is to begin the habit of working on my book daily. Even if it ends up being only 15 minutes of research. But to sit down at the computer and work on my book every day. I'd also like to set the goal of completing at least 5 scenes this week.

Thank you for being there!

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extrinsic
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General fiction with a futuristic edge realizes an often overlooked feature of speculative fiction, the literary movement, not per se recent diluted use of the term as a convenient marketplace compass of any narrative that contains fantastic features: "science fiction, fantasy, superhero fiction, science fantasy, horror, and supernatural fiction" (Wikipedia "Speculative Fiction").

The literary device of speculative fiction generally involves a "Historiographic Metafiction" sensibility. The histriographic part entails an ahistorical perspective, some type of temporal anachrony; the metafiction, some deliberate intent to call attention to the artficiality of a fictional construct. A mechanical feature of speculative fiction is that fantastic features inform the dramatic movement of a work though could work without those and any other real-world or fantastic feature substitute instead.

Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 is a classic example of all speculative fiction's features and general fiction with fantastic futuristic features -- their anachronies, though shy on the metafiction features. Another, Audrey Niffenegger's The Time Traveler's Wife. Of less obvious features, speculative fiction's "soft" science fiction somewhat, in that fantastic social sciences features are the main dramatic movement locomotives though a subtext to the surface action's tangibility.

In any case, such considerations as the above are not at present germane. Draft completion first, then prospects for Smart subconscious plants realize a true design intent for rewrites and revisions. ("Being a Glossary of Terms Useful in Critiquing Science Fiction" by Clarion workshops' David Smith, SFWA hosted)

Futuristic literature enjoys a wider audience than essential science fiction itself, within which the marketplace generally categorizes the type, hence, potential for broad appeal. On the other hand, fantasy, too, can be more or less contemporary "urban" fantastic literature and appeal as well. Margaret Atwood notes the only true requirement for speculative fiction is that fantastic features be natural, necessary, and real-world possible, authentic anyway.

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LDWriter2
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quote:
Originally posted by noelle gould:
Hello. This is my first post here in an attempt to hold myself accountable to developing a daily writing habit.

I'm working on the first book of a fiction trilogy. Its general fiction with a futuristic edge which doesn't feel easily marketable so that's got me bothered a bit. But I'll finish the 1st draft and go from there.

My goal for this week is to begin the habit of working on my book daily. Even if it ends up being only 15 minutes of research. But to sit down at the computer and work on my book every day. I'd also like to set the goal of completing at least 5 scenes this week.

Thank you for being there!

Very Good goals for this new year
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Kathleen Dalton Woodbury
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quote:
Originally posted by extrinsic:
Realized the overall theme, metaphor, subtext, tangible and intangible dramatic movement, whatever, feature of the project on the front burner. Got it!

And, lo and behold, came up with a label for it that fits all aspects of the design and intent. Suits my mien anyway. An "archetype event" drawn from real life, even if of a non-one-to-one correspondence, and best practice of a dramatic magnitude larger than life. Narrative entails archetype characters. Why not event, and setting and milieu, archetypes, too, for that matter? Huzzah! Glory be! Oh my! Is this the last milestone hurdle overcome on my Poet's Journey?

Congratulations and best wishes on this, extrinsic.

And thanks for sharing your journey with us, so that we can learn from it, too.

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