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Author Topic: Introducing myself with a question
mithridates
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Do you ever write a story where something surreal is supposed to happen and then just get bored describing the surreal thing? This happens to me all the time with other things too. Should I pay attention to feelings like this in the hopes that the audience is bored too?
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telflonmail
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Yes, the subconscious or nonrational significance of imagery arrived at by automatism, the exploitation of chance effects or unexpected juxtapositions can be substantially monotonous, quite tiresome and downright boring. Have a pillow nearby.
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Meredith
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Welcome to the treehouse.

Make the surreal thing significant to the plot and/or the characters and maybe it'll be less boring.

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extrinsic
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Boring is an emotion. Consider emotional contexture part of a "surreal" motif. Surreality is an emotionally intense irreality: Irrealis is a grammatical mood, see Wikipedia "Irrealis Mood".

"Surrealism" is an arts movement and grammar of its own, too, predicated upon blurred distinctions between dream and reality, combines priorly contradictory aesthetics of dream and reality.

Emotion is often lacking for writing descriptions, and prose writing generally; something about social conventions insisting upon unemotional interaction stymies writers' ability to express emotion through written word. Don't make a scene. Prose does make a scene. Not to mention composition instruction across the education paradigm emphasizes impersonal, unemotional expression.

If the emotions of a scene don't make their way from writer creative vision onto the page, the writing is boring to write and boring to read. If passionately emotional irrealis, a surreal scene is lively for writer and reader.

Also, part of the challenge of emotionally appealing writing is it feels uncomfortable to do at first. Doubts arise and cause more writing dissatisfaction. Practice makes mastery.

[ November 11, 2014, 08:16 PM: Message edited by: extrinsic ]

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TaleSpinner
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I think you absolutely should pay attention to such feelings, in writing and everything else?

Enthusiasm sells - sells products, makes us listen to lecturers and TV presenters, draws us into songs.

If the writer - or the characters - are bored, the audience certainly will be.

If a topic is dry, but must be covered, the writer should find ways to enliven it - if only to make writing fun. Not easy. Writers learn to do it. Some of us learn these and other techniques here at Hatrack - so welcome.

Pat

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Lamberguesa
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Welcome mithridates, good to have you around!

Excellent question. Surreal can and should be interesting. As already mentioned, if you find yourself bored, it's highly likely your readers will be as well. It is important to analyze the cause of boredom: too repetitive, too predictable, just no unusual enough, too out of touch with reality? If you can pinpoint the source of uninterest then you can eliminate or change it.

Some question to ask yourself (via Writing Excuses): What is the coolest possible thing that could happen? What's the best thing that could happen to your characters? What is the worst thing? Is there a way you can make the best thing look like it is about to happen and instead the worst thing happens, or vice versa? Obviously, it needs to make sense and work in the context of your narrative.

Surprise goes a long way and I think even as a writer it is important to surprise yourself now and again.

-A.L.

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mithridates
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Wow good advice. I'll get started.
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Josephine Kait
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Welcome to the Hatrack Treehouse! [Big Grin]

-Lady Tiger

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