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» Hatrack River Writers Workshop » Forums » Grist for the Mill » Any Musicians out there?

   
Author Topic: Any Musicians out there?
Crystal Stevens
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Indianapolis isn't just around the block, but I was determined to experience a flute circle at least once. The Indiana Flute Circle meets once a month, and so I made the 1 1/2 to 2 hour drive to Indy to participate last Sunday. There were only 11 of us, but Gary said participation has been down. Hopefully it'll get better in the future. Most of the circle was surprised to here how far I came to join in, but it was worth it. I just wish I had the time (and gas money) to go every month.

The website said it's for those who enjoy native American flutes (NAFs) but there were other flutes there too. The shakuhachis--a Japanese rim-blown flute--were in strong evidence, and one guy played it better than I've ever heard one anywhere. Brad Young flutes were in evidence with some other well known makers including a couple of Oldman flutes.

I can't remember to exact name for them, but two guys had the huge Australian aborigine flutes that are around 4 to 5 feet long with a bore about 4 or 5 inches in diameter.

Several different kinds of percussion, two guitar players, and one grand piano added accompaniment.

It was my first time to play with such talented people, and I'm sure three or four of them were professional musicians. The best part was they encouraged me to play with them. I didn't feel intimidated but know my limitations and wanted to learn and gain experience. I was nervous at first and unsure about how my playing would be accepted, but they all made me feel right at home.

Just the day before, I'd purchased an Irish high whistle; a Susato in C. I also took along my Waltons whistle in D. One of the pros asked to play both. All I can say is "WOW!" I wish I could play even half that good. He made both whistles sound fantastic! But the Susato was definitely the better of the two even with a pro playing them. I also got to see and hear my first Irish low whistle. I was surprised how much it sounds like a midrange NAF. The workmanship was beautiful too.

When the time came to head home, four or five circle members said how glad they were I came and that my playing wasn't bad. They really seemed honest in asking when I could join them again. But with the long drive and lots of overtime this time of year at my job, I just couldn't say. Will I go back? You bet! It was a blast, and I can't wait to do it again. And I'm sure by then I'll have a drone flute and maybe another flute besides. One thing for sure; I should be more used to my new whistle when it's time to join them again.

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LDWriter2
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Wow, that does sound good even though I don't play.

One of the characters in a novel that is supposed to being critted play a penny flute and the main MC is a hand drummer.


But
quote:
I can't remember to exact name for them, but two guys had the huge Australian aborigine flutes that are around 4 to 5 feet long with a bore about 4 or 5 inches in diameter.
I know the one you are talking about if I heard the name I would know it but probably wouldn't be able to spell it.

However is that considered a flute? Or is my thinking too small when I think of flute. Or is there another Australian aborigine instrument than the one I am thinking of.

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Crystal Stevens
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quote:
Originally posted by LDWriter2:
Wow, that does sound good even though I don't play.

One of the characters in a novel that is supposed to being critted play a penny flute and the main MC is a hand drummer.


But
quote:
I can't remember to exact name for them, but two guys had the huge Australian aborigine flutes that are around 4 to 5 feet long with a bore about 4 or 5 inches in diameter.
I know the one you are talking about if I heard the name I would know it but probably wouldn't be able to spell it.

However is that considered a flute? Or is my thinking too small when I think of flute. Or is there another Australian aborigine instrument than the one I am thinking of.

It is a type of flute and probably one of the biggest in the world. I copied my post from a flute forum I'm on and since then found out the Aussie instrument I was thinking of is called something like a digidiroo? I probably flubbed the spelling something terrible. There are no holes and just one note. Everything else is done by the player to produce the sound and effect.

Something I forgot to say is that I play native America flute and have five of them in varying sizes. My smallest only has room for five holes (most NAFs have six) and is nine inches long. My largest is two feet long and considered a mid-range NAF. I can't go much larger because I have small hands. I got to see a NAF about a year ago that was at least four feet long and three inches in diameter. The holes were large enough for me to stick my index finger through them! No way would I be able to play it. LOL

The Indiana Flute Circle is centered on NAFs, and I was surprise with the different kinds of flutes from other cultures. The flute is possibly the oldest known musical instrument and can be find in almost any culture in the world.

BTW: There's no such thing as a penny flute. It's either a penny whistle or an Irish flute (I'm not positive, but I think the Irish flute is held to the side, where as penny whistles--also known as tin whistles or Irish whistles--are held verticle to play). You might want to do some online research for more info. I'm sure some whistle makers would be more than willing to answer any questions you may have. I'm just a rookie compared to what you can find online.

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LDWriter2
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Maybe it was a penny whistle.

One barely longer than your longest finger, people in medieval times played and usually got a penny in return. But a flutist on the radio talked about them, as well as others, and explained the name. The real name was something I don't recall.

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Crystal Stevens
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quote:
Originally posted by LDWriter2:
Maybe it was a penny whistle.

One barely longer than your longest finger, people in medieval times played and usually got a penny in return. But a flutist on the radio talked about them, as well as others, and explained the name. The real name was something I don't recall.

That may be considering the time period. I have no idea what a penny whistle might've looked like back then. Today most whistles are around 11" to 12" long with six holes. I haven't seen any shorter. <<shrug>>
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Kathleen Dalton Woodbury
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It's called a didgeridoo.
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Robert Nowall
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My thought, too. "Play your didgeridoo, Blue, play your didgeridoo...keep playin' till I shoot through, Blue, so play your didgeridoo."
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Crystal Stevens
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quote:
Originally posted by Kathleen Dalton Woodbury:
It's called a didgeridoo.

Yep, that's it. Thanks Kathleen [Smile] .
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InarticulateBabbler
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Crystal, I play guitar.

You might like this mix of music: Eluveitie - Inis Mona.

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Crystal Stevens
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quote:
Originally posted by InarticulateBabbler:
Crystal, I play guitar.

You might like this mix of music: Eluveitie - Inis Mona.

I'm not much into what's termed "metal" music, but I did enjoy seeing all the different instruments this band was playing. That was a transverse flute. That's any flute played from the side. NAFs and shakuhachis are played vertical much like a clarinet, and so are Irish whistles.

I'm more into new world type music and enjoy Mannheim Steamroller and Celtic Women. I also like NAF music played by Douglas Bluefeather and Bud Eaglewolf among others. I also like the Beachboys and John Denver, along with some of Olivia Newton John's early works like "Let me be There", "Xanadu", and "Hopelessly Devoted to You".

My teen years were the 60s, and I lost interest in rock & roll in the early 70s when the styles changed. That's when I went to country until it got terribly depressing and stopping listening. Now I prefer something soothing or music that lifts my spirits and makes me feel happy.

Thanks for the link though. I've never seen a band comprised of instruments like that. Just not my style of music [Smile] .

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