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Author Topic: Lost Boys - includes spoiler
Matt Shelby
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Ok, I'm sure that there are a number of threads in this forum that have been dedicated to Lost Boys, but I just finished reading it for the first time, so let's start another one. This is mostly to get some stuff off of my mind. I had read OSC before. I read the entire Ender's Game/Ender's Shadow series. Well, I admit that I haven't bought Shadow of the Giant yet as it is only in hardback, and I'm a poor college student who can't really afford to spend $20 for a non-school book...anyway, though, I wanted to sample a little of his other writing (as I had just begun reading him last year) a decided on a used copy of Lost Boys (under $5 is within my budget).

Lost Boys was probably the most emotionally difficult book I have ever read. I just saw so much of my own family, my little siblings, my mom and dad, in the characters. I'm Catholic, and though we different greatly with Mormons when it comes to theology, our reputations for large, close families are very similar. I really grew to feel a part of the Fletcher family as I read the book. I ended up picturing Stevie like one of my little brothers (one who was a year or two older than him, but the intelligence and kindness found in Stevie, as well as his shyness were right on with my brother). Then the end of the book came, Stevie was gone, and I felt like a piece of me had been taken too.

Now, I'm not one of those guys who brags about never crying, but I really don't. Most things just don't affect me in that way. Not movies or books, because I can separate them from reality. But I had become so emotionally involved in Lost Boys and with the Fletcher family (comparing it so much with my own family) that I did tear up at the end. I finished reading it last night, and I am still a bit disturbed by it. I guess my emotional involvement in it is a credit to the phenomenal writing ability of Mr. Card.

I suppose I more just needed to post this to just get it out. I've just never had an experience with a book like this (no, I wasn't one of the Harry Potter fans who was brought to tears over the unfortunate events of the end of Order of the Phoenix...that was fantasy..Lost Boys was real to me). Anyway, I appreciate anyone who reads this. No need to respond to anything unless you really want to. As I said, just needed a way to kind of vent the emotion Card evoked.

Well, I graduate in a couple weeks and have a number of papers to finish (such is the life of a philosophy major), so I suppose I should get to that. Good day to everyone.

-Matt

[ April 24, 2005, 03:36 PM: Message edited by: Orson Scott Card ]

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Orson Scott Card
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I appreciate your generous reading of the book. It's intensely personal to me. I first thought it up at a Halloween Party at Appalachian State's Watauga College, where I told it the way ghost stories are meant to be told: as if they really happened, personally, to the teller of the tale. So I incorporated element of my own family's life into the story, and made it about my oldest boy, the imaginary Scotty, named after me. The people there knew enough about me to know all the details were true - but not so much as to eliminate the possibility that I had had an oldest son whom they never knew.

Having once made it so personal, I kept it that way. It's my family in that book, and I poured everything I felt about my children and my wife (well, a lot of it, anyway) into that book.

Including imagining the death of my oldest son. Now, "Stevie" never existed; but almost all the incidents (except the obvious exceptions) were taken from the life of my firstborn, Geoffrey. I separated his personality, though, making Robbie true to Geoff's childhood extraversion - so BOTH those boys are based on him. But from the outside - I don't pretend for a moment that the book represents how he actually thought and felt about things. Still, he had that year with a horrible teacher, and a few other details.

The thing is, in writing the ending, I had to work through his death. It was devastating. I NEVER feel emotion while writing (except the trance of involvement in the story) but I sobbed my way through that last chapter so badly that it was a good thing I was a touch typist because otherwise it would never have got written.

I wasn't trying to juice the audience's emotion - in fact, I tried to show restraint. But the thing is, you can't read this book unemotionally. It simply demands too much feeling. If you don't identify with the family, then the first two-thirds of the book will be utterly boring because ... why would you care? There's nothing scary or magical about it at all. Just a family going through their lives.

And then, when the scary stuff starts happening, the book insists that you feel things that many readers simply aren't willing to feel. Consciously or un-, they say, We're not going there! and reject the book. Hate it.

That's not THEIR failure, it's mine; or maybe it's nobody's. It's just a type of book that either you are willing to open yourself to or not.

You were willing, and I thank you for that. You've seen a bit of my life from the inside out, and you didn't hate it (or me) and so I feel like in some way we became ... kin? confidants? I don't know. We've lived through something together.

Since then I've lost two children. I can't reread Lost Boys. But I did anyway, by listening to Stefan Rudnicki's delicately restrained reading of the book (which is nominated for an Audie this year). And even though I could NOT listen to the ending while driving (no reason to die for an audiobook, I always say), I also found that I could bear it. And that it was still true. That there is meaning in loving even children you don't really get to know. Children who haunt your family like ghosts because you can't really talk to them or get answers; children that you miss desperately and know that you won't see again in this life.

I'm especially grateful to know that it resonated with you as a Catholic. The idea was not to do a "Mormon" novel; I wanted people to be able to receive this book regardless of their personal beliefs. You'll notice that there is scarcely any actual Mormon doctrine in the book, and then only when it is absolutely required by the plot, so that non-LDS readers can figure out what's going on. So I'm happy indeed that what you saw was a large religious family, and found that the particular religion involved was not an issue that interfered with the story. That's how it's supposed to be read.

(In fact, ironically, I get complaints from Mormon readers who say, "If you were going to show a Mormon family, couldn't you show a GOOD Mormon family?" Which of course I resent deeply, since it's based on MY Mormon family!)

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Kent
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Matt, everyone in my immediate family has read it and all of us felt as you do now. I can't listen to "Every breath you take" by the Police without reliving certain elements of the plot. We all bawled our eyes out, and to this day it remains a book that we have a hard time talking much about. I'm not sure if knowing that there are others out there that had your same reaction is helpful, but you are definitely not alone. [Group Hug]
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Mr_Megalomaniac
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I love Lost Boys, but I don't know if I could ever read it again. And not just because of the ending. The moment of realization that Stevie was dead, I had to put down the book and I think. "No, no, no. That's so wrong." Got teary eyed, and although it made me sad, I loved the book greatly for affecting me like that. I don't know if that makes me sound cynical, but I wouldn't have changed the ending to anything else.

I really did become emotionally involved with the family. Though the other problem I had was that every time the book swithced to another member, it took me about halfway through the section to get into it, because I was so wrapped up with the previous character.

I remember thinking that I could imagine this being OSC and his family, but then I thought, nah, I'm probably looking too much into this, and I doubt he's Mormon. Since, he's a scifi writer and scifi writers have to be aethiest, it's a rule. That was quite a while ago, and I feel pretty stupid for thinking and admitting that. sigh.

I remember wanting to go in that book and beat the every loving crap out of all those characters making life a living hell for the family in there. That boss (who I thought I'd like to kill), the teacher, that crazy woman from the church, that kid who worked at the computer place, and to do unwritable things to the old man guy. (Remembering names is something I'm not good at.)

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ketchupqueen
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I got rid of my copy because it was so emotional to me. But I still check it out from the library on a regular basis, because there are times I need that cry. Having just miscarried, I probably won't read it again for a while, but when I've started pushing down those feelings and need to deal wtih them again, I know that's where I'll go; it not only helps me unlock my emotions, it's a really good story, and I would say one of my absolute favorite books, ever. (That puts it in the company of Anne of Green Gables and Little Women and others by those two authors; very high praise from me.)
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Synesthesia
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Maybe it's because I'm older, but I read it again this year and found myself completely bawling in parts, especially the line when Step was watching his children sleep and thought about how wonderful it was that they were in his life (I can't quote it exactly because I cannot find my copy of the book).
And the end of it, even though I read it before, completely crushed me because of Stevie's kindness and compassion, the death of all of those boys and Stevie's parent's loss of him. I think it's my favourite book you have written because of the themes like Step struggling to support his family and all of the things that were clawing at that little family (It sucks that a teacher that horrible actually existed! >.<)
Still, all the emotion in it really shows....

Good luck with your papers, Matt....

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Matt Shelby
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I thank everyone for the responses. I really didn't expect but maybe one or two very short, somewhat detached ones, and then I find real, heart-felt, sympathetic responses.

And Mr. Card, I really don't know why anyone would have a problem with the Mormonism included in the book, unless they had preconceived notions about it, and rejected it as unsavory even to read about without true consideration. I have theological differences with LDS, but that certainly doesn't keep me from respecting it or it's followers. That reminds me, Mr. Card, I really loved the piece you wrote after the death of Karol Wojtyla. I had actually written a shorter editorial for my university's newspaper, and really felt they had the same kind of feeling of admiration and love behind them (though the content differed). The ability to respect another's beliefs is one of the greatest gifts one can possess, and it heartens me that you, someone who I really do respect, has it.

I actually went out today and bought Maps in a Mirror (I convinced myself that not having money was no reason to stunt my intellectual growth, so why not buy another book?) and started out by reading the original short story Lost Boys, and I'm really look forward to reading some more of the short stories. In the period of a year, Mr. Card, you have become one of my favorite authors, and I'm glad that I'm exploring some of your work besides the Ender's Game books.

For now, though, I have to lay out a coherent philosophy of color. I tell you, I've loved studying philosophy, but I won't be too sad to start my study of law next year. Philosophy has been fun, but it is beginning to frustrate me on some level, and I know law is my calling. Anyway, I once again thank everyone for the kind responses. It's nice to know that I'm not alone in regards to the feelings I have for this book.

-Matt

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Leaf
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Wow..
It's crazy to see how this book effected everyone emotionally. I think I was partly immune to it's full effect, because, being 18 when I read it, well, obviously I don't have a family or children yet. But don't get me wrong, it was still very moving, and still I cried at the end. Maybe I will re-read it when I'm older and have kids so I can relate more. I know that's something strange to look forward to, but not really. What is the point of being human if not to feel things, right?
Well I'm ready...

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Alix
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I just wanted to say I had the same emotional reaction to Lost Boys. It felt like the characters were real people. I found myself praying for the characters in the book! I prayed for the dad to get a good job and make money and for the children to be happy and safe.

I was sad for days and days after I read it and I still cry about it. It felt like someone in my own family had died and that I had to go through all the stages of grieving.

Maybe those prayers I prayed will be transferred to Orson Scott Card's family or my family or some other deserving family.

Or maybe I just need therapy.

Either way it is one of the best books I have ever read. Thanks Orson Scott Card! [Wave]

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Catseye1979
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This was the last OSC book I read before finnially learning that if I started reading the book in the late evening I was forfiting any sleep that night. I remember I was emotionally dazed for the reast of the day although reading a book like that during the nighttime and and driving to school the next morning wasn't the best idea I ever had, in my state of mind I'm surprised I made it there.

But Lost Boys was a great book and one of three that so involved me into the story that I read it cover to cover without any breaks ( Lovelock and Ender's Game being the other two).

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Orson Scott Card
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Mr. Megalomaniac, I appreciate your desire to kill the wacko people making the family's life so hard. Which is why I will NEVER publish a list of names of people these characters were based on. There should not be a death penalty for being a tush flambe ... <grin>

As for the reaction of people to the Mormonness of the family - I have only had a few negative reactions from NON-Mormons - the negative reactions have been from MORMONS for failing to show a Mormon family that was perfect in every way. I have had people tell me that a GOOD Mormon family would have been warned by the Lord not to let their child succumb to such danger. A truly appalling idea, since that essentially says that anybody who has anything bad happen to them must have deserved it ... icky thought, eh?

Most Mormon readers, though, understand that it's better to tell the truth than try to create illusions of perfection. Besides, I freely admit to anyone who asks that I'm going to hell and all I'm really bucking for is to stay above the level of mass murderers; preferably I'd like one of the circles of hell where the conversation will at least be pretty good and the company won't make my skin crawl. Sinners at my own level, you know.

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Miro
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quote:
It's intensely personal to me. I first thought it up at a Halloween Party at Appalachian State's Watauga College, where I told it the way ghost stories are meant to be told: as if they really happened, personally, to the teller of the tale. So I incorporated element of my own family's life into the story, and made it about my oldest boy, the imaginary Scotty, named after me. The people there knew enough about me to know all the details were true - but not so much as to eliminate the possibility that I had had an oldest son whom they never knew.

I liked the book when I first read it, but didn't have quite the same emotional involvement that many people seem to have had with the characters. Then I read the short story as I was making my way through Maps in a Mirror. It freaked me out. I was a gullible kid in junior high (I'm still gullible, but not to the same degree) and the first person, personal narrative made me think of the possibility - did it actually happen to him? I eventually realized that wasn't the case, but I don't think any other story has ever gotten me like that.
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Mr_Megalomaniac
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quote:
Which is why I will NEVER publish a list of names of people these characters were based on.
That's probably a good idea. There are some crazy people out there. Me of which most deffintaly am not one. [Evil Laugh] [Evil] [Evil Laugh] [Evil]
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ketchupqueen
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quote:
I freely admit to anyone who asks that I'm going to hell and all I'm really bucking for is to stay above the level of mass murderers; preferably I'd like one of the circles of hell where the conversation will at least be pretty good and the company won't make my skin crawl. Sinners at my own level, you know.
Wow, that sounds fun! I aspire to earn the same level of hell as you one day. [Wink]
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0range7Penguin
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I liked the book but I am going to open that old can of worms and say that I still liked the short storie better. It's probably because I read it first and got the emotional impact from it so when I went to the storie I knew how it was going to end. It actually created a sense of dread throughout my reading of it. Maybe it will mean more to me when I am older and not 18 without a family but I can't imagine loosing any of my younger siblings. My youngest sister is ten years younger than me and I don't what I'de do if she died. Lost Boys was great.
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Dagonee
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quote:
he had that year with a horrible teacher
[Eek!] It seems almost ludicrous considering what else happens in the book, but I find this horribly disturbing. Such a person should not be left alone with children, ever, and they pay her to teach them? *shudder*

If your reaction was at all like the one in the book, you were nicer than I would have been. Or maybe not - I'm actually quite rational once I get the vindictive fantasies out of my head. But I you were far nicer than I would have wanted to be initially.

By the way, if the family had been perfect, I would never have gotten the insight into day to day life as a Mormon that I did get from the book. It felt honest, and that's harder to pull off than just being honest.

Dagonee

[ April 25, 2005, 03:44 PM: Message edited by: Dagonee ]

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Brian J. Hill
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Lost Boys is in my top five list of OSC books (I've said this before, but it bears repeating: I have very few favorites of anything in any category, so I stick to listing my top 5.) It's the most emotionally draining novel, I've ever read, which is precisely why I continue going back to it.

In his analysis of plays, Aristotle wrote that a good tragedy is one that arouses pity and fear in the individual audience members, followed by the purgation of that pity and fear. This book, unlike any other IMHO, reaches out and touches those emotions in a raw, searing manner, leaving behind a gaping open wound. I tear up countless times before I get to the last chapter, by which time I'm an emotional wreck.

Then, miraculously, those emotions are purged from me, replaced with the glorious hope that comes with my absolute surety that there will be a resurrection; that no matter how deeply affected we are by the loss of a loved one (and by this point Stevie is counted as one of my dearest loved ones) we will someday be reunited on the other side of the veil.

So in my personal experience, the "purgation" of the pity and fear is closely tied with my own faith, and the fact that I share it with the Fletcher family. But so it was with the Greeks. It was due to the shared religious experience that the tragedies had such an effect on the Classical Greek culture. This is not to say that one who is not of the Mormon faith cannot fully experience the power of Card's novel. Rather, I am saying that my own experience with Lost Boys is largely due to my spiritual beliefs.

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Orson Scott Card
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KetchupQueen, what will MAKE it hell for you is that you will be forced to sit in the same hot room with me and listen to me babble on and on and on and on ... and then you'll have to ask me to sign something or I won't shut up. I'm just warning you what hell will be like, if you're stuck with me.

Dagonee - the teacher really did quit after that year. So she's not "teaching" children anymore. As for what really happened: The tape recorder was only wishful thinking. So I had no weapon to hold over her head. I just realized she was an appalling human being, and we told Geoff exactly this: "You have to pretend that you have been unjustly sent to prison for a crime you didn't commit. But WE know you're innocent. WE know you're doing a great job as a student and as a human being. And we promise you'll never, ever have to go back to that school once this school year is over." We kept the promise and send him and Emily to a private school for several years. The private school had its own strangeness, but they didn't go back to public schools until we had bought a house and moved into the city school area, where the schools were integrated and the education was far better.

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Orson Scott Card
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As to Lost Boys as a tragedy - maybe so, maybe so. But the tragic hero, in Aristotle's view, if I recall aright, was supposed to come to his bad end because of his own tragic flaw - hubris, or whatever. If you accept Aristotle's definitions, then Lost Boys would be mere pathos, not tragedy, in large part because Stevie HAS no flaw - it is his goodness and obedience that gets him into trouble. Unless it's simply his reticence to speak that is his "tragic flaw."

Personally, though, I simply think Aristotle was wrong. That is, he was describing tragedy AS THE GREEKS CREATED IT. But Catharsis come through EARNED emotional suffering, and I like your linking it to a shared religious experience.

But then, it partly depends on what you think the "religion" of Lost Boys is. Ostensibly, it would be Mormonism. But in fact I think the "public religion" of the novel is Family. Child-rearing. For Mormons - most of us, anyway - the overlap between the two "religions" is intense; but there are many who are not Mormon who have that same intensity of feeling about their children. It's not that the children are gods, and certainly not the parents; but it's a religion in the sense that there's an intensity of feeling and commitment that is at least as strong as any religious feeling. And to lose one's child is the worst thing in the world - what parent doesn't know this? So as long as we define religion in Lost Boys to the truly public religion of child-rearing, then I think your description is absolutely apt. In fact, by rational definition I've only written a few books that try for anything like "tragedy" - Lost Boys, Magic Street, Hart's Hope, Wyrms. Maybe Speaker for the Dead. Yeah, I think so. I can't think of any others. Some short stories, yes: Kingsmeat, most notably. And Unaccompanied Sonata.

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ketchupqueen
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quote:
KetchupQueen, what will MAKE it hell for you is that you will be forced to sit in the same hot room with me and listen to me babble on and on and on and on ... and then you'll have to ask me to sign something or I won't shut up. I'm just warning you what hell will be like, if you're stuck with me.

But see, you've never met me; I will talk and talk and talk myself. And if you dare to disagree with me about someting I say, we can have an eternity of knock-down, drag-out verbal fights interrupted only by me stubbornly ignoring your existance for a couple of millenia at a time until I turn around suddenly and start into you again. [Taunt]

It's a good thing that this is nothing like what I really believe hell is. [Angst]

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Brian J. Hill
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Very true; Aristotle's approach to defining theatre is flawed. But heck, we aughtta give the guy credit--the tragedy and comedy he wrote about was only a few centuries removed from 50 guys dancing in a circle singing songs and getting drunk off of cheap wine. [Smile]

Lost Boys does not fit classical definition of a tragedy--the hero's downfall is brought on by evil of another person, not through any fault of the hero, a plotline that would be unfamiliar to Aristotle--but what makes it "work" for me is exactly what Aristotle desribed. That is, the arousal and then purgation of strong emotions, which he called pity and fear.

As for the "public religion of the Family," I agree that anyone with children or strong family ties will be brought into the world of this novel. Most will be touched deeply by the experience of the Fletcher family, and there will be a strong emotional response. Where I differ is in the "catharsis" part of the equation. My catharsis in reading this story was deeply tied to my belief in the Resurrection and the Eternal Family; I am curious how those who have belief systems different from mine experience the purgation of the powerful emotions evoked by the story.

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Puppy
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When I read Lost Boys, I think to myself, "Man, my childhood must have SUCKED!" [Smile]

As I mentioned in the memory thread on the other side, I don't record memories very well. I have very few clear memories from childhood, almost as though I breezed through it in a daze. So while I'm sure that teacher was simply awful, I don't have any specific recollections of what went on.

Probably a good thing [Smile]

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aiua
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quote:
I am curious how those who have belief systems different from mine experience the purgation of the powerful emotions evoked by the story.
I chose not to view it in the religious sense that it was probably written in, but simply(ha!) as a great work of fiction. Albeit, a fiction which didn't really appear to be so fiction-ey until the last chapter or so.
But, please don't get me wrong, I shed just as many tears as the rest of you, but I wasn't looking for deeper meaning.

I apologize. That doesn't really sound quite like I meant it, but, for lack of cognative abilities, it will have to suffice.

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Dagonee
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quote:
the teacher really did quit after that year. So she's not "teaching" children anymore.
Thank goodness.

quote:
"You have to pretend that you have been unjustly sent to prison for a crime you didn't commit. But WE know you're innocent. WE know you're doing a great job as a student and as a human being. And we promise you'll never, ever have to go back to that school once this school year is over."
You're truly an inspiration - I hope I can be as wise a father as you.

Dagonee

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aragorn64
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I'm a Mormon, so those aspects of Lost Boys were familiar to me, sure. But I really think Card succeded in making it a book that "appeals to everyone, regardless of their beliefs."

It's only one of two books that I've ever cried while reading. (Ironically, the other one is a book by OSC as well.) But I think the emotions in that book went beyond tears.

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Zotto!
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quote:
quote:
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"You have to pretend that you have been unjustly sent to prison for a crime you didn't commit. But WE know you're innocent. WE know you're doing a great job as a student and as a human being. And we promise you'll never, ever have to go back to that school once this school year is over."
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You're truly an inspiration - I hope I can be as wise a father as you.

Me too.

Lost Boys is hands down my favorite OSC book, though Wyrms, Harts Hope, and The Worthing Saga come close.

*pause* I've been typing and erasing over and over, but I can't really find any words to describe the reasons the book affected me so much. Suffice to say that I hope I can make as loving a family someday.

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BandoCommando
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Scott, how is Speaker for the Dead tragedy? I've been re-reading it just recently, and while it starts out with a great deal of trauma, most notably for Novinha, the book ends in hope.

<Speaker for the Dead Spoilers below. --PJ>

The pequeninos and humans now have a chance at making a community of ramen.

Ender is redeemed from his guilt of killing all the Buggers by reviving the Hive Queen, and also by making an understanding possible between the piggies and the humans. He's using his empathic gifts to create peace instead of destroying his enemy.

Novinha is made whole again, as her years of guilt begin to erode away. Ender and Novinha marry, and Ender becomes a surrogate father to Novinha and Marcao's children, giving them the care and attention that they never had growing up.

Valentine and Ender are going to be reunited.

There are a couple things that did not end well. Miro's injury, for instance. But in his case, he is befriended by Jane and then takes a leave of absence from Lusitania, partially in search of some sort of psychological healing.

From Ender's point of view, he killed Human with his bare hands, but we know that it is actually a re-birth of Human.

In short, there are a few loose ends at the conclusion of Speaker, but nothing that creates a tragedy out of the story.

Anyway, here I am lecturing you on YOUR book. But I'm curious to hear in what ways Speaker is a tragedy - I've probably been missing something HUGE this whole time.

[ April 26, 2005, 12:52 PM: Message edited by: Papa Janitor ]

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olhando
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I have to admit while i read that book i got the jist about glass being a pervert and what not but i had no idea what was going on untill stevie started telling them not to touch him.
like it all comes together at one point in most of your books. it's not a bad thing though. the thing i kept thinking was that the computer game was the whole book, and that people where taking kids from their homes through their computers or something. i had no clue what was going to happen and i had really far out expectations. however i wasnt dissapointed.
Like the whole boy thing.... man i sort of understood where you where going with that. i think "the dog thing" or something like that was what you said. wow powerful stuff that first chapter or so was.

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Magson
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quote:
It's only one of two books that I've ever cried while reading.
Have you read Dennis L McKiernan's DragonDoom? If you don't cry at the end of that you have no heart! And I always choke up at the end of The Iron Tower by the same author too. Great stuff!

I keep saying to myself that I'm gonna read Lost Boys but I still haven't done so. In some ways I almost think I'm afraid of the level of involvement I know I'll come to feel with it, so I avoid it for that reason. I will read it. . . someday. But not yet.

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Shanna
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I particularly enjoyed what was mentioned about the Mormon traditions of the family. In high school, I knew two mormon boys but living in the south meant that many people (including some of our friends) considered in a flaw in their character that was best never mentioned. Being from a Catholic family who doesn't worship, I liked seeing the influence of the religion on the family because its not something I've experienced personally.

The first (and only time so far) that I've read Lost Boys, I seriously sat in my room in shock after finishing it. I couldn't do anything but sit and think about what I had just read. I'm very close to my family and nearly lost my own life once, so it hit quite close to home.

I'm quite nervous now handing my copy out to other people. Sexual molestation is becoming increasingly common and its hard tell which acquantainces may be forced to relive their experiences while reading the book. Mr Card, have you received any contact from your readers who were victims of sexual abuse and who shared their reactions to the book?

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aragorn64
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quote:
Have you read Dennis L McKiernan's DragonDoom? If you don't cry at the end of that you have no heart! And I always choke up at the end of The Iron Tower by the same author too. Great stuff!
No, I don't think I've read it...
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Moonshine
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I am Mormon and I loved the book. The way the family was portrayed was real. The LDS families that seem so...perfect(?) they hide behind the lies they tell themselves. There's always something that everyone works through. And now I'm rambling...

What I really want to say is how much this book affects me. Lost Boys contains the reality of life (minus the supernatural behaviors). The Christmas scene was so powerful because the whole time one knows what is coming, but doesn't want it to be true. I can't even put it into words.

It's powerful writing that I hope one day to accomplish.

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AB
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I read LB out loud to my husband and we both just sobbed. And I had read it twice before. I'm tearing up thinking about it. I loved the book before I had my own "stevie" and now I don't know if I can read it again. :-)

Ketchupqueen - I am very sorry for your loss.

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ketchupqueen
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Thank you. (((hugs))) Have you seen the miscarriage support thread? You might find it useful.
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Yozhik
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quote:
KetchupQueen, what will MAKE it hell for you is that you will be forced to sit in the same hot room with me and listen to me babble on and on and on and on ... and then you'll have to ask me to sign something or I won't shut up. I'm just warning you what hell will be like, if you're stuck with me.
No, what will make it truly hell for both ketchupqueen and you will be having to hear my vast collection of stories about every single solitary cute, clever, amusing, or peculiar thing that has ever been done by my dogs.

And since the dogs will be with us, they will continue to do such things for infinity. For example, the big brown Lab will jump on you and thoroughly exfoliate your faces with her tongue, and the bad little Lab mix will steal any item of footwear you leave unguarded for half a second and then wave it at you tauntingly.

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ketchupqueen
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Aaaah! I hate dogs.

My bad cats will kick your dogs' butts.

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Yozhik
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Awwww... but the dogs love YOU. [Kiss] [Razz] :doggie kiss:

Can you honestly say, ketchupqueen, that you hate this puppy?

[ April 28, 2005, 08:37 PM: Message edited by: Yozhik ]

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Yozhik
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quote:
I have had people tell me that a GOOD Mormon family would have been warned by the Lord not to let their child succumb to such danger.
Who are these people? I want to add them to the list of People To Be Whacked With a Stick for Being an Embarrassment to My Religion, right behind the folks who keep submitting Holocaust victim names for baptism.
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Moonshine
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I agree...strongly.
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katharina
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I finished Lost Boys at 3:00 am one night, and was too scared to have it in the room, too scared and sad and moved to go anywhere, and too tired to stay awake until light. I sneaked out onto the landing and tossed the book down the stairs, as far away from me as I could get. My roommates found it in the morning leaning against the front door, much to their puzzlement.

I loved it, every bit. So much so that I gave away my copy immmediately and haven't been able to read it since. I don't want to reread it and have the experience be less than it was the first time. That can't be matched.

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ketchupqueen
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quote:
Can you honestly say, ketchupqueen, that you hate this puppy?

It's a cute puppy. I'm not saying they're not adorable, the evil little sly things.

But if it came near me, I'd hate it, yeah. [Razz]

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