Hatrack River
Home   |   About Orson Scott Card   |   News & Reviews   |   OSC Library   |   Forums   |   Contact   |   Links
Research Area   |   Writing Lessons   |   Writers Workshops   |   OSC at SVU   |   Calendar   |   Store
E-mail this page
Hatrack River Forum Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Hatrack River Forum » Active Forums » Discussions About Orson Scott Card » Swedish words in Speaker for the dead and sequels

   
Author Topic: Swedish words in Speaker for the dead and sequels
Swede
Member
Member # 7560

 - posted      Profile for Swede   Email Swede         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I noticed when reading the Speaker that Card is using several swedish words as names, such as framling, varelse, utlanning and also Plikt, Syfte along with others. One word however, I am reasonably sure is not swedish; raman/ramen.
Does anyone have an idea were it comes from?
(It could of course be a product of OSC imagination, but if not,it would be fun to know)

Posts: 132 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Orson Scott Card
Administrator
Member # 209

 - posted      Profile for Orson Scott Card           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
All the words came from a Swedish dictionary. If I weren't on the road, I'd check to find it. I may have adapted it, however, for English speakers - so it might have been based on a word that is somewhat different and harder for Americans to pronounce <grin>.

then again, i might have taken it from a completely different source and forgot that I did. But my memory is that, since Valentine was coining the words while living on a Nordic-founded colony (where she found the man she married) she would use a future version of Swedish as her source for all the terms.

Posts: 2003 | Registered: Jul 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
WntrMute
Member
Member # 7556

 - posted      Profile for WntrMute           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I always figured it was a shout-out to an inexpensive, filling, yet nutritionally void oriental noodle processed food product -- eternally the favorite of college students and starving artists.
Posts: 218 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Orson Scott Card
Administrator
Member # 209

 - posted      Profile for Orson Scott Card           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Oddly enough, I had never heard of Ramen noodles when I chose the word "raman" to represent one degree of foreignness/alienness. And I anglicized the word by making the plural "ramen" by analogy with man/men. That's not how it would have been done in Swedish (and for all i know, the Swedish original was probably an adjective without a noun form).
Posts: 2003 | Registered: Jul 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Swede
Member
Member # 7560

 - posted      Profile for Swede   Email Swede         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I do not recognize raman, noodles or not. But that hardly matters. OSC, you have done a good job matching character with name. I especielly like Jakt (=hunt) and Plikt (=duty). But I can not but wonder why Swedish people would call their planet Trondheim, which is a city in Norway. If not the scandinavians have finally realized that they can cooperate [Wink]

[ March 17, 2005, 04:30 AM: Message edited by: Swede ]

Posts: 132 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Swede
Member
Member # 7560

 - posted      Profile for Swede   Email Swede         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Talk about not noticing! Ramen is a Swedish word that means either "the frame" or "the paw" (a bear´s paw). The translations taken from a Swedish-English dictionary. The "unchanged" form is ram. (I have no idea what the grammatic term is in English). These are actually quite common words, I don´t know how I could not notice this before!

[ March 17, 2005, 07:34 AM: Message edited by: Swede ]

Posts: 132 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
AntiCool
Member
Member # 7386

 - posted      Profile for AntiCool   Email AntiCool         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
That blows my mind that somebody that went to college would not be familiar with ramen noodles. Are ramen noodles a relatively recent arrival to the US?
Posts: 1002 | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
rivka
Member
Member # 4859

 - posted      Profile for rivka   Email rivka         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I remember them showing up as common, cheap, and popular about 15-20 years ago, I think. They existed before then, I'm sure, but not as dorm food. [Wink]

Remember, OSC is age-challenged. [Big Grin]

Posts: 32919 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Verily the Younger
Member
Member # 6705

 - posted      Profile for Verily the Younger   Email Verily the Younger         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Remember, OSC is age-challenged.
Oh, I don't know. I think he's done an acceptable job of attaining an advanced age. [Taunt]

Edit: But even if he hasn't, that was still a pretty sweet piece of assonance.

[ March 18, 2005, 11:06 AM: Message edited by: Verily the Younger ]

Posts: 1814 | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
AntiCool
Member
Member # 7386

 - posted      Profile for AntiCool   Email AntiCool         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
>.<
Posts: 1002 | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ramen
New Member
Member # 13375

 - posted      Profile for ramen           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Swede:
Talk about not noticing! Ramen is a Swedish word that means either "the frame" or "the paw" (a bear´s paw). The translations taken from a Swedish-English dictionary. The "unchanged" form is ram. (I have no idea what the grammatic term is in English). These are actually quite common words, I don´t know how I could not notice this before!

Why would Orson classify a group of people with a word such as "paw" or "frame. The word probably comes from rå (raw) + man (man).

http://enderverse.wikia.com/wiki/Hierarchy_of_Foreignness

Posts: 1 | Registered: Apr 2016  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Szymon
Member
Member # 7103

 - posted      Profile for Szymon   Email Szymon         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Now, THAT's a revival. 11 years. Wow.
Posts: 682 | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
PSI Teleport
Member
Member # 5545

 - posted      Profile for PSI Teleport   Email PSI Teleport         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
You gotta wonder what they googled to get to that thread.
Posts: 6331 | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.
UBB Code™ Images not permitted.
Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Hatrack River Home Page

Copyright © 2008 Hatrack River Enterprises Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.


Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2