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» Hatrack River Forum » Active Forums » Books, Films, Food and Culture » Random Chinese News Thread (Page 1)

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Author Topic: Random Chinese News Thread
Mucus
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Been hitting some random events that don't seem big enough for a new thread, but worth noting anyways. Also I just noticed this forum doesn't have PMs. So anyways.

Wen Jiabo's interview on CNN with Zakaria
http://www.danwei.org/video/wen_jiabao_on_cnn.php

Not quite as controversially frank as his 2008 interview, but still quit interesting. Especially (or in spite of?) in light of how it was censored back in China proper.
http://blogs.wsj.com/chinarealtime/2010/10/07/netizens-react-premiers-interview-censored/

[ August 10, 2011, 11:04 AM: Message edited by: Mucus ]

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Mucus
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The other random news item is:
quote:
The Nobel Peace Prize for 2010 has gone to China's best-known dissident, Liu Xiaobo — who is presently in a prison cell where he is serving 11 years for incitement to subvert state power.

The Norwegian Nobel committee praised Liu Xiaobo for his "long and non-violent struggle for fundamental human rights in China. The ... committee has long believed that there is a close connection between human rights and peace." As the news was announced, transmission of both BBC news and CNN television channels was interrupted in China.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2010/oct/08/nobel-peace-prize-winners-list-liu-xiaobo

Good news? Bad news? I don't know yet. But it is worth noting.

(Of course the previous winner was Obama, the result of which was a whole lot of *shrug*)

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Mucus
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Oh, also the XKCD map was updated with a section representing China behind the Great Firewall which was actually pretty fun with real "stuff" labelled.

http://shanghaiist.com/2010/10/08/the_chinese_internet_as_a_land_mass.php

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BlackBlade
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I wish he could have snuck in a Tudou reference or Baidu.

I don't get the Ma Le Ge Bi reference.

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Mucus
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Might be part of the procedure, he doesn't have Google or Bing, but does have Google Talk and Google Buzz. So maybe it makes sense to have Baidu Baike but not Baidu itself.

Ma Le Ge Bi is just http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grass_Mud_Horse

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Mucus
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Oddly, he doesn't seem to have English Wikipedia but does puts in Baidu Baike ... weird.
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BlackBlade
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Thanks Mucus, I do like to keep current with my Chinese memes.
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Mucus
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quote:
Fall brings slipping temps, change of color and mid-term elections to the United States, which also means it's time to bring out the spectre of China to wrangle votes. The anti-China rhetoric is really heating up as Americans head to the polls in less than one month’s time. According to a piece in the New York Times, in roughly the past week, 29 candidates have jumped on the anti-China train... much of it focusing around, wait for it, you guessed it - JOBS!

While the ads mean to take advantage of the growing anti-China sentiment in the US as a result of continued high unemployment and cries of unfair trade practices (aka currency manipulation), one has to wonder how this will affect US-China relations going forward. Running an ad and ending it with thanking the candidate in Chinese for sending jobs to China isn’t exactly playing nice.

http://shanghaiist.com/2010/10/12/election_time_laying_the_china_smac.php
http://www.zonaeuropa.com/20101010_1.htm

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BlackBlade
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I don't think this is going to do much right now, but anger at China could be one of the few things Democrats and Republicans could both blunder together on.
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Blayne Bradley
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The green dam girl is so moe!
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BlackBlade
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quote:
Originally posted by Blayne Bradley:
The green dam girl is so moe!

This is the Chinese thread. Take your dirty Japanese words somewhere else.
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SenojRetep
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A group of 23 Communist Party elders in China has written a letter calling for an end to the country's restrictions on freedom of speech.

quote:
Twitter users in China report that references to the letter on different internet message boards are already being deleted.

The censors appear to be doing what they always do, seeking to wipe away any traces of criticism of the party that would soil its reputation amongst ordinary people, our correspondent says.


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Blayne Bradley
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quote:
Originally posted by BlackBlade:
quote:
Originally posted by Blayne Bradley:
The green dam girl is so moe!

This is the Chinese thread. Take your dirty Japanese words somewhere else.
China is probably one of the main Japanese export markets for Anime and Manga to the point that I know Otaku's whove moved to China to access 'early-bird' manga's/anime releases because their entry requirements are less strict then Japan's.
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BlackBlade
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Their manga is still translated into Chinese characters.

Also, I wouldn't say they are a main importer of Japanese manga. Sure it's there, but it isn't as big a deal at least when I was in Beijing compared to say Taiwan where they have it everywhere.

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BlackBlade
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Not to double post but Hayao Miyazaki hates the concept of "moe." I'd be willing to bet Osamu Tezuka wouldn't approve of it much either. Of course I view moe as synonymous with lolicon, but either way, it's an aspect of anime I wouldn't lose sleep over disappearing.
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Blayne Bradley
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The definition of moe I accept is Tv trope's

quote:

Coined in Japan around the year 2000, "Moe" (萌え) is an ill-defined otaku term that means, amongst others, "cute", "huggable", "endearing". While it's sometimes used to describe a series, it's more about a specific kind of character. Can also incorporate sexiness, to some. To others it invokes a Big Brother Instinct.

Or to put it another way, Moe is the ability of a character to instill in the audience an irrational desire to hug them, protect them, comfort them, help them with whatever they need/want, etc.

However, woobies or other awkward male characters can be seen as "moe" by fans. Like their Distaff Counterparts, they posses traits like quirkiness, clumsiness, social awkwardness, and other Character Tics that give them an endearing vulnerability. This can be especially effective if they possess a tough outer shell that belies a soft, squishy heart. If you ever hear a male character referred to as "adorkable" chances are good they're pretty moe. If they aren't generically cute in canon, expect them to be so in fanfic and fanart. Also, despite general belief that moe females are more tolerated, often the "bad traits" that make moe girls "offensive", "sexist" and "bad role models" are somehow seen as "cute, squishy and adorable" in boys.

To say that it is synonymous with lolicon is something I would passionately disagree with. I would concede lolicon as something of a subcategory but not something where one equals the other and vice versa.

Hayso Miyazaki is a director, as such directors like him or Quentin Terantino obviously would have some very keen views on various subjects, but under my definition of moe I would argue that regardless of his views of it he has used 'moe' to some extant already in his various movies.

In fact I'm fairly confused how the conversation got to where it is, green dam girl is a Moe-amphropormization, that's self evidence, maybe in China they have their own word but I suspect Chinese Anime/Manga Otaku's probably use 'moe' and I'm fairly confused why you jumped to a negative opinion over it or why Hayao's opinion of it matters on this specific instance.

I would disagree with the assertion that Osamu wouldn't approve of it, without some evidence or statement to that effect considering how Astroboy and other characters almost certainly indirectly rely on moe appeal for part of their character.

Amy Pond. 11th Doctor and Rory are arguably moe under this definition, Mikuru Asahina is arguably moe, loli's are simply an extreme version of moe.

Yuki Nagato more moe!!! D'aaaawwww

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fugu13
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While there are aspects of moe culture that can be distasteful, it isn't synonymous with lolicon at all. Some parts of it are definite offshoots of lolicon culture, though.
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BlackBlade
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quote:
Originally posted by fugu13:
While there are aspects of moe culture that can be distasteful, it isn't synonymous with lolicon at all. Some parts of it are definite offshoots of lolicon culture, though.

I know that the two terms are not synonyms, but as long as moe includes anything loliconish, I find it hard to give moe much of my time.

I'm mostly vehemently against girls "budding" and being cute/sexy so as to entice male viewership.

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Blayne Bradley
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I conceded that, but as I said, I disagreed with considering them synonymous.

But yeah see! Not only me! I'm not crazy.

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Blayne Bradley
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quote:
Originally posted by BlackBlade:
quote:
Originally posted by fugu13:
While there are aspects of moe culture that can be distasteful, it isn't synonymous with lolicon at all. Some parts of it are definite offshoots of lolicon culture, though.

I know that the two terms are not synonyms, but as long as moe includes anything loliconish, I find it hard to give moe much of my time.

I'm mostly vehemently against girls "budding" and being cute/sexy so as to entice male viewership.

Seems more of a problem/issue with fan service, one could equally be critical of making action girls strong and independent because "its a way to attract male viewship" by that same logic.

Honestly there is nothing wrong with using a character trait/archetype to make a character at least superficially endearing/attractive, what makes the character and by extension the show worth watching is if they're willing to go past simply superficial "moe-points" (as an example) and make the character and her/his/its interactions 3-dimensional.

On the surface Mikuru Asahina is a moe-blob, but in reality from the light novels and the anime she's encredibly important for the plot and the interactions between the SOS-dan members.

Or Code Geass when Rolo killed Shirley, sure she was a fairly moe woobie but up until that point was a steady climb of character development that made her death tragic and meaningful to the show/story.

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BlackBlade
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There's nothing wrong with female characters being attractive looking, cute, funny, girly, or flirty. I find it creepy when they try to make prepubescent girls seem physically attractive, or out and out sexual.
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Blayne Bradley
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quote:
Originally posted by BlackBlade:
There's nothing wrong with female characters being attractive looking, cute, funny, girly, or flirty. I find it creepy when they try to make prepubescent girls seem physically attractive, or out and out sexual.

That isn't what is widely considered the goal or intention of moe, moe is making a character endearing/huggable/cute, this providing any level of sexiness is usually a side effect that only applies to older characters between the ages of 15-20 something.

For example Rika Furude from When They Cry Higurashi is "moe", she's cute, endearing, and everything about her makes you want to run over to her and hug her to protect her from all the times she gets murdered in series, paradoxically even moreso when she stops "acting" moe.

But never in this entire time did I (or alot of fans) consider her sexually attractive or a character I would consider a viable or attractive mating option.

If we take Kodomo no Jikan which is a series that intentionally seeks out to deconstruct the lolicon genre the girls while to some extant are depicted in a sexual fashion, is completely separate from what makes them moe, they're moe because of how screwed up they're clearly are, they're sexualized because that is how they act/think, but being moe is not what made them sexualized.

As such I'm certain that your distaste with moe is at best misinformed.

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BlackBlade
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quote:
That isn't what is widely considered the goal or intention of moe.
Yes, I'm sure there are many many older men who are jumping up and down with agreement.

quote:
For example Rika Furude from When They Cry Higurashi is "moe", she's cute, endearing, and everything about her makes you want to run over to her and hug her to protect her from all the times she gets murdered in series, paradoxically even moreso when she stops "acting" moe.(emphasis mine)
See I don't want young girls that are designed to make you want to grope them at all. I've seen that anime, and it wasn't the worst example of moe I've seen. The miniskirt is a bit much, but whatever I'm not a prude. Her slamming her head on a knife blade over and over was kinda messed up though.

quote:
But never in this entire time did I (or alot of fans) consider her sexually attractive or a character I would consider a viable or attractive mating option.
That's great, you can't speak for everybody, especially the artists and writers. Blayne, I've been to Akihabara. Have you? I've been to the stores, the multilevel buildings where it's nothing but anime, manga, etc. I've seen just about every female character from every anime you've probably seen dressed up, sexed up, and in suggestive poses. I've seen the hentai books (not read, but noticed them) where the stuff hinted at in many of those shows is explicitly drawn out. If you don't think there aren't fan artists who draw that stuff out just go to vagrantart sometime.

I already understand that there are elements of moe that are completely devoid of sexuality, such as anthropomorphism. But to me the whole term is tainted with it. I like Hayao Miyazaki's female characters precisely because they are sweet, funny, enthusiastic, intelligent, but they also aren't 12 years old and forgetting to wear pants.

quote:
As such I'm certain that your distaste with moe is at best misinformed.
As such, I'm certain you don't have a clue what I am and am not informed about when it comes to this medium.
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TomDavidson
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I have to admit that I was a little creeped out by Ponyo's extremely unhealthy interest in her "boyfriend."
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Blayne Bradley
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quote:

See I don't want young girls that are designed to make you want to grope them at all. I've seen that anime, and it wasn't the worst example of moe I've seen. The miniskirt is a bit much, but whatever I'm not a prude. Her slamming her head on a knife blade over and over was kinda messed up though.

If you equate platonic protective hugging with groping (and believe me I know the difference) then I just don't see this going anywhere, there's a gap between the two a mile wide.

Also that scene was meant to be disturbing, its a horror anime/manga/visual novel afterall.

quote:

Yes, I'm sure there are many many older men who are jumping up and down with agreement.

And such Older Men are idiots and not proper Otaku's if they actually think that is what Moe is supposed to be, now they can think moe is attractive in the same way they think a cat-person is attractive but that's completely different, that's taking a trope and turning it into a fetish and isn't the definition of the trope, thats just rule 34.

quote:

I've seen just about every female character from every anime you've probably seen dressed up, sexed up, and in suggestive poses.

So? This doesn't have anything to do what the proper definition of moe is. Sex sells even in Japan, it's just marketing, they can call it Moe all they want but it doesn't make it true except "From a certain point of view".

Is probably closer to what I'm trying to get at.

quote:

I like Hayao Miyazaki's female characters precisely because they are sweet, funny, enthusiastic, intelligent, but they also aren't 12 years old and forgetting to wear pants.

Legitimate personal preference but an still very incorrect vision of what moe is/not is.

Heck being 'sweet, funny, enthusiastic, intelligent' is a possible and valid interpretation of what constitutes moe, with "fogetting to wear pants" nowhere even remotely close to true to the basic definition, that's not moe, I challenge you to name 7 examples*.

quote:

As such, I'm certain you don't have a clue what I am and am not informed about when it comes to this medium.

Honestly read as written charitably speaking you sound like you know a little but letting personal distaste with the egregious fanservice of shonen/shoujo anime colour and subvert the definition of what moe is and sorta passing off that definition as the truth.

*In order to narrow it down name 7 characters that fit the tvtropes-strict definition of a 'cute huggable characters that evokes a protective instinct in either the audience, the other characters or both' that is simultaneously designed to be blatantly and unrealistically/disturbingly sexy and meant for cheap egregious fanservice.

I can name 7 who of course aren't, Hinata Hyuuga (Naruto), Yuki Nagato (Haruhi Suzumiya), Asahina Mikuru (Again, Haruhi Suzumiya), Tsukasa (Lucky Star), Kate the Canadian girl from Sketchbook Colours' is a hilarious example with her Engrish and Wapanese, Nanoha (Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha), Hinamori Amu from Shugo Chara (shut up, guilty pleasure), Chrona (Soul Eater).

They fit the strict definition of moe without egregious fanservice.

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Blayne Bradley
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quote:
Originally posted by TomDavidson:
I have to admit that I was a little creeped out by Ponyo's extremely unhealthy interest in her "boyfriend."

I've had to deal with similar, albeit slightely older (late elementary school just before highschool), I think the curiosity Ponyo expressed had alot to do with him being the first Human her age shes ever met.
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BlackBlade
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Blayne:
quote:
Honestly read as written charitably speaking you sound like you know a little but letting personal distaste with the egregious fanservice of shonen/shoujo anime colour and subvert the definition of what moe is and sorta passing off that definition as the truth.
I've never once said my definition MUST be accepted as gospel. I just don't particularly enjoy getting physical contact with young girls I don't actually know.

Don't let my preference for disliking moe stop you. But it's still a Japanese word, and we are in a Chinese thread. [Razz]

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Blayne Bradley
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And whose the older brother to who!? Japanese culture descends from Chinese culture, its only natural for Big Brother to learn something from Little Brother.
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BlackBlade
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quote:
Originally posted by Blayne Bradley:
And whose the older brother to who!? Japanese culture descends from Chinese culture, its only natural for Big Brother to learn something from Little Brother.

Nope, it works the other way around. Japan had it's shot traipsing about the Chinese country side pillaging, raping, murdering. When China tried it, tsunamis stopped them. Karma would seem to indicate Japan has a world of hurt coming.
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Mucus
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quote:
China's Communist Party Central Committee ended its annual meeting Monday by elevating Vice President Xi Jinping to a vice chairmanship of the powerful Central Military Commission, apparently cementing his role as the country's next president and demonstrating that the closely guarded succession process remains on track.

At the same time, the conference ended with only the vaguest mention of political reform, largely ignoring a recent small but growing clamor for more freedom and less news media censorship coming from a group of a dozen party elders, a hundred human rights activists and dissidents, newspapers, and even Prime Minister Wen Jiabao, who vowed this month to push for reform "until the last day of my life."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/10/18/AR2010101805882.html

Hate to judge a man by his appearance, but with precious little else to go on, I gotta say I have a bad feeling about Xi Jinping.

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BlackBlade
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But he's a South China man Mucus, that has to count for something!
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Mucus
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I don't think so, at least Wikipedia says he was born in Beijing with ancestral origins in Shaanxi.
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BlackBlade
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quote:
Originally posted by Mucus:
I don't think so, at least Wikipedia says he was born in Beijing with ancestral origins in Shaanxi.

Right but his major assignments were in Fujian.
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Mucus
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Well, maybe. But thats kind of marginal and more importantly I'm not sure that follows that he would have an affinity for Southern China (or to be fair, that he doesn't). Hu Jintao was assigned to Tibet as his major assignments and that seems to result in a whole lot of "meh."

Anyways, I'm not saying I necessarily have a rational reason for it. I just have a gut feeling that the guy is bad news when I see him.

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SenojRetep
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China widens rare earth embargo to US and Europe

After a month-long unacknowledged embargo of rare-earth minerals to Japan (in putative retaliation for the capturing of a Chinese fishing boat and its captain in a sea-lane dispute), China has widened the unofficial embargo to include at least some shipments of rare-earth minerals to the US and Europe, inhibiting the ability to produce LCD displays, advanced batteries, and several other economically and militarily essential products.

The embargo is seen to be retaliation for the US pressing the WTO on Chinese trade practices regarding clean energies (specifically state subsidies that exceed those allowable under their trade agreements and trade barriers to imports).

Here's Krugman on why China's monopoly on rare earths is problematic

Will Winecoft and Dan Drezner on the strategic implications of the embargo.

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Blayne Bradley
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Well maybe just maybe, someone should have been smart enough to realize that the emerging world power having 95% of the world's supply is a bad idea and maybe keep the infrastructure of your current uneconomic mines open.

A simple case of where unfortunately free market globalist economices run smackdab into political reality, china's mines were vastly cheap to import from but were very pollutant to their own enviroment, so now they need to close them to reorganize and reduce pollution and this screws up the world supply chain.

Simplest solution is to begin yesterday reopening mines in Russia and USA/Canada to broaden the supply, right now there's nothing that can be done.

Even if there wasnt a political or a trade dispuite the mines are a massive heath hazard to the locals and need to be cleaned up.

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Mucus
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quote:
Originally posted by SenojRetep:
... The embargo is seen to be retaliation for the US pressing the WTO on Chinese trade practices regarding clean energies (specifically state subsidies that exceed those allowable under their trade agreements and trade barriers to imports).

It's been reported that way, but I find the connection dubious. The probe was announced less than a week ago. Given the glacial pace of these kinds of policy changes in China (and the US for that matter), I find it doubtful that the policy is connected.

Indeed, a bit of digging indicates that the policy has been choregraphed more than a year ago, far earlier than even the Japanese issue. http://www.chinalawblog.com/2010/10/chinas_rare_earths_we_called_this_one.html

Tariffs started as far back as 2006 according the CBC.

Anyways, whatever the reason, I tend to think of it as good news for everyone, except for maybe Japan. Rare earths shouldn't be mined in China, the current process is extremely toxic and even radioactive and has been targetted by human rights groups and environmentalists due to its effects on villagers. It would be better to mine them in the West where the regulations are better and in this economy, the increase in jobs aren't half bad either. *shrug*

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Samprimary
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The US used to be the world's biggest exporter of these. China only has about 30-35% of the world's supply. Basically, they were willing to subsidize their industry (and run them without pollution and worker safety controls) until the point where nobody else found them economically viable, and now they're exploiting an artificial monopoly. In one case, a Chinese company literally went into a former US competitor, bought it, and took home all of the equipment. There's no physical reason why the US couldn't produce this stuff for itself.

However, it will take a few years to gear up the industry again.

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SenojRetep
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I can accept the gun being loaded, but I find the idea that the Japanese imprisonment of the captain wasn't the trigger difficult to buy, because the two events happened in such a short time frame. Similarly with the widened embargo; I imagine the policy was put in place, waiting for the moment at which it was deemed useful.

As for it being good news for everyone, I think you're eliding many negative consequences for China and its trade partners. The worst of which could be increased economic tensions and likelihood of international trade wars, leading to global inflation on essential goods in a time of high unemployment. Tensions are already pretty high after a spate of unilateral currency devaluations (by countries taking China's lead in using currency manipulation as a tool to grow their export sector) and Brazil's consequent move (Drezner talked about that in a previous blog post) to "raise taxes on foreign inflows" in order to combat what the Brazilian foreign minister called "a global currency war."

So China ratcheting up trade tensions in an already tense environment doesn't seem, to me at least, to be good news for everyone.

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Mucus
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It doesn't matter if it was the "trigger" or not (although I find the American perception that the Chinese bureaucracy is *that* efficient amusing) if the reason is an underlying long term trend that was basically put into action more than a year ago, then I gotta say I have little sympathy for being caught off guard now.

As for tensions, I'm aware of them but I think they will wash out in the end. After all, the usual complaint is that China is selling stuff too cheap. In this case, whether or not it is a full ban or not, they've already announced drastic cuts in the amount that is allowed to be exported which should lead to very high prices. That is the opposite which should address the complaints about stuff being too cheap. People can't complain about stuff being too cheap AND too expensive at the same time [Wink]

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fugu13
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Also, anyone who wants production to increase in the first world should be for the embargo -- there's no chance it'll be produced in a much more expensive place while the quantities needed are available cheaply elsewhere.
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SenojRetep
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I can recognize the positive consequences of the embargo (e.g. eventual diversification of the production). But I can also recognize the short-term negative consequences and question whether the negative consequnces outweigh the positive ones. It seems more prudent to weaken the monopoly through encouraging greater safety and environmental regulations through international pressure, as well as an end to China's currency manipulation, rather than supporting an abrupt embargo that might lead to shortages, rationing and hoarding of essential raw materials, particularly given the currently somewhat precarious state of international trade.
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Blayne Bradley
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Is there any proof that the currency manipulation is of any significant portion of the trade issues?
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Mucus
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SenojRetep: There are a few different questions that are being answered. The relatively narrow one I targeted was effectively "Is this one action by China a net good for most nations?" to which I answered yes. Your last response seems to be an answer to the question "is this the most optimal action by multiple nations out of all possible actions?" which I think is probably much too broad.

The other issue is that an export quota or embargo on one commodity is much more domestically politically feasible than a far-reaching revaluation of the yuan and more realistic than expecting provincial authorities to enforce safety and environmental regulations. At this point in time, the central government has taken to blowing up outdated power plants and factories just to make sure that local authorities don't merely restart them when the central government moves its attention elsewhere.

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SenojRetep
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Man pleads guilty to trying to spy for China.

quote:
Shriver acknowledged at the hearing that he met with Chinese officials about 20 times beginning in 2004 and that he received a total of about $70,000 from Chinese intelligence officers.

One $40,000 payment was in exchange for his agreement to apply for a job in the U.S. government, obtain classified information and pass it to China, according to Judge Liam O'Grady who described the allegations during the hearing.

Mucus: My comments were a reaction to fugu's "anyone who wants production to increase in the first world should be for the embargo." All things being equal, I favor diversifying production capabilities. However, I think there are rational reasons to oppose the embargo even given that nominal preference (such as the negative shock to international trade it will likely cause).

To answer your narrow question, I think that the embargo is not a net good for most nations, because although many nations may benefit from an easing of China's monopoly, the potential negative consequences outweigh that benefit. And I believe that China's motive in emplacing the embargo is almost certainly not one of international goodwill but of local political expediency (a bone, as it were, to the nationalist hoards and a stick to produce favorable foreign policy from trading partners).

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Mucus
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quote:
Originally posted by SenojRetep:
And I believe that China's motive in emplacing the embargo is almost certainly not one of international goodwill but of local political expediency (a bone, as it were, to the nationalist hoards and a stick to produce favorable foreign policy from trading partners).

Goodwill? No, but I would argue that no nation would determine trade policy based on selfless goodwill, at most maybe enlightened self-interest.

But neither do I think recent political events have much bearing on the issue either, which is becoming more clear as reporters dig deeper.
quote:
Rare-Earth Furor Overlooks China's 2006 Industrial Policy Signal
By Bloomberg News
...
China’s curbs on rare-earth exports may owe more to a 2006 policy to create fewer, larger companies than a knee-jerk response to trade and territorial disputes.

A directive that year tagged mining among the pillar industries the government wanted state enterprises to dominate to enhance returns and global competitiveness. This year it started closing down private mining companies to consolidate the industry around a handful of producers led by Inner Mongolia Baotou Steel Rare Earth High-Tech Co.

Global repercussions from the overhaul drew attention in July when the government said it would cut export quotas 72 percent in the second half of the year.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-10-21/rare-earth-contention-in-u-s-japan-overlooks-china-s-2006-policy-signal.html

quote:
Is China's rare earth power play really such a big deal?
...
I am amazed at the parochialism of the press on this issue. It would seem as if the NYT thinks the tail is wagging the dog. China is restructuring its rare earth mining industry to reduce 129 legal, and no one knows how many illegal, producers of rare earth mine concentrates to just 3 or 4 entities controlled by regionally based, state-owned base metals giants. Currently 3 have been officially named: BaoSteel, Ziangxi Copper, and China MinMetal (This last is a trading company, not a miner per se). Chinalco seems to have added itself to the list also.

The purpose of this "consolidation" is to discover the industry's pricing and actual production both for the purpose of central planning. China, in my view, is acting quite rationally in order to organize an industry it has long recognized as too important to be left to the fierce and often destructive competition arising from China's wild west approach to capitalist development of new industries. The next two five-year plans feature a massive green development drive that cannot happen without the regular and smooth production and delivery of technology metals to the manufacturers whose green economy products critically depend upon them.

http://oilandglory.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2010/10/21/is_chinas_rare_earth_power_play_really_such_a_big_deal
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SenojRetep
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China drops its officially unofficial rare earth embargo on Japan, the US and Europe. It will maintain a quota system, in which the state allows increasingly limited amounts of rare earths out of the country. According to a chart embedded in the Times article, the quota system has been equivalent to introducing an enormous export tariff on Lanthanum, as the foreign price has soared to more than 10x the domestic price. Other rare earths face similar disparities between price within China and price outside China.
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Samprimary
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More on my prior mentioned You Will Never Learn Chinese.

http://nromenuvote.tumblr.com/post/1328710159/rogers-2005-30

chinese is insane

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0Megabyte
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*Reads the link above. Dies a little inside.*
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Mucus
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Yep.
Makes puns really fun.

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