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» Hatrack River Writers Workshop » Forums » Next, Please Introduce Yourself » Seeking Second Career :-)

   
Author Topic: Seeking Second Career :-)
Mark
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Member # 10257

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Greetings All:

Like yourselves, I'm an aspiring writer and am very happy to have found an ongoing, online writers workshop. I'm a fan of classic science fiction and yearn for the return of writers like Issac Asimov and Arthur Clarke. I'm tired of the future fantasy and super hero stories that have no grounding in actual science -- too much deus ex machina. Of course, what I like isn't popular, so I don't expect I'll be quitting my day job!

At present, I'm working on a science fiction novel. I'm about 50,000 words into it with a goal of hitting 100,000 before trying my hand in the market. It is an expansion of a 16,000 word novella I submitted to the Writers of the Future Contest. No luck there other than an honorable mention.

I really enjoyed OSC's "Ender's Game." Like many, it felt very familiar. I had the opportunity to meet OSC when I was selected as a session presenter at Endercon in 2002. I would like to add that I was very impressed with him. He was one of the most contemplative, open-minded people I've met, and I feel very badly for how he was attacked for his traditional values during the opening of the Ender's Game movie. If his detractors had actually spoken with him, I'm certain they would have found common ground. If you read these posts Scott, know that you have one more supporter out there.

I'm looking forward to lurking for a bit and finding where I might fit into this writer's group. Thanks for having me.

Cheers,
Mark

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Meredith
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Welcome to the treehouse.
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extrinsic
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Mark, welcome to the creative mind hats rack at the river thereof.

All the membership are ambitious writers, never-ending ambitions, not aspiring since learning how to write in grade school, aspiring for publication, yes, equal ambition footing with all published or otherwise writers.

Golden Age science fiction revival is a platform of Writers of the Future judge Dave Wolverton, Galaxy Press, publisher of the anthology and L. Ron Hubbard properties, Author Services, the agency representing W&IotF and Hubbard properties, and a subgenre generally.

Conventions of the age and revival are loose and fast elaboration of facts, rivet and chrome gadgetry and science, technology, social sciences, themes orbited around those influences upon human society, culture, science, and technology, or personified beings likewise, a meld of Romanticism's poetic justice brand and Realism cum Modernism and Postmodernism's emphasis on reality imitation, and escapism in the vein of adventurous heroic journeys beyond creche home, homeworld, home culture to contend with adult privileges and duties crises.

In moral terms, a core theme of Golden Age science fiction is young WASP male values; the revival era more culturally diverse, reflecting current social and cultural norms, and inclusion of technological, scientific, cultural, and social motif real-world projections of motifs imaginatively portrayed during the Golden, Silver, and Platinum Ages.

Outside of WotF, Wolverton, Hubbard, and Card's revivalist leanings, Jon Scalzi's Old Man's War is a signal revival work. Keith Laumer and David Drake also lean that way. Female science fiction writers are more a phenomona of the Platinum age and delve more deeply into character moral empasis as central crises and appeals than plot emphasis on action-adventure crises and appeals.

A newly emerging thematic essential, generally across literature, is crises caused and satisfied by individuals' self-involved ambitions with noble outcomes, though that conceptual theme has been around since at least the time of the ancients, lost for eons due to strong emphasis on propoganda writing. Literature now focuses on individuals instead of national ideologies, also a Modernism phenomena.

This to ask: where does your novel fit within the revival canon?

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Grumpy old guy
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Welcome. Jump write in, the water's fine. While I grew up reading copious reams of science fiction books, and even a few Astounding tales, my forte in writing would appear to be fantasy. That being said, I am currently working on developing a 'classic' sci-fi story where real-time interstellar flight is possible through the use of artificial Exotic Matter induced Einstein-Rosen bridges and where space combat is NOT the same as flying an airplane in a dogfight.

As you said, there may not be much of a market for such reality.

Phil.

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Mark
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Meredith: Thank you.

extrinsic: Thanks for all the pointers on where I might try to sell my work! My book-in-progress seeks to tell a compelling story from the perspective of the protagonist while using a believable backdrop shaped by technology that is entirely plausible. While I enjoy Asimov and Clark, I'm not trying to replicate them (as if I could :-) ).

Phil: I found that I can't write fantasy well. It is certainly the more popular genre, so I think that's an advantage for you. I guess I spent too many years working as an engineer, and I cannot get my mind to develop magical worlds. I can't let go of all the rigor I wired into my grey matter. I can talk (rant?) for hours about astrodynamics and popular media. When you finish your classic sci-fi story, I'd be interested in seeing it.

Mark

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LDWriter2
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I'm really late with this one---however do be welcome as you probably know already this is one of the good places to learn the craft.
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Mark
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LDWriter2: Thanks. I'm afraid that I've learned enough about writing to understand how much I don't know. I suppose that in learning from the wisdom and knowledge of those here, I'll come to understand how much more I don't know. At some point, I hope to steer the ship towards better writing! :-)
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