FacebookTwitter
Hatrack River Forum Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Hatrack River Forum » Active Forums » Discussions About Orson Scott Card » What would your "reading" life be without OSC?

   
Author Topic: What would your "reading" life be without OSC?
TheDisgruntledPostman
Member
Member # 7200

 - posted      Profile for TheDisgruntledPostman   Email TheDisgruntledPostman         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Seriously, if OSC was never "inspired" to start writing masterpeices i don't think i would ever start reading outside of school. No other book or particular author got me thinking and reading like Mr.Card. I would still be speding hours at end playin video games and watching tv (not that i don't, but not as much as before). How how Mr.Card effected your reading life.
Posts: 262 | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
MidnightBlue
Member
Member # 6146

 - posted      Profile for MidnightBlue   Email MidnightBlue         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I certainly wouldn't be reading science fiction and fantasy right now, but I'd definitely be reading. (Exception: I would be reading HP, but I probably wouldn't consider it fantasy.) I've always been a reader.
Posts: 1547 | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Ramdac99
Member
Member # 7264

 - posted      Profile for Ramdac99   Email Ramdac99         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I never read for fun untill I read Ender's Game........and the rest is history.
Posts: 484 | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
mr_porteiro_head
Member
Member # 4644

 - posted      Profile for mr_porteiro_head   Email mr_porteiro_head         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My reading habits wouldn't be much different.
Posts: 16551 | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kojabu
Member
Member # 8042

 - posted      Profile for kojabu           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Yea, same here (as porteiro). I'd still read sci-fi, but I think I'd have a broader range of authors read (instead of reading 3 OSC books in a row, persay).
Posts: 2867 | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
CRash
Member
Member # 7754

 - posted      Profile for CRash   Email CRash         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
OSC's books marked my switch from the "young adult" bookshelves to the regular section of the bookstore.
Posts: 973 | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Frangy.
Member
Member # 6794

 - posted      Profile for Frangy.   Email Frangy.         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I start to read sci-fi with him.
Posts: 111 | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Enderwillsaveusall
Member
Member # 6227

 - posted      Profile for Enderwillsaveusall   Email Enderwillsaveusall         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
my reading life would be nonexistant besides Hp
Posts: 81 | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
bCurt
Member
Member # 5476

 - posted      Profile for bCurt   Email bCurt         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My leisure novel reading wouldn't be almost exclusively OSC as it is right now. That's primarily a time issue, though - I read what I know I'll like.

Having discovered OSC in high school, that discovery didn't really change my reading habits much, it just provided another great author for me to read.

Posts: 134 | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Chungwa
Member
Member # 6421

 - posted      Profile for Chungwa   Email Chungwa         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My reading life wouldn't be too much different.

I wouldn't have had the great joy of reading all the OSC novels, though - so my reading life would be a little more dull.

Posts: 367 | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
aiua
Member
Member # 7825

 - posted      Profile for aiua   Email aiua         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
For starters, I wouldn't be spending so much time here. :B
And I probably would never have tried science fiction. So, thank you, Mr. Card!

Posts: 1215 | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
HandEyeProtege
Member
Member # 7565

 - posted      Profile for HandEyeProtege           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I've always wondered at the people who say they never used to read, and then Ender's Game came along and totally changed their life. Not in a bad way at all, it just seems strange to me, having read voraciously ever since I learned that those black marks on the page could be deciphered. Ender's Game had an equally dramatic effect on me - as a glance at my bookshelves will show, laden with just about every work of fiction OSC has written - but if I'd never read it I'd certainly have read something else in it's place.

My reading tasted have changed since that time, though. I read a lot of political thrillers a la Tom Clancy, or more mainstream SF like Michael Crichton or Dean Koontz. I don't know how much credit OSC gets for that change, though, over just my own evolving tastes.

Posts: 47 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Farmgirl
Member
Member # 5567

 - posted      Profile for Farmgirl   Email Farmgirl         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I don't know that my reading life would change much except I probably wouldn't be reading so much fiction.

I never read any OSC until I was in my 30s. And most of my adult life I had gradually drifted away from fiction to reading only non-fiction types of things.

After I read Ender's Game, then I went on a binge of reading everything OSC, and sometimes that branched then into other writers I heard about here or through his columns. So it drove me back to fiction again, and I relearned the joy of losing myself in a story for a few hours to make the real world go away. [Smile]

FG

Posts: 9538 | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Orson Scott Card
Administrator
Member # 209

 - posted      Profile for Orson Scott Card           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
People who "never read fiction" until Book X (for some, Ender's Game; for millions, Harry Potter), the reason is that they were TRAINED not to enjoy reading. They learned in school that fiction was all about working - writing "reading journals," book reports, or simply slogging through boring books in order to be able to pass tests.

I think it has a lot to do with Scarlet Letter - but that's another thread.

They learned to decode the marks on paper, but reading ITSELF was not a joy. It's like ... some people just like hitting things with a hammer, while others only think it's worth the effort if they really want to put a nail in something. They're just waiting for something they want to nail.

I'm just happy that some people find that book from my little shelf in the bookstore.

I myself was in the read it if it has letters on it category. But I still recall finding books that were simply luminous and made me hunger to read more. Happened over and over again: Dawn's Early Light by Elswyth Thane opened up historical novels for me, preparing me for Pride and Prejudice and Gone with the Wind; "Call Me Joe" and "Tunesmith" opened me up to sci-fi, and it was reopened by Andre Norton (Galactic Derelict; Catseye) and Heinlein (Citizen of the Galaxy, Tunnel in the Sky). Joseph Altsheler's war books about the French and Indian War and the Civil War got me fascinated by military history and military fiction, preparing me for heavy history as well as fiction. Thornton W. Burgess's talking-animal books and then, most blessedly, Felix Salten's Bambi (so much better than the movie!) made me a sucker for fantasy that is tied to reality.... and so on. Ben-Hur was a book of gold to me, for instance.

Above all, though, was Louisa Mae Alcott's Little Men (followed by Little Women) and Mark Twain's The Prince and the Pauper. These were books that made me frantic for sequels and related information.

The key, though, is that NOT ONE of these books was assigned at school. A bare handful were even obtained from the school library. Most were given to me by my parents; a couple by siblings or friends.

I have never LOVED an assigned book the way I've loved books that came from people I love, to be read solely for my own pleasure, at their recommendation.

Posts: 2005 | Registered: Jul 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Chungwa
Member
Member # 6421

 - posted      Profile for Chungwa   Email Chungwa         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
The key, though, is that NOT ONE of these books was assigned at school. A bare handful were even obtained from the school library. Most were given to me by my parents; a couple by siblings or friends.
I can't recall how many times I've heard someone say, "please don't assign that book in class - I like it and if it's assigned it'll be ruined for me."
Posts: 367 | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lego feet
Member
Member # 8093

 - posted      Profile for lego feet   Email lego feet         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I mostly ONLY read OSC. Why? Because he writes about what's on my mind most of the time. Space, aliens, love, christianity, politics...

So yes, my reading life would be drastically different if not non-existant.

Posts: 39 | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
mr_porteiro_head
Member
Member # 4644

 - posted      Profile for mr_porteiro_head   Email mr_porteiro_head         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Luckily, I already loved to read before I got to high school and the English teachers tried to teach me that I hated it. I never believed them. I just hated *their* books.
Posts: 16551 | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
HandEyeProtege
Member
Member # 7565

 - posted      Profile for HandEyeProtege           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
OSC wrote:
quote:
People who "never read fiction" until Book X (for some, Ender's Game; for millions, Harry Potter), the reason is that they were TRAINED not to enjoy reading. They learned in school that fiction was all about working - writing "reading journals," book reports, or simply slogging through boring books in order to be able to pass tests.
It's sad, but I can see the truth of it in so many people. Do you think there is an alternative? It seems like there has to be some formal education in order to develop people into capable readers, and generally that means assignments and tests. There are probably a lot of people here who enjoy it so much that they would have developed on their own just by reading voluntarily, but not nearly enough of the population in general that schools could take it out of the curriculum.

So how can schools avoid taking the enjoyment out of it? (Besides the obvious of steering clear of The Scarlet Letter!)

Posts: 47 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Antony
Member
Member # 7947

 - posted      Profile for Antony   Email Antony         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Well, I think reading OSC got me back into Sci-fi after a long time of er... not sci-fi...ing

Also, when I read Enders Game for the first time I hadn't been reading in ages, and that started me again, I read tons of books afterwards.

Posts: 95 | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
El JT de Spang
Member
Member # 7742

 - posted      Profile for El JT de Spang   Email El JT de Spang         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I caught up to OSC so long ago, I only read "him" when something new comes out. This translates to about once a year, or about 0.5% of my reading.

However, a lot of my memories from reading are OSC books. I've found (as I'm sure most of you have) that his character development is superb, and the characters from a given story stick with me for years, till I can't even remember which story they're from.

So while I don't read OSC that frequently, he's still one of my top 3 SF authors. And his stuff get reread a lot more than my other authors. Luckily for OSC and fam that I move so much, and almost every reread means I rebought the book because I lent or lost it.

Posts: 5462 | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
MidnightBlue
Member
Member # 6146

 - posted      Profile for MidnightBlue   Email MidnightBlue         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by CRash:
OSC's books marked my switch from the "young adult" bookshelves to the regular section of the bookstore.

ditto. It would have happened eventually anyway [Big Grin] but I don't have the slightest books I would be reading right now.
Posts: 1547 | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
James Tiberius Kirk
Member
Member # 2832

 - posted      Profile for James Tiberius Kirk           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'd probably have read a Harry Potter book by now. Otherwise, nothing much will have changed.

--j_k

Posts: 3616 | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Occasional
Member
Member # 5860

 - posted      Profile for Occasional   Email Occasional         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
It wouldn't have been any different, other than one less favorite author to read. For me, OSC was a latecomer in my reading habits.

My "Switch from Young Adult to Adult" reading was Stephen King and Tom Clancy. In fact, I don't think I really had a Young Adult time of reading. It went from several super-young readings, to Narnia Series and very quickly to other things. In fact, for me the question would be what would have happened to my reading life without C.S. Lewis?

Posts: 2207 | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Chungwa
Member
Member # 6421

 - posted      Profile for Chungwa   Email Chungwa         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Maybe it's more important to have that first author/book that OSC is talking about than the specific author is. What I mean is, different books act as "the book that started my reading enjoyment" for different people.

For me it was David Eddings. I'd never suggest that Eddings was one of the best writers around. Even if he's one of my favourite authors, I don't pretend that most of the books I read aren't better. But his was the first story I read that I did soley for enjoyment, instead of for finding hidden meanings, etc.

Posts: 367 | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
jtgame
Member
Member # 8337

 - posted      Profile for jtgame   Email jtgame         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I've been eagerly awaiting each new OSC book since around 1980. Though I've randomly reread a few of them two or three times over the years, a few months ago, I started systematically reading all of them. I'm currently in the "singletons", my word for the novels like PastWatch, Treasure Box, Lost Boys, and so forth, in which is wonderful to experience the great variety and breadth and depth (the research for PastWatch must have been incredible). I'm also concurrently reading the Homecoming series, which I like even more the second time around.

It's interesting the changes about what and how things you read strike you differently as your life progresses. When I first read Ender's Game I was just about to get married, then I had 5 kids, then after 12 years I got divorced, then four years later married again, 7 years so far. Especially from the unwanted divorce and the associated misery and trying to still be more a dad than an uncle amidst such negativity, I appreciate all the more the things about truth, life, relationships, good and evil, and community that come out in OSC's novels (as well as his Uncle Orson reviews and WarWatch columns, which I also suck up). I have the same feeling about the scriptures, noticing and seeing things new.

I just have to gush and say how much it all has meant to me, such that I would consider OSC, just through the written word, the most influential human in my life, outside of my family and religious figures (yes I'm LDS too). While I fell in love with reading fiction years before Ender's Game, he's set a standard that's hard for other writers to even come close to, though I am a fan of several others. It's kind of similar in music. For me the all time greatest is Jimi Hendrix, and then there are others I enjoy.

Anyway, that's it for my embarassing gushing. Thank you, Uncle Orson!

Posts: 8 | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Sid Meier
Member
Member # 6965

 - posted      Profile for Sid Meier   Email Sid Meier         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
While it wouldn't have put me off of Sci-fi since I got hocked to it after watching quite randomly ST: Nemesis in the video store. However I doubt I'ld quite have as many books as I have now, I have 2-3 whole books shevles taken up by books fantasy, scifi, historical and alternative historical fiction, history books, etc etc. It was the SHarp novels that put me into historical fiction and playing Caesar III for the PC that got me interested into history but however it was EG that really got me into military history and strategy and I wouldn't be on this site being talkative without OSC's EG. (Which I found on my teacher's desk one day and asked to borrow it since I thought it was about a game [Razz] )
Posts: 1567 | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
jtgame
Member
Member # 8337

 - posted      Profile for jtgame   Email jtgame         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Oh yeah, one more very significant thing I forgot to mention about the result of reading books by OSC. After reading Songmaster, as a result of the feelings it generated in me, and the desire to create the same in other people, for the first time outside of school assignments, I sat down and began to write fiction myself, leading to a very enjoyable hobby, even though I came to realize it wasn't to be more than that.

[ July 11, 2005, 02:04 PM: Message edited by: jtgame ]

Posts: 8 | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
jtgame
Member
Member # 8337

 - posted      Profile for jtgame   Email jtgame         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Sorry, I mean OSC (need edit feature!).
Posts: 8 | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Sid Meier
Member
Member # 6965

 - posted      Profile for Sid Meier   Email Sid Meier         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
click the blank piece of paper icon witht he pencil above your post.
Posts: 1567 | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sands
Member
Member # 8344

 - posted      Profile for sands   Email sands         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Ender's game was the first scifi i read and has opened me up to the entire third floor in my library [ROFL]
Posts: 48 | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sands
Member
Member # 8344

 - posted      Profile for sands   Email sands         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Orson Scott Card:
People who "never read fiction" until Book X (for some, Ender's Game; for millions, Harry Potter), the reason is that they were TRAINED not to enjoy reading. They learned in school that fiction was all about working - writing "reading journals," book reports, or simply slogging through boring books in order to be able to pass tests.

I think it has a lot to do with Scarlet Letter - but that's another thread.

They learned to decode the marks on paper, but reading ITSELF was not a joy. It's like ... some people just like hitting things with a hammer, while others only think it's worth the effort if they really want to put a nail in something. They're just waiting for something they want to nail.

I'm just happy that some people find that book from my little shelf in the bookstore.

I myself was in the read it if it has letters on it category. But I still recall finding books that were simply luminous and made me hunger to read more. Happened over and over again: Dawn's Early Light by Elswyth Thane opened up historical novels for me, preparing me for Pride and Prejudice and Gone with the Wind; "Call Me Joe" and "Tunesmith" opened me up to sci-fi, and it was reopened by Andre Norton (Galactic Derelict; Catseye) and Heinlein (Citizen of the Galaxy, Tunnel in the Sky). Joseph Altsheler's war books about the French and Indian War and the Civil War got me fascinated by military history and military fiction, preparing me for heavy history as well as fiction. Thornton W. Burgess's talking-animal books and then, most blessedly, Felix Salten's Bambi (so much better than the movie!) made me a sucker for fantasy that is tied to reality.... and so on. Ben-Hur was a book of gold to me, for instance.

Above all, though, was Louisa Mae Alcott's Little Men (followed by Little Women) and Mark Twain's The Prince and the Pauper. These were books that made me frantic for sequels and related information.

The key, though, is that NOT ONE of these books was assigned at school. A bare handful were even obtained from the school library. Most were given to me by my parents; a couple by siblings or friends.

I have never LOVED an assigned book the way I've loved books that came from people I love, to be read solely for my own pleasure, at their recommendation.

thats a perfect description of my life
Posts: 48 | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Roseauthor
Member
Member # 148

 - posted      Profile for Roseauthor   Email Roseauthor         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Generally, I was a realist to a fault. I would rather read to gain data than to be amused.

However, a Sgt in the Army gave me Enders Game after I had a car accident, which totaled my car. (He was sick of me being lame I think.. LOL) I resisted, told him I didn't read SF, bla blah.. and I read it.

It wasn't just the entertainment value that captured me, it was the fact that he created a character I could relate to and I didn't feel so 'peculiar' after reading it. It put me on a different path.

My studies took a different direction, my loyality as a reader was solid!!!!! (I love his work!)

Still, my favorite read is Lost Boys! Best work was Stone Tables!

And I still feel blessed that I was able to talk to this man on a phone when I kept missing him in book signings!

I would have to say, reading ONE book, changed the direction of my mind, life and thinking. (not to mention my spiritual walk--even if he doesn't like that burden!!!)

Posts: 162 | Registered: May 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.
UBB Code™ Images not permitted.
Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Hatrack River Home Page

Copyright © 2008 Hatrack River Enterprises Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.


Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2