FacebookTwitter
Hatrack River Forum Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Hatrack River Forum » Active Forums » Books, Films, Food and Culture » Alcohol (Page 2)

  This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2   
Author Topic: Alcohol
Strider
Member
Member # 1807

 - posted      Profile for Strider   Email Strider         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
.... the drink is like 6/7ths spirits. I am at a loss to believe that some people could not taste this.
certain types of liquid mixed together have surprising tastes. I agree that if a Long Island is made right you can barely tell there's alcohol in it.

Ever had a chocolate cake shot? Explain to me how a shot where you finish by putting a lemon in your mouth tastes exactly like eating chocolate cake, but if you don't finish with the lemon, it just tastes like a horrible mix of alcohol.

Posts: 8741 | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Starsnuffer
Member
Member # 8116

 - posted      Profile for Starsnuffer   Email Starsnuffer         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I've only ever tried a touch of a long island iced tea and it didn't taste a thing like alcohol, despite it being chock-full of it. Anyways. I think you articulated your reasoning for not drinking very well in the OP, bravo. But I can also see how trying to use that argument on somebody not really ready for a discussion on the reasoning for drinking could get messy, and how you could feel like if you don't explain yourself you're not being honest with whoever's asking. Everyone else has had good advice about what to do, so I'll just say "nice OP."
Posts: 655 | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
theamazeeaz
Member
Member # 6970

 - posted      Profile for theamazeeaz   Email theamazeeaz         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Wow. Thanks for all this great advice and support (so much now, I can't acknowledge all the ideas individually). I've got (at least) four more grad schools to visit this month, many of which will probably take the prospectives to bars, so the topic will surely come up.

To the person who asked: I just one day decided that soda was pointless because it contained no vitamins and diet soda had no calories so I really didn't get anything out of drinking it, not even energy. I was a fan of orange soda, and diet coke, but didn't like carbonation. In fact, when a Coke factory was on Bill Nye, I couldn't believe the worker said people drank soda because of the carbonation. So I decided I wouldn't drink it starting new year's 2000 and I don't miss it. Occasionally, I get annoyed when there's no non soda option, but it's usually no big deal. I've since noticed that there are people who are physically addicted to diet coke, so I'm glad I'm not. On a more interesting note, I am addicted to milk. I know this because I get a rush of endorphins from drinking powdered milk, which tastes awful.

I like the underage drinking ad at the bottom. Sorry google, I'm 21.

Posts: 1757 | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
tt&t
Member
Member # 5600

 - posted      Profile for tt&t   Email tt&t         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My husband doesn't like the taste of alcohol or the sensation one gets from drinking. This means that I'm really lucky, cos I always have a designated driver without having to organise it [Smile] (I do drink, occasionally).

He doesn't really get hassled about it - anymore - , but some people do ask "why not" which can be a bit annoying - however no one will ask why you're not drinking if you already have a drink in your hand. So just make sure you get a drink first, preferably something that looks like it might be alcoholic. If someone asks what you want to drink, say something like "I'll make this one a juice thanks". Or just say you'll get your own cos you want to look at the bar list or some other such excuse. They shouldn't ask if you want another drink if yours is more than half full (and if it is you can just say you still have to finish the one you have) so drink slowly [Razz]

I think once you get into the way of it, it won't be a problem. Good luck [Smile]

Also - if you don't enjoy being with your friend when they're drinking and you're not, you don't have to go along to the drinking occasions, just catch up with them some other time. That way you get to have fun, and they won't ask why you're not drinking if it's a non-drinking activity.

Posts: 1431 | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Samprimary
Member
Member # 8561

 - posted      Profile for Samprimary   Email Samprimary         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The idea that some people can drink a long island and not taste any alcohol at all is a new one to me. I mean, I believe you if you're saying it, but ..

mind = blown

Posts: 15417 | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Synesthesia
Member
Member # 4774

 - posted      Profile for Synesthesia   Email Synesthesia         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I hate carbonation.
It's so fizzy and painful.

Posts: 9938 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Primal Curve
Member
Member # 3587

 - posted      Profile for Primal Curve           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Don't feel bad about not drinking. Penn & Teller and James "The Amazing" Randi don't drink or do drugs, and they're athiests as well. So you're in good company.

I do drink, but not very much or really very often.

Posts: 4753 | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Tresopax
Member
Member # 1063

 - posted      Profile for Tresopax           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
My main trouble is justifying this decision to my peers in a way that expresses my personal disapproval without making them feel like they have to justify their decision to drink, attempt to tell me that I could find a drink I liked that doesn't taste alcohol-y, continually offer me drinks, or socially isolate me.
I think you may be approaching this backwards. My guess is that, when drinkers take offense at someone not drinking, the reason is more often than not because they want to justify their own drinking to themselves. Giving a good reason for not drinking makes them feel the need to come up with some sort of better response, so as not to feel immoral in your eyes. So, my bet is that the better the reason you give for not drinking, the more they are going to be upset at you and the more they are going to try to convert you.

If you have no interest in converting them to your point of view on drinking, then I'd suggest giving as little of a reason is possible - and also a reason that would apply only to you personally and not them. That way they don't feel like you are calling them bad for drinking. For instance, you might just say you don't like it, and add nothing more. I've found that tends to work, if you repeat it once or twice, unless people really want to press the issue.

Posts: 8120 | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Chris Bridges
Member
Member # 1138

 - posted      Profile for Chris Bridges   Email Chris Bridges         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm 42, and I've had perhaps 20 alcoholic drinks in my lifetime. For the most part I've stuck with "Not interested" of "no, thanks." As others have said, offering reasons tends to make the questioner defensive about why he or she thinks differently. I'm also not terribly social and have become less so over the years, which helps [Smile]
Posts: 7790 | Registered: Aug 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Evie3217
Member
Member # 5426

 - posted      Profile for Evie3217   Email Evie3217         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Tresopax:
quote:
My main trouble is justifying this decision to my peers in a way that expresses my personal disapproval without making them feel like they have to justify their decision to drink, attempt to tell me that I could find a drink I liked that doesn't taste alcohol-y, continually offer me drinks, or socially isolate me.
I think you may be approaching this backwards. My guess is that, when drinkers take offense at someone not drinking, the reason is more often than not because they want to justify their own drinking to themselves. Giving a good reason for not drinking makes them feel the need to come up with some sort of better response, so as not to feel immoral in your eyes. So, my bet is that the better the reason you give for not drinking, the more they are going to be upset at you and the more they are going to try to convert you.

If you have no interest in converting them to your point of view on drinking, then I'd suggest giving as little of a reason is possible - and also a reason that would apply only to you personally and not them. That way they don't feel like you are calling them bad for drinking. For instance, you might just say you don't like it, and add nothing more. I've found that tends to work, if you repeat it once or twice, unless people really want to press the issue.

I completely agree with Tresopax. When you say that you don't drink for such and such a reason, people who DO drink get defensive because they feel that you don't approve of their drinking and are trying to convert them. They feel guilty for drinking and are trying to justify why they drink. Make the reason you don't drink as simple and as non-judgmental as possible.
Posts: 1789 | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Strider
Member
Member # 1807

 - posted      Profile for Strider   Email Strider         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
tell them you're a recovering alcoholic and that you have to go call your sponsor now.
Posts: 8741 | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scholar
Member
Member # 9232

 - posted      Profile for scholar   Email scholar         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Health reasons, don't want to go into it should be reason enough. I was very annoyed with my sister in law when at her wedding, she didn't want to offer a non-alcoholic option. My aunt was going through chemo, my grandmother had just had a massive stroke, my dad is a recovering alcoholic and my mom has a billion health problem. But all of us are LDS so she figured that we wanted a non-alcoholic option because we looked down on her for drinking, so she refused to provide one. In the end, my mom bought ten bottles of martinelli's, which my sister in law hid. We had to go search through the kitchen at the reception hall, find them and then pour our own drinks.
Posts: 1001 | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Strider
Member
Member # 1807

 - posted      Profile for Strider   Email Strider         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
who doesn't have a non-alcoholic option at a wedding?
Posts: 8741 | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Teshi
Member
Member # 5024

 - posted      Profile for Teshi   Email Teshi         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I do drink, just not often and almost always with dinner or in a social non-drunken situation. I don't often end up at a party or a bar where everyone's purely there to get drunk so the situation doesn't often arise. If I am in a place where others are drinking and I'm not, not drinking is usual enough that it's easy for me to say "No thanks."

I have never been pressured to drink. I think the trick is to not look apologetic about it- as if you might change your mind. Don't be aggressive, just be lightly dismissive. Make sure they know you're not going to drink beforehand, if at all possible so you're dealing with sober people. "Yeah... I'm not gonna drink..." you can say if you're with a new group of people. Or: "I'm gonna leave early and I have stuff to do so..." (I usually leave before things get drunken). Or: "It's too expensive, and I'm poor." (said with a laugh).

Eventually, people will figure out that you don't drink. If they're good people, they'll be cool with that.

Like I said, though, I have the bonus of people occasionally seeing me drink- always wine. I like wine and I can say so. I didn't always though- I just avoided situations where everyone would be drinking alcohol to excess.

[ March 03, 2008, 12:58 PM: Message edited by: Teshi ]

Posts: 8473 | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
rivka
Member
Member # 4859

 - posted      Profile for rivka   Email rivka         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Given the discussion of PKU on page one of this thread, I thought this might be of interest.
Posts: 32919 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
BannaOj
Member
Member # 3206

 - posted      Profile for BannaOj   Email BannaOj         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
As far as your worries about grad school I have a friend who while working on a PhD, went to "Thursday Beers" with the other grad students for several years, and never had a drink. It was an excuse to meet and socialize, with drinking as an option for those who wished to do so, but it was pretty low key.

Now it may depend on the line of study you are in, but I think overall grad students are a bit more accepting of doing one's own thing than lower division undergrads are.

Posts: 11264 | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
  This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.
UBB Code™ Images not permitted.
Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Hatrack River Home Page

Copyright © 2008 Hatrack River Enterprises Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.


Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2