Hatrack River
Home   |   About Orson Scott Card   |   News & Reviews   |   OSC Library   |   Forums   |   Contact   |   Links
Research Area   |   Writing Lessons   |   Writers Workshops   |   OSC at SVU   |   Calendar   |   Store
E-mail this page
Hatrack River Forum Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Hatrack River Forum » Active Forums » Books, Films, Food and Culture » Favorite Childhood Books

   
Author Topic: Favorite Childhood Books
lobo
Member
Member # 1761

 - posted      Profile for lobo           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I recently found a book that I loved as a kid.

I found a website that helps you discover books you don't have the title or author but vaguely remember the characters or plot. Cool.
http://community.livejournal.com/whatwasthatbook/

It is on its way from Amazon and I can't wait to share it with my kids. What are your favorites?

Andrew Henrys Meadow
http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Henrys-Meadow-Doris-Burn/dp/0970739923/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1228312473&sr=8-1

Posts: 570 | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Elmer's Glue
Member
Member # 9313

 - posted      Profile for Elmer's Glue   Email Elmer's Glue         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
There is a Monster at the End of This Book.
Posts: 1287 | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Goody Scrivener
Member
Member # 6742

 - posted      Profile for Goody Scrivener   Email Goody Scrivener         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Fox in Socks!
Posts: 4510 | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Eaquae Legit
Member
Member # 3063

 - posted      Profile for Eaquae Legit   Email Eaquae Legit         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Elmer's Glue:
There is a Monster at the End of This Book.

I LOVED that book!

And I'll add "Greedy Zebra," "There's No Such Thing As a Dragon," and "Revenge of the Magic Chicken" to that list.

Posts: 2849 | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lisa
Member
Member # 8384

 - posted      Profile for Lisa   Email Lisa         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
No Flying in the House
No Such Thing as a Witch
All the Danny Dunn books
All the Kerby books (Limerick Trick and the like)
The Forgotten Door
The Adventures of Isabel (Isabel, Isabel, didn't worry...)

Posts: 12266 | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Herblay
Member
Member # 11834

 - posted      Profile for Herblay           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Morris the Moose (and the sequels).

And a little older, the Choose your own Adventure series.

Posts: 685 | Registered: Nov 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scifibum
Member
Member # 7625

 - posted      Profile for scifibum   Email scifibum         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I read hundreds of children's books since my grandmother was a librarian and steered a bunch of the old books our way (I'm not sure if she purchased them from the library or something else [Eek!] ). I don't remember many specific titles.

But, reading with my kids has reminded me of a couple of old favorites. I'm pretty fond of "Go Dog Go!" I also like Harold/Purple Crayon stuff.

Posts: 4002 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Vadon
Member
Member # 4561

 - posted      Profile for Vadon           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Elmer's Glue:
There is a Monster at the End of This Book.

This is a classic. [Smile]

I really liked Mr. Popper's Penguins and the Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig when I was a child.

Posts: 1820 | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
katdog42
Member
Member # 4773

 - posted      Profile for katdog42   Email katdog42         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Good Night Moon
all the Amelia Bedelia books

Posts: 336 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ketchupqueen
Member
Member # 6877

 - posted      Profile for ketchupqueen   Email ketchupqueen         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I have to name favorites? They were ALL my favorites...

It would be much easier to list the books I DIDN'T like. That is a short list.

Posts: 21180 | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scifibum
Member
Member # 7625

 - posted      Profile for scifibum   Email scifibum         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
"the Amelia Bedelia books"

Tripped another memory, you did. Those were good.

Posts: 4002 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Sean Monahan
Member
Member # 9334

 - posted      Profile for Sean Monahan   Email Sean Monahan         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Elmer's Glue:
There is a Monster at the End of This Book.

As soon as I saw this thread title, I was going to post this.
Posts: 976 | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
String
Member
Member # 6435

 - posted      Profile for String   Email String         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The Giver
The whipping boy
Ninja turtles books (they had them.)

used to lay on my garage roof and read in the summer. Great place to hide from chores.

Posts: 278 | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
rivka
Member
Member # 4859

 - posted      Profile for rivka   Email rivka         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by lobo:
I found a website that helps you discover books you don't have the title or author but vaguely remember the characters or plot. Cool.
http://community.livejournal.com/whatwasthatbook/

There's a GoodReads group with the same purpose.
Posts: 32919 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
krynn
Member
Member # 524

 - posted      Profile for krynn   Email krynn         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
i think we had every Berstein Bears book there was. i liked those when i was young.
Posts: 801 | Registered: Nov 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
SteveRogers
Member
Member # 7130

 - posted      Profile for SteveRogers           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Roald Dahl books. All of them that were written for children.
Posts: 6020 | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Sachiko
Member
Member # 6139

 - posted      Profile for Sachiko   Email Sachiko         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Dove Isabeau
The Mysteries of Harris Burdick
Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs

Posts: 575 | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
aiua
Member
Member # 7825

 - posted      Profile for aiua   Email aiua         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I had these awesome Disney books. A whole set, each book was a different pastel-ish color. I liked to just sit and admire their lovely spines, all sitting there so cozy together.

And the Little Golden Books too.


I like the way sets look on my bookshelves.

Posts: 1215 | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
PSI Teleport
Member
Member # 5545

 - posted      Profile for PSI Teleport   Email PSI Teleport         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Seconding Mr. Popper's Penguins and Roald Dahl. This is a little older than "childhood" but I loved the My Teacher is an Alien series by Bruce Coville, and There's a Boy in the Girl's Bathroom by Louis Sachar. Actually, anything by him is good. (I have three autographed books!)
Posts: 6327 | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Dobbie
Member
Member # 3881

 - posted      Profile for Dobbie           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The Haunted Mountain
The White Mountains

Posts: 1794 | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Artemisia Tridentata
Member
Member # 8746

 - posted      Profile for Artemisia Tridentata   Email Artemisia Tridentata         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
If we are going all the way up to Roald Dahl and Louis Sachar age, then I will throw in The White Stag by Kate Seredy. My Dad read that to his sixth grade class for half a century. It was a hit every year.

EDIT: OK, I looked and goodreads says it was first published in 79. I remember Dad reading it to me sometime before 59. So, who ya gonna believe?

[ December 04, 2008, 07:22 PM: Message edited by: Artemisia Tridentata ]

Posts: 1167 | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
SteveRogers
Member
Member # 7130

 - posted      Profile for SteveRogers           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Roald Dahl was a first grade and beyond author for me. I definitely didn't understand a lot of it. But I really liked the absurd characters and situations. They were very fable/fairy tale-esque for me at that point.

I recently reread some of his books. And I realized that there's some stuff in some of them that really isn't appropriate for children at all.

Posts: 6020 | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Ron Lambert
Member
Member # 2872

 - posted      Profile for Ron Lambert   Email Ron Lambert         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I loved all the Robert A. Heinlein juveniles, especially Red Planet (long live Willis!), Tunnel in the Sky, and Starman Jones. It was the latter novel that led me to have a sense of reverence for all library books. In all, Heinlein wrote 12 novels that are considered juveniles, published by Scribner's from 1947-1958.

I believe the only Heinlein novel that has been made into a movie so far is Starship Troopers, which is not considered a juvenile. I think there are plans to make some other Heinlein novels into movies, but I haven't heard anything about it in a while. Heinlein had some very conservative political views (such as only people who have served in the military should be allowed to vote), so liberal moviemakers in Hollywood probably would not be fired up by a desire to make movies out of his works.

Posts: 3581 | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
T:man
Member
Member # 11614

 - posted      Profile for T:man   Email T:man         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Santa Cows!
Posts: 1568 | Registered: May 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Artemisia Tridentata
Member
Member # 8746

 - posted      Profile for Artemisia Tridentata   Email Artemisia Tridentata         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
We had several library bound childrens books that had been written as WPA projects. I loved them all. Titles that I still remember fondly include Millions of Cats, Gag; Bad Mousie, Dudley; and The Magic Bus,(The original is to the Joanna Cole series as Luke's lightsaber is to the D-cell ones at K-mart) and Saggy Baggy Elephant, Jackson.
Posts: 1167 | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Raia
Member
Member # 4700

 - posted      Profile for Raia   Email Raia         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The Phantom Tollbooth! I can't believe nobody's mentioned it yet...
Posts: 7853 | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
SteveRogers
Member
Member # 7130

 - posted      Profile for SteveRogers           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Harold and the Purple Crayon.

Game Over

Posts: 6020 | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
rivka
Member
Member # 4859

 - posted      Profile for rivka   Email rivka         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Artemisia Tridentata:
EDIT: OK, I looked and goodreads says it was first published in 79. I remember Dad reading it to me sometime before 59.

Copyright 1937

Now fixed on GR, too. Thanks for pointing it out!

Posts: 32919 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lisa
Member
Member # 8384

 - posted      Profile for Lisa   Email Lisa         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by SteveRogers:
Harold and the Purple Crayon.

Game Over

Steve wins the thread.
Posts: 12266 | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Philosofickle
Member
Member # 10993

 - posted      Profile for Philosofickle           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Someone else has read Cloudy with a chance of meatballs!!! Absolute favorite book in my childhood years.

Where the Sidewalk Ends
Falling Up
Dr. Suess's the Lorax
Little Critter - All of them
If you Give a Mouse a Cookie and the rest in that series

Posts: 208 | Registered: Sep 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Artemisia Tridentata
Member
Member # 8746

 - posted      Profile for Artemisia Tridentata   Email Artemisia Tridentata         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by rivka:
quote:
Originally posted by Artemisia Tridentata:
EDIT: OK, I looked and goodreads says it was first published in 79. I remember Dad reading it to me sometime before 59.

Copyright 1937

Now fixed on GR, too. Thanks for pointing it out!

Thanks rivka. There are pen and ink illistrations that would not have been in a 70's book eather. My number 1 daughter shares a name with Atila's mother. I am now waiting for a couple of granddaughters to be old enough that I can read the book to them.
Posts: 1167 | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kmbboots
Member
Member # 8576

 - posted      Profile for kmbboots   Email kmbboots         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Ron Lambert:
I loved all the Robert A. Heinlein juveniles, especially Red Planet (long live Willis!), Tunnel in the Sky, and Starman Jones. It was the latter novel that led me to have a sense of reverence for all library books. In all, Heinlein wrote 12 novels that are considered juveniles, published by Scribner's from 1947-1958.

I believe the only Heinlein novel that has been made into a movie so far is Starship Troopers, which is not considered a juvenile. I think there are plans to make some other Heinlein novels into movies, but I haven't heard anything about it in a while. Heinlein had some very conservative political views (such as only people who have served in the military should be allowed to vote), so liberal moviemakers in Hollywood probably would not be fired up by a desire to make movies out of his works.

Oddly, the book where Heinlein presents the idea that only people who have served in the military should be allowed to vote is Starship Troopers - the one book that has been made into a movie.

ETA: I would consider Heinlein more liberatarian than conservative. Before the Cold War, he had some almost socialist economic ideas.

Posts: 10613 | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sndrake
Member
Member # 4941

 - posted      Profile for sndrake   Email sndrake         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Two series of books really stand out in my memory:

The Freddy the Pig series by Walter R. Brooks and the Doctor Dolittle series.

And, since I was reading these in the 1960s, the books in the library were the original, non-bowdlerized versions.

I also remember reading and rereading Paul Gallico's The Man Who Was Magic several times. I'm pretty sure I have a copy of the book packed away in one of my boxes.

Posts: 4344 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sndrake
Member
Member # 4941

 - posted      Profile for sndrake   Email sndrake         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The Wonderful Flight to the Mushroom Planet.

I was delighted, a few years later, to find out that my 6th grade science teacher was the author's nephew.

That science teacher was a favorite, anyway, and stands out in my mind as a living example of taking advantage of the "teachable moment" - and why I know more than I would otherwise know about hydrogen sulfide.

Long story involving unhatched fertilized chicken eggs and an explosion. [Wink]

Posts: 4344 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Ron Lambert
Member
Member # 2872

 - posted      Profile for Ron Lambert   Email Ron Lambert         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Oh, yes--I forgot all about the Mushroom Planet. That was my first exposure to science fiction, back when I was in first grade. My teacher read it to the class. It got me hooked on the genre, when I was only five years old.

***SPOILER***
They needed sulfer.

Anybody remember Zip-zip and His Flying Saucer? They wouldn't make it into a movie, it was too silly a plot. I had to wonder if the kid's father deserved to be bailed out of his screwup that left a steamshovel needed for a new construction project in the wrong state. But it was fun and amusing to a kid in gradeschool.

I think that was the story that suggested that tonsils are the organs that enable telepathy--which was bad news to me, because my tonsils had been removed at the age of four (on the theory that it might alleviate my childhood asthma).

Posts: 3581 | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.
UBB Code™ Images not permitted.
Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Hatrack River Home Page

Copyright © 2008 Hatrack River Enterprises Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.


Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2