FacebookTwitter
Hatrack River Forum Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Hatrack River Forum » Active Forums » Books, Films, Food and Culture » Education has a Well Known Liberal Bias - and some Conservatives want to Change it (Page 1)

  This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2   
Author Topic: Education has a Well Known Liberal Bias - and some Conservatives want to Change it
Alcon
Member
Member # 6645

 - posted      Profile for Alcon   Email Alcon         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The Texas Board of Education is doing their 10 year reevaluation of the curriculum. Texas being the biggest text book buyer in the country - what they set as their curriculum will likely affect what goes into the textbooks. So to one degree or another, they are not just setting the curriculum for Texas for the next ten years, but the rest of the country.

Many Conservative advocacy groups are well aware of this. And they have been targeting the board for years with the goal of having de-facto control of it when this time came around. Well, they nearly achieved that goal. Seven of the 14 members are hard core, religious right conservatives. And they are hard at work trying to put a more conservative spin on the history we teach in Elementary, Middle and High School.

quote:
one guideline requires publishers to include a section on “the conservative resurgence of the 1980s and 1990s, including Phyllis Schlafly, the Contract with America, the Heritage Foundation, the Moral Majority and the National Rifle Association.”
That doesn't sound so bad. That's just teaching modern history. Knowing about these organizations and the effect they have on our politics is important for everyone. And they don't declare how they are to be portrayed, which means teachers can portray them in a neutral and honest way - hopefully.

quote:
here have also been efforts among conservatives on the board to tweak the history of the civil rights movement. One amendment states that the movement created “unrealistic expectations of equal outcomes” among minorities. Another proposed change removes any reference to race, sex or religion in talking about how different groups have contributed to the national identity.
Wait, what now? The civil rights movement created "unrealistic expectations of equal outcomes"? What on Earth is that supposed to mean? That White Christian Conservatives are superior to minorities, never mind all that civil rights gibber-jabber?

quote:
The amendments are also intended to emphasize the unalloyed superiority of the “free-enterprise system” over others and the desirability of limited government.
See now, that's what we call blatantly biasing history. That's a sort of propaganda as bad or worse as Soviet school room propaganda. Only tilting the other direction. Just because it supports free enterprise instead of communism doesn't make it any better. History teachers shouldn't be declaring one system superior to any other. They should simply display the facts and attempt to allow students decide for themselves.

quote:
One says publishers should “describe the effects of increasing government regulation and taxation on economic development and business planning.”
Okay, that really belongs more in Economics class rooms. But I'll buy that. As long as what they specify those effects to be is reasonable and matches the current Economic theory, then I don't really have a problem with it.

quote:
Throughout the standards, the conservatives have pushed to drop references to American “imperialism,” preferring to call it expansionism. “Country and western music” has been added to the list of cultural movements to be studied.

References to Ralph Nader and Ross Perot are proposed to be removed, while Stonewall Jackson, the Confederate general, is to be listed as a role model for effective leadership, and the ideas in Jefferson Davis’s inaugural address are to be laid side by side with Abraham Lincoln’s speeches.

Umm... what?

Here's the full Article.

[ March 11, 2010, 10:05 AM: Message edited by: Alcon ]

Posts: 3295 | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Mucus
Member
Member # 9735

 - posted      Profile for Mucus           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
On the bright side, this bit eliminates all references to how Christianity has contributed to America's identity. So its a bit of a mixed bag.

quote:
Originally posted by Alcon:
... Another proposed change removes any reference to race, sex or religion in talking about how different groups have contributed to the national identity.


Posts: 7593 | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
katharina
Member
Member # 827

 - posted      Profile for katharina   Email katharina         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
From the article:

quote:
“There is a bias,” said Don McLeroy, a dentist from College Station who heads up the board’s conservative faction. “I think the left has a real problem seeing their own bias.”
Sounds like a genuine difference in opinion to me. I can completely buy that there is often a bias.

I would be interested in an equally representative list of biased statements in the currently used textbooks.
----

I have a question - why does your title say "the Conservatives"? It isn't like everyone who considers themselves conservatives is part of a monolithic body and the whole can be described any member of the one. What about "some Conservatives"? That would be an accurate representation, and it would remove the impression you've created of high school football teams competing for a touchdown. It would be more of a civil discussion instead of what feels like a cheap shot.

----

Also from the article:
quote:
In other testimony Wednesday, Hispanic activists asked that more Latino figures be written into the social studies curriculum, particularly early residents of Texas who fought the central government in Mexico when Texas still was part of Mexico. American Indians complained that their history had been given short shrift.
The first half of this I agree with. Having gone to school in Texas and remember huge swaths of time being dedicated to the American Indians, I am not so sure I agree with the second.
Posts: 26076 | Registered: Mar 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Alcon
Member
Member # 6645

 - posted      Profile for Alcon   Email Alcon         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Sorry Kat, title changed. In my head "the conservatives" refers to the Conservative Coalition, Heritage Foundation, Republican Party, etc... It doesn't refer to your every day American that calls themselves a Conservative. But I see your point and have changed the title accordingly.

Back on topic, look at some of the things I've quoted though. Some of the things they want given more time I understand. I agree there probably is a certain Liberal bias. History teaching should be about presenting the facts and getting students to critically examine those facts. Some of the things they want though are just so blatantly biased to hard right Conservative - not even moderate Conservative - that it makes me scream.

[ March 11, 2010, 10:42 AM: Message edited by: Alcon ]

Posts: 3295 | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Orincoro
Member
Member # 8854

 - posted      Profile for Orincoro   Email Orincoro         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Unfortunately reality has a well known liberal bias.
Posts: 9912 | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Alcon
Member
Member # 6645

 - posted      Profile for Alcon   Email Alcon         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Current Texas Curriculum

I think, but am not sure, that this is the current curriculum. Reading through it now to see if the language as it now stands is particularly biased.

Posts: 3295 | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
katharina
Member
Member # 827

 - posted      Profile for katharina   Email katharina         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Aw...thanks! [Smile]

Well...to play opposing advocate about the Civil War, the issue of states rights and the encroaching power of the Federal government is a very real issue. A state was concieved to be different from a province, and an enormous amount of power has shifted from state governments to Federal government. The "interstate commerce" clause has been so expanded that it can justify just about anything, from seat belt laws to (ironically for this topic) a national curriculum (currently in the works).

A lot of those power is, in my opinion, very good - it's good to have national seat belt laws, and because of modern technology, state lines are not the hard lines between separate peoples that they used to be. However, the balance has shifted in a really big way, and you can say that it is going in inexorably in one direction because of the Civil War - once you're in the Union, you can't get out - the Federal government will burn your state to the ground if you try.

----

Oh, I am not going to look for examples of bias - not for a message board. I do research when I get paid or get credit.

It's good to remember in general that the NYT times article was a report of a specific moment in a larger conversation and not a good summary of the conversation. I would like to see a good summary of the entire conversation.

Posts: 26076 | Registered: Mar 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Badenov
Member
Member # 12075

 - posted      Profile for Badenov           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Orincoro:
Unfortunately reality has a well known liberal bias.

[Roll Eyes]
Posts: 38 | Registered: May 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Strider
Member
Member # 1807

 - posted      Profile for Strider   Email Strider         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
definition of liberal from conservapedia:

quote:
A liberal (also leftist) is someone who rejects logical and biblical standards, often for self-centered reasons. There are no coherent liberal standards; often a liberal is merely someone who craves attention, and who uses many words to say nothing.[1] Liberalism began as a movement for individual liberties, but today is increasingly statist, and in Europe even socialistic.

Posts: 8741 | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
katharina
Member
Member # 827

 - posted      Profile for katharina   Email katharina         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The topic itself is interesting (more interesting than the pissing contest) - how do you write a curriculum? Texas itself is a pretty conservative state - if the curriculum tilts conservative, is that wrong? Wouldn't it be more of an injustice to impose a curriculum that DOESN'T stem from/agree with its people? That could smack of the English discouraging learning Gaelic in Ireland, as an example.

I am interested in this for two reasons: 1) I went to school in Texas, and got, in my opinion, an excellent education. My final two years in Utah were basically repeats of my first two years of high school in Texas.

And, 2) I have a friend here in DC who works in education policy, and she's new to it, so she's really passionate and posts about it all the time on Facebook. She said a week or so ago that Texas has across the board among the best public schools in America, and it is only getting better. I didn't have a chance then to ask her for details, but this reminds me that I want to.

Posts: 26076 | Registered: Mar 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Christine
Member
Member # 8594

 - posted      Profile for Christine   Email Christine         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm not sure how to remove bias from history textbooks. The best you can do is present multiple viewpoints, but teachers are notoriously bad at being able to do this or to encourage reasonable discussion.

If it helps, I think most kids are more influenced by parents than by history classes, especially at the elementary and middle school level, when it's more about memorization than critical thinking.

Posts: 2392 | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Raymond Arnold
Member
Member # 11712

 - posted      Profile for Raymond Arnold   Email Raymond Arnold         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm curious which points people are particularly concerned about having a liberal bias.
Posts: 4136 | Registered: Aug 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
katharina
Member
Member # 827

 - posted      Profile for katharina   Email katharina         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
especially at the elementary and middle school level, when it's more about memorization than critical thinking.
This isn't true.
Posts: 26076 | Registered: Mar 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Jake
Member
Member # 206

 - posted      Profile for Jake           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
It was true of the history classes I had at those levels. I didn't have a history class that encouraged critical thinking until high school.
Posts: 1087 | Registered: Jul 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Tresopax
Member
Member # 1063

 - posted      Profile for Tresopax           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
I'm not sure how to remove bias from history textbooks. The best you can do is present multiple viewpoints, but teachers are notoriously bad at being able to do this or to encourage reasonable discussion.
Are they? I never found this to be true. It was true with certain few teachers, but not with most - at least those in history and english where those sorts of discussions were most important to the curriculum.
Posts: 8120 | Registered: Jul 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
katharina
Member
Member # 827

 - posted      Profile for katharina   Email katharina         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
It isn't true in Texas.
Posts: 26076 | Registered: Mar 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
mr_porteiro_head
Member
Member # 4644

 - posted      Profile for mr_porteiro_head   Email mr_porteiro_head         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The one history class I had in Texas was horrible. But then, it was taught by a coach.
Posts: 16551 | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
dkw
Member
Member # 3264

 - posted      Profile for dkw   Email dkw         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I suspect it varies by the teacher or the school, not by the state.
Posts: 9866 | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
katharina
Member
Member # 827

 - posted      Profile for katharina   Email katharina         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
It shouldn't - that's what the curriculum guidelines are for. It isn't just what to learn but how to learn it and what the students should be able to do with that knowledge.
Posts: 26076 | Registered: Mar 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Stephan
Member
Member # 7549

 - posted      Profile for Stephan   Email Stephan         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by dkw:
I suspect it varies by the teacher or the school, not by the state.

BEST STATEMENT YET

Yes, it really comes down to the teacher. It doesn't matter what is in the textbook. A good teacher doesn't teach from the textbook anyways.

When I taught history, I would go out of my way to find other sources. Articles, web sites, videos. Textbooks, especially pre-high school textbooks, are drivel.

Posts: 3134 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scifibum
Member
Member # 7625

 - posted      Profile for scifibum   Email scifibum         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I thought Texas was famous for gaming results of NCLB and other federal standards. Is there any good method of comparing schools across states, like one that isn't tied to incentives and doesn't rely on the people in the system to do the measurements?
Posts: 4287 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Stephan
Member
Member # 7549

 - posted      Profile for Stephan   Email Stephan         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
By the way, do any of the Canadians on board have access to a Canadian history textbook? The 8th graders are about to start a unit on the War of 1812, and I told one of the teachers I would track down the Canadian perspective.
Posts: 3134 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Scott R
Member
Member # 567

 - posted      Profile for Scott R   Email Scott R         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The Canadian perspective on the War of 1812:

"Hey! Hey, you hosers! It's ZED! ZED!!"

Posts: 14554 | Registered: Dec 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TomDavidson
Member
Member # 124

 - posted      Profile for TomDavidson   Email TomDavidson         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The Canadians regard 1812 as a victory over American aggression. Kate Beaton actually has some great webcomics about this. [Smile]
Posts: 37419 | Registered: May 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Geraine
Member
Member # 9913

 - posted      Profile for Geraine   Email Geraine         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Can we just agree that there are radicals on both sides of the isle? Conservapedia, DailyKoS, and other web sites do not represent a majority of conservatives or liberals.

Now to the issue:

I heard about this about 2 months ago on the radio. Every 10 years there is a meeting in Texas to talk about what is being taught in the schools. The unique thing about Texas is that the PARENTS play a huge part in these meetings. They have direct control in what they want their children taught. The school board essentially just mediates the whole thing. The article leaves that little bit of information out.

Posts: 1937 | Registered: Nov 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scifibum
Member
Member # 7625

 - posted      Profile for scifibum   Email scifibum         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Here's a resource:
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/military/025002-2000-e.html

Posts: 4287 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Mucus
Member
Member # 9735

 - posted      Profile for Mucus           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Geraine:
... Conservapedia, DailyKoS, and other web sites do not represent a majority of conservatives or liberals.

Interesting note about Conservapedia though, it is founded and controlled by Andrew Schlafly who is the son of Phyllis Schlafly from that amendment above:
quote:
one guideline requires publishers to include a section on “the conservative resurgence of the 1980s and 1990s, including Phyllis Schlafly, the Contract with America, the Heritage Foundation, the Moral Majority and the National Rifle Association.”
Additionally:
quote:
The "Eagle Forum University" online education program, which is associated with Phyllis Schlafly's organization Eagle Forum, uses material for various online courses, including U.S. history, stored on Conservapedia.[3][16][17] Editing of Conservapedia articles related to a particular course topic is also a certain assignment for Eagle Forum University students.[17]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conservapedia
Posts: 7593 | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Christine
Member
Member # 8594

 - posted      Profile for Christine   Email Christine         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Tresopax:
quote:
I'm not sure how to remove bias from history textbooks. The best you can do is present multiple viewpoints, but teachers are notoriously bad at being able to do this or to encourage reasonable discussion.
Are they? I never found this to be true. It was true with certain few teachers, but not with most - at least those in history and english where those sorts of discussions were most important to the curriculum.
I actually had some excellent high school history teachers who were able to encourage discussion and critical thinking. Elementary and middle school were entirely about memorization.

I do think a lot of teachers aren't good at this, however; as evidenced by the myriad teachers who assign "opinion" papers and then flunk the kids who offer the wrong opinion. I didn't personally run into this, but my brother did, my husband did, and so did a lot of others I've spoken to. I hope it's not the norm, but it is the sort of thing that is difficult to correct for at the state level and not the easiest thing to correct for at the school administrative level, if it's subtle.

Posts: 2392 | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Geraine
Member
Member # 9913

 - posted      Profile for Geraine   Email Geraine         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Mucus,

That is pretty interesting.

I don't agree with bias in any classroom, but if the parents are the ones choosing the cirriculum then so be it.

We have all had teachers that lean one way or the other and let it show. I hated my radically conservative professors just as much as my liberal professors. The best professors just presented the facts and let us make up our own minds, or would present both sides of the argument.

Posts: 1937 | Registered: Nov 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Samprimary
Member
Member # 8561

 - posted      Profile for Samprimary   Email Samprimary         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Some of the texas lawmakers who are directly trying to put what essentially equates to 'right wing propaganda' into these textbook curriculum requirements are pretty scary ideologues, but they are at least open and forthright about their intent.
Posts: 15417 | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scholarette
Member
Member # 11540

 - posted      Profile for scholarette           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Texas schools being the best in the nation makes me despair for this nation.
Posts: 2223 | Registered: Mar 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Samprimary
Member
Member # 8561

 - posted      Profile for Samprimary   Email Samprimary         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by scholarette:
Texas schools being the best in the nation makes me despair for this nation.

but texas isn't even in the top ten for public school system quality? where's this coming from?
Posts: 15417 | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
dkw
Member
Member # 3264

 - posted      Profile for dkw   Email dkw         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by katharina:
And, 2) I have a friend here in DC who works in education policy, and she's new to it, so she's really passionate and posts about it all the time on Facebook. She said a week or so ago that Texas has across the board among the best public schools in America, and it is only getting better. I didn't have a chance then to ask her for details, but this reminds me that I want to.

I hope you will ask for details, and share them. Every ranking I've seen puts Texas somewhere in the middle.
Posts: 9866 | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TomDavidson
Member
Member # 124

 - posted      Profile for TomDavidson   Email TomDavidson         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm a little baffled, myself. Texas is right in the middle, IIRC: in the low 20s on almost all rankings. The only reason I know this, in fact, is that the school where I work -- which is known for its Education programs -- actually trades on the quality of secondary education in Wisconsin, and so I've run into a couple workstudies who've actually come to Wisconsin from Texas to learn how to teach.

(Edited to add: I just did some searching on this, and it's possible that she's working from these numbers, shown in pretty graphic form here:
http://www.uschamber.com/reportcard/default
Personally, I'm going to take those with a major grain of salt, since the bias there is actually pretty open. But that's a likely source.)

Posts: 37419 | Registered: May 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
katharina
Member
Member # 827

 - posted      Profile for katharina   Email katharina         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by scholarette:
Texas schools being the best in the nation makes me despair for this nation.

You know, this is one of the stupidest and tackiest things I've ever read.
Posts: 26076 | Registered: Mar 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
MrSquicky
Member
Member # 1802

 - posted      Profile for MrSquicky   Email MrSquicky         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Why? Texas has middle of the pack schools. If that were the best that we could do, I'd despair for the nation as well.
Posts: 10177 | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scifibum
Member
Member # 7625

 - posted      Profile for scifibum   Email scifibum         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Really, if you think about it, anytime reality breaks to the point where middle of the pack = best (1 <> 1), we're all in a lot of trouble.
Posts: 4287 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Samprimary
Member
Member # 8561

 - posted      Profile for Samprimary   Email Samprimary         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by katharina:
quote:
Originally posted by scholarette:
Texas schools being the best in the nation makes me despair for this nation.

You know, this is one of the stupidest and tackiest things I've ever read.
Why? If Texas schools represented our nation's best state public schools, that would suck.
Posts: 15417 | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Belle
Member
Member # 2314

 - posted      Profile for Belle   Email Belle         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
If it helps, I think most kids are more influenced by parents than by history classes, especially at the elementary and middle school level, when it's more about memorization than critical thinking.
Whoa, whoa, whoa - I AM a middle school teacher and I take exception here. If you read any current literature out there about middle school curriculum design the emphasis is almost ENTIRELY on critical thinking and getting away from memorization. In fact, it's gotten to the point where if I do want kids to memorize something I almost feel like I have to apologize for it...or justify it in some way.

I know the social studies teachers feel the same pressure...we talk about it.

Posts: 14428 | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Stephan
Member
Member # 7549

 - posted      Profile for Stephan   Email Stephan         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Belle:
quote:
If it helps, I think most kids are more influenced by parents than by history classes, especially at the elementary and middle school level, when it's more about memorization than critical thinking.
Whoa, whoa, whoa - I AM a middle school teacher and I take exception here. If you read any current literature out there about middle school curriculum design the emphasis is almost ENTIRELY on critical thinking and getting away from memorization. In fact, it's gotten to the point where if I do want kids to memorize something I almost feel like I have to apologize for it...or justify it in some way.

I know the social studies teachers feel the same pressure...we talk about it.

Same here in Maryland. They want it taught more like a Reading/Language Arts class. Dig through the informational text, and form conclusions. I could get away having them memorize the preamble, especially if they were doing something like making a song out of it. But if I made them memorize terms and dates week after week, I would have got terrible evaluations.
Posts: 3134 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
BlackBlade
Member
Member # 8376

 - posted      Profile for BlackBlade   Email BlackBlade         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by MrSquicky:
Why? Texas has middle of the pack schools. If that were the best that we could do, I'd despair for the nation as well.

I think it's more she found such a direct insult to the state of Texas frustrating.

I'm inclined to agree, I wouldn't want any state put into that statement.

Posts: 14316 | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
scholarette
Member
Member # 11540

 - posted      Profile for scholarette           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Does it make it better that I am a Texan and my daughter will go to those schools? We game the system to look good, but then ignore the majority of students. I work part time with teachers and while they are awesome, the system is not. Though, to be fair, the kids I work with are almost exclusively the ones the system has failed for (which includes kids with genius IQ, mild autism, low self esteem or no real problems that I can see). So, I might be jaded.
Posts: 2223 | Registered: Mar 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Glenn Arnold
Member
Member # 3192

 - posted      Profile for Glenn Arnold   Email Glenn Arnold         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The current thing for social studies seems to be the "document based question" in which the students are required to answer questions based on their reading of a historical document. I imagine that you can cherry pick your document and ask a leading question, but even then the student has to use critical thinking skills. Might even backfire, since the student is likely to notice that the question is worded in an oddly specific manner.

One thing is for sure, conservatives have a well known conservative bias. This may seem redundant, but I've never heard of a liberal arguing for change simply so that things can be "more liberal." Rather, they argue for change because they believe that something could be better.

Posts: 3735 | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
MightyCow
Member
Member # 9253

 - posted      Profile for MightyCow           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by scifibum:
Really, if you think about it, anytime reality breaks to the point where middle of the pack = best (1 <> 1), we're all in a lot of trouble.

I guess it takes a Texas education to figure that one out. Everything is bigger in Texas, so average = #1!
Posts: 3950 | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
jebus202
Member
Member # 2524

 - posted      Profile for jebus202   Email jebus202         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by katharina:
Wouldn't it be more of an injustice to impose a curriculum that DOESN'T stem from/agree with its people? That could smack of the English discouraging learning Gaelic in Ireland, as an example.

In defense of the English, Irish is a pretty sucky language. Plus, no one here calls it Gaelic, as that sounds too much like a sexual act.
Posts: 3563 | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Synesthesia
Member
Member # 4774

 - posted      Profile for Synesthesia   Email Synesthesia         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by jebus202:
quote:
Originally posted by katharina:
Wouldn't it be more of an injustice to impose a curriculum that DOESN'T stem from/agree with its people? That could smack of the English discouraging learning Gaelic in Ireland, as an example.

In defense of the English, Irish is a pretty sucky language. Plus, no one here calls it Gaelic, as that sounds too much like a sexual act.
It does have way too many vowells that don't do what they should.

I'd just want history to be accurate. None of this America is perfect, Columbus discovered America sort of stuff I learned, but REAL history. Both sides, first hand sources. Urg! You have to look stuff up yourself in order to learn anything around here.

Posts: 9938 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Foust
Member
Member # 3043

 - posted      Profile for Foust   Email Foust         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
one guideline requires publishers to include a section on “the conservative resurgence of the 1980s and 1990s, including Phyllis Schlafly, the Contract with America, the Heritage Foundation, the Moral Majority and the National Rifle Association.”
Phyllis Schlafly? The Heritage Foundation? Way to completely shoot your students in the foot with irrelevant crap, Texas. These student's future university profs are going to have to do a lot of sighing and picking up of slack.
Posts: 1515 | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Sterling
Member
Member # 8096

 - posted      Profile for Sterling   Email Sterling         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm reminded of that standardized test I had to do back in high school with the question about "Which is the best system of government?"

I've never read a history textbook that didn't have its flaws, but if they're genuinely trying to skew towards a conservative viewpoint, that seems... Tacky, at best. And likely to backfire on them. I don't know a lot of people who are living with the lessons they learned in high school textbooks close to their heart.

Posts: 3825 | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Blayne Bradley
unregistered


 - posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Sterling:
I'm reminded of that standardized test I had to do back in high school with the question about "Which is the best system of government?"

Was this an essay or short answer question? An essay-ish question could be reasonably asked depending on the course where the answer in of itself isn't graded but your ability to write ana argument to justify you choice.
IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Sterling
Member
Member # 8096

 - posted      Profile for Sterling   Email Sterling         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Blayne Bradley:
quote:
Originally posted by Sterling:
I'm reminded of that standardized test I had to do back in high school with the question about "Which is the best system of government?"

Was this an essay or short answer question? An essay-ish question could be reasonably asked depending on the course where the answer in of itself isn't graded but your ability to write ana argument to justify you choice.
In this case, when I say "standardized test" what I mean is a test dictated by the government, not by any particular class in the school itself. And as far as creative answers, you're limited to how thoroughly you fill in your dot with a number 2 pencil.
Posts: 3825 | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
  This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.
UBB Code™ Images not permitted.
Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Hatrack River Home Page

Copyright © 2008 Hatrack River Enterprises Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.


Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2