Hatrack River
Home   |   About Orson Scott Card   |   News & Reviews   |   OSC Library   |   Forums   |   Contact   |   Links
Research Area   |   Writing Lessons   |   Writers Workshops   |   OSC at SVU   |   Calendar   |   Store
E-mail this page
Hatrack River Forum Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Hatrack River Forum » Active Forums » Books, Films, Food and Culture » What is your favorite 18/19th century Brit Lit novel and why?

   
Author Topic: What is your favorite 18/19th century Brit Lit novel and why?
Wendybird
Member
Member # 84

 - posted      Profile for Wendybird   Email Wendybird         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm getting ready to choose a novel for the final paper of my senior capstone class and I'm having a hard time choosing which novel to read!! Knowing that Hatrack is quite literary and smart I thought I'd ask -

What is your favorite 18th or 19th century British Literature and why?

Posts: 1091 | Registered: A Long Time Ago!  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TomDavidson
Member
Member # 124

 - posted      Profile for TomDavidson   Email TomDavidson         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
*blink*
That's a period of two hundred years. I mean, it literally covers everything from the Augustans through the Gothics and Victorians to the beginning of the modern era.

Posts: 36761 | Registered: May 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kmbboots
Member
Member # 8576

 - posted      Profile for kmbboots   Email kmbboots         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Heck. Even detective novels and science fiction and fantasy. My favorites would probably be Jane Eyre or Tale of Two Cities but those are sort of obvious. As is Wuthering Heights though in any of those there would be an awful lot to write about. I wouldn't recommend Austen unless you are very fond as the thematic fruit doesn't hang quite so low. Or you could do something like Alice which would be a bit different. So many choices!

[ September 30, 2012, 12:50 AM: Message edited by: kmbboots ]

Posts: 10411 | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Jeff C.
Member
Member # 12496

 - posted      Profile for Jeff C.           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
A particular novel that you might find interesting is Varney the Vampire, which also served as the primary source for most of our modern day vampire interpretations (the vampire in this novel had two fangs, left marks on the neck, hypnotized people, etc), so it might make for an interesting paper if you need one. It was also written several decades before Dracula, which is interesting.

There's also Frankenstein, which is a true classic.

You've also got the entirety of Jane Austen's work. I wouldn't recommend any of it. It's dreadfully boring, unless you enjoy reading about rich people falling in and out of love. The more interesting story is Austen herself, who died at the age of 41 and had only published four novels (each of which you most certainly have heard of). The fact that she is still a household name and each published book has seen dozens of adaptations is really impressive. Still, I must say I find them absolutely boring (*raises monocle*).

Hope that helps!

Posts: 1241 | Registered: Feb 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Destineer
Member
Member # 821

 - posted      Profile for Destineer           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
It would have to be something by George Eliot. The competition is not even close. Probably Middlemarch. It's a saga where every piece fits perfectly into the whole. And what an inspiring, virtuous, yet believable female protagonist Dorothea is. Daniel Deronda is also excellent, but Middlemarch...

Have to disagree about Austin. I've only read P&P, but it is a delight.

Posts: 4347 | Registered: Mar 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TomDavidson
Member
Member # 124

 - posted      Profile for TomDavidson   Email TomDavidson         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
What is your capstone project? How long does it have to be? Can it be about ANYTHING, as long as it touches on the summer of British letters?
Posts: 36761 | Registered: May 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Graeme
Member
Member # 12543

 - posted      Profile for Graeme           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Pride and Prejudice. Romance done well.
Posts: 42 | Registered: Apr 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lyrhawn
Member
Member # 7039

 - posted      Profile for Lyrhawn   Email Lyrhawn         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The only thing I've read by Jane Austen is Persuasion, and I was surprised by how long I liked it. I normally HATE this period of British literature, I just find all of it incredibly dull, boring, uninteresting, you name it. But I've managed to find a couple that are more than tolerable. Austen is witty and funny.

Heart of Darkness is probably my favorite of the 19th century though. I latched onto it in high school and I've never really let go.

I didn't even read a Dickens novel until a few years ago for a British literature class, I think we read Oliver Twist, and I was surprised by how good that was as well. After reading a couple of Dickens' novels, I'm convinced he was reincarnated as Stephen Colbert.

quote:
You've also got the entirety of Jane Austen's work. I wouldn't recommend any of it. It's dreadfully boring, unless you enjoy reading about rich people falling in and out of love.
This seems a more apt description of an Edith Wharton novel.
Posts: 21041 | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Szymon
Member
Member # 7103

 - posted      Profile for Szymon   Email Szymon         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I, as a non native, simply loved Great Expectations. Not that I read much more... In English, that is.

Ah, and why. I like the humor very much. And I learned what wittles are.

Posts: 587 | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Szymon
Member
Member # 7103

 - posted      Profile for Szymon   Email Szymon         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Or is?
Posts: 587 | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Orincoro
Member
Member # 8854

 - posted      Profile for Orincoro   Email Orincoro         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Jsou kolektivní plurálu. Are.
Posts: 9350 | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Szymon
Member
Member # 7103

 - posted      Profile for Szymon   Email Szymon         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
A, skoro tak, to dobra. Bo myślałem, że wittles jak victuals, ale w sumie po polsku też jest wiktuały w liczbie mnogiej. Głupi jestem.
Posts: 587 | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Szymon
Member
Member # 7103

 - posted      Profile for Szymon   Email Szymon         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Now lookee here," he said, "the question being whether you're to be let to live. You know what a file is?"

"Yes, sir."

"And you know what wittles is?"

"Yes, sir."

That's why I hesitated.

Posts: 587 | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
rivka
Member
Member # 4859

 - posted      Profile for rivka   Email rivka         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The poor grammar (and pronunciation) is deliberate on the part of the author. Not so much on the part of the character. [Wink]
Posts: 32919 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Szymon
Member
Member # 7103

 - posted      Profile for Szymon   Email Szymon         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
That's why I hesitated. But now I know, as I explained. Don't you speak west slavic languages ?!
Posts: 587 | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
rivka
Member
Member # 4859

 - posted      Profile for rivka   Email rivka         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Some days, I barely speak English.
Posts: 32919 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Szymon
Member
Member # 7103

 - posted      Profile for Szymon   Email Szymon         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Because of speaking too much or having no wish to speak at all? Or other reason.

Last night me and my fiancee wondered how to spell "we had" in Polish. "Mieliśmy" or "mięliśmy". Apparently the second form means "we crimped". So, I really barely speak Polish some days...

Posts: 587 | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
rivka
Member
Member # 4859

 - posted      Profile for rivka   Email rivka         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Szymon:
Because of speaking too much or having no wish to speak at all?

I was kidding. So no actual reason was implied.
Posts: 32919 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Samprimary
Member
Member # 8561

 - posted      Profile for Samprimary   Email Samprimary         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Posts: 13051 | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Szymon
Member
Member # 7103

 - posted      Profile for Szymon   Email Szymon         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Samprimary:
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Bildungsroman?
Posts: 587 | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Dr Strangelove
Member
Member # 8331

 - posted      Profile for Dr Strangelove   Email Dr Strangelove         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
For me, the answer is always going to be Tale of Two Cities, but I also am slightly biased as my field of study is Britain and France during the 1790's. Dickens in general though is hard to trump, and I think that's one of the more accessible of his works (as in not 100000 pages long).
Posts: 2826 | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Orincoro
Member
Member # 8854

 - posted      Profile for Orincoro   Email Orincoro         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Szymon:
A, skoro tak, to dobra. Bo myślałem, że wittles jak victuals, ale w sumie po polsku też jest wiktuały w liczbie mnogiej. Głupi jestem.

No jo, samrozřeme v obecnou starou angličtině používali singulárni příjmemu např: they is, ale co se týká písemni akorát are je lepší.
Posts: 9350 | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Szymon
Member
Member # 7103

 - posted      Profile for Szymon   Email Szymon         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
No lepszy, lepszy. Tylko Dickens właśnie mieszał ten pisemny z mówionym ile wlezie.

A tak na marginesie, czy polski dla Czechów też jest taki śmieszny jak czeski dla Polaków? [Smile]

Posts: 587 | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Wendybird
Member
Member # 84

 - posted      Profile for Wendybird   Email Wendybird         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
You can see my difficulty in choosing Tom! I was originally leaning toward Tale of Two Cities and may approach it from a historical perspective or maybe a feminist one.

There is just SO much during this time period and we aren't supposed to pick something we've done before which rules out Frankenstein, several Jane Austen, Great Expectations and a few others not coming to mind right away.

I hadn't thought of Alice in Wonderland. That would be interesting. This instructor also teaches a Literature in Film class that I took and enjoyed thoroughly. Alice would give quite a bit of material from a film standpoint as well as a literary one.

I'm not very good at narrowing down my choices and coming up with topics on my own. Other than a list of major authors of the time period we are left entirely to our own in deciding a topic. The official instructions say "Your paper should be on a topic from the approved list of nineteenth and twentieth century authors, focused so that it can be developed in a paper of eight to ten pages."

To stay on track for graduation I need to get something decided by Weds and my prospectus finished by Monday so I can get the paper written and submitted by the first week in Nov. Eek!

Posts: 1091 | Registered: A Long Time Ago!  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Orincoro
Member
Member # 8854

 - posted      Profile for Orincoro   Email Orincoro         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Szymone, ja bych řekl že je to bylo rozdilně žertovný. Zatímco nejsem čech, vím že pro čechy vlastní je polsky pravopis. U vás, čeština zdá dětinský, a u nas, českych mluvicích, polština vypada jako opily čestina.
Posts: 9350 | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kmbboots
Member
Member # 8576

 - posted      Profile for kmbboots   Email kmbboots         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Who is on the list of approved authors. That might narrow it down a bit.
Posts: 10411 | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Orincoro
Member
Member # 8854

 - posted      Profile for Orincoro   Email Orincoro         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Oh and for you lookie-loos who will look up what I said on google translate- it's not going to make much sense. I'm not using a dictionary or anything, so I made a few mistakes, but likely Syzmon gets it because it isn't actually that complicated.
Posts: 9350 | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lyrhawn
Member
Member # 7039

 - posted      Profile for Lyrhawn   Email Lyrhawn         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm not even sure what language to look up.

Is that Czech?

Posts: 21041 | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Orincoro
Member
Member # 8854

 - posted      Profile for Orincoro   Email Orincoro         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
He's using Polish, I'm using Czech. He asked me if Polish was as funny to Czechs as Czech is to the Polish. My answer was that it's differently funny: to Polish people, Czech sounds like babytalk, and to Czechs, Poles sound drunk.
Posts: 9350 | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Darth_Mauve
Member
Member # 4709

 - posted      Profile for Darth_Mauve   Email Darth_Mauve         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I actually recently began Jane Eyre in a condensed form. (It was in a Readers Digest Great Reads book I got for the Horatio Hornblower story, and I hate to leave anything unread.) I find it much better than I thought it would be.

However, since the paper is due by the end of the year, consider a seasonal "A Christmas Carol". Just don't talk about the part where Kermit the Frog kisses Ms. Piggy. I think they'll catch on that you didn't quite read the story.

Posts: 1781 | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Wendybird
Member
Member # 84

 - posted      Profile for Wendybird   Email Wendybird         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Here is the alphabetical list. I don't want something done by a million other undergrad students but I don't want something so obscure its going to be difficult to find resources. I live near the U of A and can utilize their library if needed but online resources are easier for me. There is just too much to choose from!

Arnold, Matthew (1822-1888)
Auden, Wystan Hugh (1907-1973)
Austen, Jane (1775-1817)
Barrie, James Matthew (1860-1937)
Beckett, Samuel (1906-1989)
Brontë, Emily (1818-1848)
Brontë, Charlotte (1816-1855)
Brooke, Rupert (1887-1915)
Browning, Elizabeth Barrett (1806-1861)
Browning, Robert (1812-1889)
Burnett, Frances (Eliza) Hodgson (1849-1924)
Carlyle, Thomas (1795-1881)
Carroll, Lewis [Charles Lutwidge Dodgson] (1832-1898)
Clough, Arthur Hugh (1819-1861)
Conrad, Joseph (1857-1950)
de la Mare, Walter (1873-1956)
Dickens, Charles (1812-1870)
Dowson, Ernest (1867-1900)
Eliot, George (1819-1880)
Eliot, Thomas Sterns (1888-1965)
Fitzgerald, Edward (1809-1883)
Forster, Edward Morgan (1879-1970)
Gilbert, W. S. (1836-1911)
Golding, William Gerald (1911-93)
Greene, Graham (1904-1991)
Hardy, Thomas (1840-1928)
Henley, William Ernest (1849-1903)
Hopkins, Gerard Manley (1844-1889)
Housman, A. E. (1859-1936)
Huxley, Thomas Henry (1825-1895)
Joyce, James (1882-1941)
Kipling, Rudyard (1865-1936)
Lawrence, D. H. (1885-1930)
Lear, Edward (1812-1888)
Lessing, Doris (1919-)
Lewis, Clive Staples (1898-1963)
Mansfield, Katherine (1888-1923)
Maugham, William Somerset (1874-1966)
Meredith, George (1828-1909)
Mill, John Stuart (1806-1873)
Morris, William (1834-1860)
Newman, John Henry Cardinal (1801-1890)
Orwell, George [Eric Arthur Blair] (1903-1940)
Owen, Wilford (1893-1918)
Pater, Walter (1839-1894)
Rossetti, Christina (1830-1894)
Rossetti, Dante Gabriel (1828-1882)
Ruskin, John (1819-1900)
Sassoon, Siegfried (1886-1937)
Shaw, Bernard (1856-1950)
Sitwell, Edith (1887-1964)
Stevenson, Robert Louis (1850-1894)
Swinburne, Algernon Charles (1837-1909)
Symons, Arthur William (1865-1945)
Tennyson, Alfred Lord (1809-1892)
Thackeray, William Makepeace (1811-1863)
Thomas, Dylan (1914-1953)
Thompson, Francis (1859-1907)
von Arnim, Elizabeth (1866-1941)
Waugh, Evelyn (1903-1967)
Wells, Herbert George (1866-1946)
Wilde, Oscar (1854-1900)
Woolf, Virginia (1882-1941)
Yeats, William Butler (1865-1939)

Posts: 1091 | Registered: A Long Time Ago!  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Wendybird
Member
Member # 84

 - posted      Profile for Wendybird   Email Wendybird         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
DM - but that is my favorite part of the story heehee [Wink]
Posts: 1091 | Registered: A Long Time Ago!  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Aros
Member
Member # 4873

 - posted      Profile for Aros           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
David Copperfield FTW.
Posts: 1075 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lyrhawn
Member
Member # 7039

 - posted      Profile for Lyrhawn   Email Lyrhawn         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Darth_Mauve:
I actually recently began Jane Eyre in a condensed form. (It was in a Readers Digest Great Reads book I got for the Horatio Hornblower story, and I hate to leave anything unread.) I find it much better than I thought it would be.

I can't stand Jane Eyre.

I prefer the prequel.

Posts: 21041 | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Szymon
Member
Member # 7103

 - posted      Profile for Szymon   Email Szymon         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Ori, it's not only baby talk, it's that the words mean almost the same thing, but they change the general... podtext? kontekst? of the sentence. You wrote "pouzivali", and in Polish in means "they made some fun of" (the po- prefix means "some") even though it also means "they used" at the same time. Or "detinsky" (in Polish "dziecinny", "detinsky" sounds like a made-up word) I dunno how to explain it, it's just hilarious. The similarity of meaning and complete difference in context tone is unbelivable.

I understand everything you write, although for me it's impossible to write anything in Czech. Není to?

Posts: 587 | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Orincoro
Member
Member # 8854

 - posted      Profile for Orincoro   Email Orincoro         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
It's the same for me with Polish. I can read it, but it's weird. Like "tak na marginiese" makes perfect sense, but it sounds completely made up at the same time.
Posts: 9350 | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Szymon
Member
Member # 7103

 - posted      Profile for Szymon   Email Szymon         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
By the way, what are the best Czech books and authors, according to you? I only know Kafka and Hasek. What would you recommend?
Posts: 587 | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kmbboots
Member
Member # 8576

 - posted      Profile for kmbboots   Email kmbboots         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Darth_Mauve:
I actually recently began Jane Eyre in a condensed form. (It was in a Readers Digest Great Reads book I got for the Horatio Hornblower story, and I hate to leave anything unread.) I find it much better than I thought it would be.

I read that when I was 8 or so. I was sick and stayed up all night. Bertha Rochester had me so disturbed that I read all of My Friend Flicka (in the same volume - was it the green one?) that night, too.
Posts: 10411 | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Darth_Mauve
Member
Member # 4709

 - posted      Profile for Darth_Mauve   Email Darth_Mauve         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
KM--same volume. Flicka is next.
Wendy, you have George Orwell on that list. He's a 20th century author. He was a contemporary of Tolkien.

Posts: 1781 | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Aros
Member
Member # 4873

 - posted      Profile for Aros           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
There are a bunch of 20th century authors on that list and a bunch that published in both the 19th and 20th centuries. You'd have to go by date published of the book.
Posts: 1075 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Aros
Member
Member # 4873

 - posted      Profile for Aros           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
French author from that period would either be Dumas (Count of Monte Cristo) or Hugo (Les Miserables).
Posts: 1075 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TomDavidson
Member
Member # 124

 - posted      Profile for TomDavidson   Email TomDavidson         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
What's interesting is that none of those authors are from the 18th century. Are you sure you weren't told to do 19th-20th century authors? [Smile]
Posts: 36761 | Registered: May 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kmbboots
Member
Member # 8576

 - posted      Profile for kmbboots   Email kmbboots         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Since Barrie is on the list, obviously you should do Peter Pan.
Posts: 10411 | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Wendybird
Member
Member # 84

 - posted      Profile for Wendybird   Email Wendybird         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I apologize! It is 19th and 20th century. I should know better than to trust my very faulty memory!

KMB- yes Peter Pan would be the obvious choice [Big Grin]

I think I am going to do a few short stories from Katherine Mansfield. Specifically "Miss Brill", "The Garden Party" and "Bliss". Need to do a bit more research and formulate my prospectus.

Posts: 1091 | Registered: A Long Time Ago!  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.
UBB Code™ Images not permitted.
Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Hatrack River Home Page

Copyright © 2008 Hatrack River Enterprises Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.


Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2