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Author Topic: Awesome classical music moments
Sa'eed
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When I listen to classical there are certain parts in certain works I always look forward to...they're just so intense and moving. I find myself revisiting over and over again on youtube.

Like the climax of the first movement of the sibelius violin concerto...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsbrRAgv1b4#t=14m28s

Or this part in the middle movement of the guitar concerto by the 20th century Spanish composer Rodrigo, where a solo section leads to a searing and powerful restatement of the main melody from orchestra (the moment happens at 8:29, but wait for it.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBHfPh5Ibsk#t=6m50s

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Sa'eed
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From the opera "Fidelio." The villain plots. I saw a dvd of a different production back in 2004 and I still remember this aria...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sf6ykkb2aOw

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Wingracer
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There are so many great moments but two that particularly stand out for me are the simple gifts variations at the end of Copland's Appalachian Spring and the third movement of Borodin's 2nd string quartet.
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millernumber1
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Agree about Appalachian Spring, Wingracer! I also love the cadences in the second movement of Beethoven's fifth symphony, the opening bars of the Firebird finale by Stravinsky, the opening bars of the Gigue by Bach from his French Suite 5, and the beginning of the Serenade for Winds by Mozart.
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Wingracer
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Good choices but I could fill a whole page with Bach moments. [Big Grin]

I think I might be a bit of an oddball since it's Beethoven's 7th symphony that gets me. 5th and 9th are great but give me the 7th any day.

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millernumber1
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Yes, Bach moments are also extremely numerous for me. [Smile] 7 is great - but then, so is 6. [Smile] Also I forgot to mention many Dvorak moments, such as the first bars of the 7th symphony, and of course, the fanfare from the last movement of New World. [Big Grin]
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Wingracer
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Then there is this:

tchaikovsky violin concerto

I've always loved that melody that starts around 1:15. Especially when the entire orchestra picks it up at 6:45. Mind = blown. I just wish it appeared a bit more often.

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Wingracer
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quote:
Originally posted by millernumber1:
so is 6. [Smile]

Speaking of the 6th, I freaking LOVE Glen Gould's recording of the Liszt piano transcription:

Symphony #6

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Wingracer
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God I love Borodin. Here's his 2nd symphony. All of it is great but 18:54 is the heart stopping moment.

Borodin's 2nd symphony

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Sa'eed
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quote:
Originally posted by Wingracer:
quote:
Originally posted by millernumber1:
so is 6. [Smile]

Speaking of the 6th, I freaking LOVE Glen Gould's recording of the Liszt piano transcription:

Symphony #6

I've been aware of these, but they all sound very diminished. I could see the need for these in the 19th century when people didn't have record and cd players, and maybe today if you want to play them yourself but why would anyone listen to these over regular performances? [Dont Know]
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Lyrhawn
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The climax of Beethoven's 7th, Second movement, the allegretto. At the premiere performance back in the 19th century, the audience demanded the orchestra repeat it. It's easy to see why.

O Mio Babbino caro about halfway through when she hits the high notes.

Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis The whole thing is beautiful and emotionally stirring, but right around 2:20 is when it really swells, and the part at 2:30 gets me every time. Same with the part at 2:52 to about 3:12.

Vivaldi's Four Seasons have a lot of those moments. in "Summer" III. Presto, a little less than 2/3rds of the way through when the high violin kicks in. Same thing in "Autumn" III. Allegro.

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Lyrhawn
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quote:
Originally posted by millernumber1:
Yes, Bach moments are also extremely numerous for me. [Smile] 7 is great - but then, so is 6. [Smile] Also I forgot to mention many Dvorak moments, such as the first bars of the 7th symphony, and of course, the fanfare from the last movement of New World. [Big Grin]

I like the allegro con fuoco, but I feel like it unfairly overshadows the scherzo right before it, as least as far as general popularity goes. If I had to pick between them, I'd be hard pressed.
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Sa'eed
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The final few minutes of Mahler's Resurrection symphony...I saw this live a few a years ago and it was sublime.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdc5n562zZg#t=1h26m45s

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Dogbreath
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quote:
Originally posted by Lyrhawn:
The climax of Beethoven's 7th, Second movement, the allegretto. At the premiere performance back in the 19th century, the audience demanded the orchestra repeat it. It's easy to see why.

It's pretty incredible.

For the past two years I've been haunted by this music, though I must confess I don't know who wrote it or if it's even part of a larger work. I know very little about Classical music.

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Lyrhawn
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quote:
Originally posted by Sa'eed:
The final few minutes of Mahler's Resurrection symphony...I saw this live a few a years ago and it was sublime.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdc5n562zZg#t=1h26m45s

The fourth movement is absolutely beautiful. The third is a great piece of music too. I haven't listened to the whole thing all the way through in years.

I've been listening to Mozarts Requiem symphony a lot lately. I used to get them mixed up all the time when I was a kid. Just the names, obviously they sound way different.

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Sa'eed
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quote:
Originally posted by millernumber1:
Agree about Appalachian Spring, Wingracer! I also love the cadences in the second movement of Beethoven's fifth symphony, the opening bars of the Firebird finale by Stravinsky, the opening bars of the Gigue by Bach from his French Suite 5, and the beginning of the Serenade for Winds by Mozart.

One of my favorite albums is a collection of Copland's works including Appalachian Springs and Rodeo (which includes Hoedown aka Beef It's What's for Dinner.)
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Sa'eed
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Several years ago I saw snippets of Ken Burns' "The War." This peace kept playing in the background. It's pretty haunting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0PedB0DWay0

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Lyrhawn
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A slight departure into opera: Alfredo Kraus and Barry McDaniel singing Au fond du temple saint from Bizet's the Pearlfishers. It's a beautiful piece of music, but it hits its first big crescendo starting at the 3:20 mark. And again at the 6:05 mark. That 45 second or so stretch is pretty powerful.

As a follow up, Kraus singing Je crois entendre encore (also from the Pearlfishers) is maybe one of the most powerful, heart-rending pieces of music I've ever heard.


quote:
Originally posted by millernumber1:
Agree about Appalachian Spring, Wingracer! I also love the cadences in the second movement of Beethoven's fifth symphony, the opening bars of the Firebird finale by Stravinsky, the opening bars of the Gigue by Bach from his French Suite 5, and the beginning of the Serenade for Winds by Mozart.

Stravinsky has an embarrassment of riches when it comes to WOW moments in his music. The Firebird Suite has a few of them. "Rite of Spring" has a few as well. For Firebird, the beginning is great, the climax is great, the end is great. Beautiful all around.
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Wingracer
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quote:
Originally posted by Sa'eed:
I've been aware of these, but they all sound very diminished. I could see the need for these in the 19th century when people didn't have record and cd players, and maybe today if you want to play them yourself but why would anyone listen to these over regular performances? [Dont Know]

I actually agree with you on that but there is just something about that Gould recording that really works for me. The rest I could do without.

quote:
Originally posted by Lyrhawn:

Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis The whole thing is beautiful and emotionally stirring, but right around 2:20 is when it really swells, and the part at 2:30 gets me every time. Same with the part at 2:52 to about 3:12.


Completely agree. One of my all time favorites.
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Wingracer
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quote:
Originally posted by Dogbreath:

For the past two years I've been haunted by this music, though I must confess I don't know who wrote it or if it's even part of a larger work. I know very little about Classical music.

The music at the beginning of that vid is probably John Tavener. Here's Tavener's Funeral Canticle from Tree of Life:

Funeral Canticle

Unfortunately Tavener passed away just last week.

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Wingracer
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Speaking of Copland, airport stays need more fanfare:

Fanfare for the Common Man

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