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» Hatrack River Writers Workshop » Forums » Fragments and Feedback for Short Works » THE KABBALIST: A MADNESS MOST DISCREET (12K) (Page 1)

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Author Topic: THE KABBALIST: A MADNESS MOST DISCREET (12K)
History
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Good Shabbos.
My most recent KABBALIST story that I will not be sending to WOTF--because my type of peculiar doesn't play well in Peoria. (I also tend to write stories with word counts that eliminate them from nearly all markets. I must have missed the tribal merchant gene. [Wink] )

Gist of the tale:
Rabbi Cane moves to Boston to start over,
but his past catches up with him.
He confronts the walking dead, nuclear weapons, and the devil.
Welcome to Bean town, Rabbi.


THE FIRST 10:

“There were fresh sets of Charles’ fingerprints all over the lab, Jack.”

Nu? It’s his lab.”

Was his lab. Charles died last week.”

I paused while pouring her tea. Lt Col Helen Schwartz of the Defense Intelligence Agency was a stocky brunette, muscular not zaftig. Her nose was a bit large for her face and had a slight crook, but it gave her a distinct Romanesque beauty. She’d cut her hair short. I wasn’t sure I liked it. I handed her the cup, black with two sugars.

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob

[ November 26, 2011, 07:12 PM: Message edited by: History ]

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snapper
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I like everything but the...

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob


It appears to not fit.

One question for you; is the brief synopsis for our benefit or is that for the reader - a catching up of what's happened before?

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Dame
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Hi,

Quite a confusing post there. When the story gets going I like it. Obviously intelligent and with attitude.

I think you need some dialogue tags at the start.

No idea what "Nu" is, nor zaftig. I kind of like them, and am interested to find out what the culture is, but could easily get frustrated and bored if there are too many more.

So, Charles is dead, yet his fingerprints have appeared recently all over his lab? If so, its a great hook, not very clearly presented.

What is the word count? It doesn't seem as if you want to make things easy for the reader. While I love not feeling patronised, and am always keen to get my mental teeth (??) into juicy, clever new ideas I think you may be setting too many barriers between me and an easier enjoyment of your work.

Good luck with it. [Smile]

D

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annepin
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I liked this quite a bit. It's got a very strong voice that evokes a noir-type mystery. I like the way that you set it up, giving us both plot information and characterization.
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Merlion-Emrys
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I like it. Good voice, good foreshadowing. Maybe a little heavy on character description for some, though it doesn't really bother me

However, if the "gist" isn't actually part of the opening it doesn't look to me like you've got 13 lines.

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History
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I apologize for the confusion.

THE GIST:
I provided the "gist" (i.e. the substance essence) of the plot as a courtesy. Consider it a back-cover blurb (do novelettes have back covers?) [Smile]

Thus:"No", Snapper. I appreciate those of you who have read all or part of my other KABBALIST tales and novel, but this one actually precedes them all chronologically. Here Rabbi Cane has just arrived in Boston. He hasn't even fully unpacked before being caught up in more meshuggenes (craziness). Characters who are prominent in the later tales are first introduced here, but they are secondary in MADNESS. It is my intent is for each tale to stand alone but together provide a gestalt of entertainment (they do for me, it seems; I love revisiting these characters).

YIDDISH:
I choose common Yiddish words in many of my stories, many actually now acquired by the English language. But I appreciate that they may be still unknown to many. I strive to make them understood by context. Thus in describing Helen as a full-bodied, full-figured woman, she is "stocky" rather than "zaftig"(plump).
Similarly "Nu?" is "So?".

Merilon,
Yes. Other Members have similarly noted that stylistically I tend to write short novels rather than short stories. If I ever earn an editor, he or she will come at my work with ginsu knives--or perhaps a weed-wacker. However, I don't include words for the sake of words. They all have a purpose in the story (at least to me).

I stopped at less than 13 because I would have stopped in mid-sentence in the next frame of the scene. This was cleaner.

Dame,
The word count is 12K. (Sorry. Excluded it with the edits).

THE OPENING:
This story actually opens with a quote from Act 1 Scene 1 of ROMEO AND JULIET, from which the story's title is derived. You can find this here: http://nfs.sparknotes.com/romeojuliet/page_22.html

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob
(Courtesy, Snapper, courtesy. [Smile] Thank you all).

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redux
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I liked this opening.

My sole nitpick is that it should be "brunette" and not "brunet." The distinction being female versus male (same rule for blonde vs blond).

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snapper
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Nice catch redux. The word bothered me but I didn't do the 30 seconds of research required to find out why.

I have no problem with your usage of yiddish, History. Harry Turtledove does it quite often, and like you, he sets it up so I can make an accurate guess of its meaning.

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Kathleen Dalton Woodbury
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And here I thought "zaftig" meant something more like "pleasingly plump" or even "well-endowed" and not so much "stocky."

I vote for the Yiddish. That's how Rabbi Cane and associates would talk, right? Not that all Rabbis use Yiddish. (If I remember correctly, it's used more among the Ashkenazi and not at all among the Sephardic Jews--please correct me if I'm wrong.) But it puts this reader, at least, soundly into the scene.

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History
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Zaftig does mean "plump", Kathleen.

Cane is qualifying his use of "stocky" in regard to Lt Col Schwarz. She's muscular and solidly built, not pleasantly plump. She's a literal 'hardass', as it were.

stock·y (stk)
1. Solidly built; sturdy.
2. Chubby; plump
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/stocky

As for "brunet", it means the same as "brunette."
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/brunet
It is merely more stocky form. [Wink]
But if it bothers too many of you, I'll change it.

Yes, Kathleen. Yiddish was the community language of the Ashkenazi Jews of Eastern Europe. Ladino was that of Sephardic Jews. Following expulsions and migrations from Spain and then Portugal and, in more recent history, from North Africa and Muslim majority nations, Ladino speakers have become uncommon and the language is on the verge of going extinct. Yiddish, oddly enough, is in a modest revival; and many words have been assimilated into modern English. Just as an fyi, I was taught Sephardic Hebrew in Hebrew school, yet all my teachers (and family) were Ashkenazi Jewish immigrants, so it was mixed with some Yiddish as well. This fits the unshared backstory of my Rabbi protagonist. [Smile]

I'm in the process of cleaning the story up having received initial feedback. Don't know what I'll do (or can do) with it. It's a longer story than usually shared here, but if someone would like to read it and offer additional comments, let me know.

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob

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Kathleen Dalton Woodbury
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Thank you, Dr. Bob.

As for brunet vs brunette, could the distinction be considered politicially incorrect because it's sexist?

I'd recommend using "brunette" because it's the more common spelling in the US (at least as far as I know).

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History
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Like "actor" (male or female) vs. "actress," Kathleen?
I don't know.
But as this seems to knock people here out of the story, I'll make the change.
Thank you.

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob

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Kathleen Dalton Woodbury
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Exactly what I was thinking of.

I have mixed emotions about political correctness anyway, because I think it can become a form of censorship. But I think it's better not to use words to create distinctions when such distinctions aren't necessary.

And I submit that if you're going to risk knocking people out of the story with words, it should be Yiddish words that they should go look up anyway, and not with more or less esoteric spellings of words that have more common versions.

Increase your readers' vocabularies with interesting and fun words.

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redux
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Brunette is a word adopted from the French language which has gender specific adjectives.

I'm not sure about the "political correctness" angle or whether the gender distinction bothers anyone.

As to the Yiddish - not knowing what a particular word means has never bothered me. I just reach for the dictionary or Google it. Reading, besides being a form of entertainment, has also provided me with a way of expanding my vocabulary.

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History
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Thank you, Kathleen.

You're the true mensch of our Hatrack mishpocha. [Smile]

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob

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Kathleen Dalton Woodbury
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Thank you, Dr. Bob. Mensch is an honor I can only aspire to, but I appreciate your kindness in thinking I might qualify.
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History
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You're welcome, Kathleen.

For those who wish to similarly expand their vocabulary:

mensch is literally "person", but specifically, a person of integrity and honor. [See:
http://www.jewishealing.com/theartofthemensch.html]

mishpocha is "family", specifically an extended family.

As there has been no takers on this story (and I respect it is a busy time of the year for many, and this is a longer tale at 12K), I'll print it and send it out this weekend.
Wish me mazel. [Smile]

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob

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Merlion-Emrys
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Where are you sending it, specifically?
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History
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Per Duotrope, the only magazine that may consider a story of this type and length is F&SF.

That I should start with the premier professional publication in the genre is the opportunity to share with you another common Yiddish world:

chutzpah [Smile]

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob

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Merlion-Emrys
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You can also try Intergalactic Medicine Show, as far as pro markets go.
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History
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Thank you very much, Merilyn.

Based on my perusal of IGMS, I'm uncertain if my KABBALIST stories are a good fit (both in genre and length).
If (likely when) F&S sends me another rejection letter, I'll think about IGMS.

Any other suggestions would be welcome.

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob

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Kathleen Dalton Woodbury
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You never know. Chutzpah can bring miracles.
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History
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We shall see, Kathleen.
Additional critiques or mere readers welcome.

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob

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InarticulateBabbler
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Send it on to me.
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History
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Hmm. F&SF and IGMS both passed. Unless anyone has suggestions of other possible markets for 10K urban fantasy tales, this goes on the shelf (until I complete a few more to at least create an anthology of Kabbalist stories for self-pub).

And if you still have suggestions, Babbler, I'd welcome them.

Time to write something different, I guess.

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob

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LDWriter2
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Hmm, obviously not Babbler here, And I haven't read all the posts here but I know of one market that wants stores over 10,000 words. They pay one hundred if I recall correctly. If they are still in business.

I know there's another one but can't think of it right now.

I forget what you have said in the way of e-publishing so I apologize if this has been said and rejected already but if no on wants them because of the style and/or length do it yourself.

Put together a three to five story set of 10,000 plus word KABBALIST tales would attract attention at least. I would buy a set and help to push them--even though that last may not mean much.

As long as you don't make them over six dollars of course [Smile]

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History
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You are very kind, LD.

If you recall the name/link of the market you think I could send the story to, please let me know.

For completed Kabbalist "shorts" I have the two novelettes A MADNESS MOST DISCREET and THAT I SHALL HEARKEN TO HIS VOICE (prequels to the novel) and a short OTP trigger piece entitled SACRED GEOMETRY for a combined ~35K words.

I stopped working on a post-novel novella entitled ALL'S FAIR, and put on hold two Kabbalist short stories in order to attempt something more mainstream--and hopefully more publishable. Unfortunately, there does not seem to be a market for Yiddishkeit urban fantasy.

At your encouragement, I did submit a near flash piece (a flash and a half [Wink] ) to snapper's trigger challenge in honor of Nick Tchan's WOTF winning steampunk golem story. This has since become act one of a three act short story (alright, it will probably be another novelette [Wink] ) that more fully does homage to Nick's story. 3000 word limit? Not in my vocabulary.

So, thank you, I'm slowly building a portfolio that may permit an anthology one day--before I consider starting the second novel. But as it seems this "unique" sub-subgenre is (as yet) unsaleable, I doubt I'd charge much--or anything--for these tales. I may follow my mother-in-law's example and donate the proceeds (if any) to charity, or perhaps I'll provide the stories for free and leave it up to the readers, if any, to consider making a donation to charity.

But I do plan to have fun creating a author's website when these are ready.

I appreciate your kind interest and support, LD.

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob

[ May 06, 2012, 01:06 PM: Message edited by: History ]

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LDWriter2
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Part of my interest is selfish. [Smile]

I believe the ones I have read--part of a novel and one novelette and a shorter one I believe-have shown good writing and are a good Tale. So I believe they should be out there.

None of my UF stories have sold either but probably for a different reason. I have between 13 and 20, some have been sent out only a couple of times.

I've thought about doing UF anthology-e-publishing and POD-but there's no time to clean up the nitpicks and commas in the stories. And I have thought opening up an anthology to the public but I don't know what type of contracts would be needed nor how to figure out how to pay the other writers.

I said that last because I would take yours if I did that. Again it would be more for selfish reason. I want to read more of your stories and I believe there are those out there who would read them--therefore would be the anthology. [Smile]

Not to mention you are a fellow hatracker who needs help.

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History
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Good minds, and good hearts, think alike. [Smile]

I am also halfway through a story, an exercise in world-building and straight science fantasy in the Jack Vance and Marion Zimmer Bradley tradition, that I am thinking might be good for a shared world anthology for fellow Hatrackers (and artists if I can get them). I'd keep the business end simple, but set the bar for as near professional stories as we can achieve. It would be good to support the Treehouse community. They have been a great help to me.

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob

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extrinsic
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Anthology publication may not require as extensive a contract as book publishing might but the principles are the same. CYA is the number one principle, Cover Your All (backside).

A link to a talking-point outline for a publishing contract. Though, as in all things legal, professional legal advice is advisable.

http://www.copylaw.com/new_articles/final.three.html

copylaw.com is a wonderful website for exploring the ins and outs of publishing's legal issues.

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Kathleen Dalton Woodbury
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History, I don't remember, so if you've said, I apologize, but have you tried ASIMOV'S?
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LDWriter2
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I would love to do a Treehouse Anthology even though there would be no guarantee that I would get in but again how to split any profits would be a problem.

Unless we give it all to a writer's charity.

And would every story have to at least start in the Treehouse?? And would those who have gone on to become pros-or almost pros- be invited?

But Kathleen, ASIMOV'S buys Urban Fantasy?

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History
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Extrinsic,
I responded to your "Anthology Anyone?" thread. Legal issues regarding rights and liability are always a concern. However, I don't believe they should or would be an insurmountable barrier--or we wouldn't have any publications. Review the available agreements and their indemnity provisions from the multiple similar venues on the web. Something similar should suffice.

Ms Woodbury,
Thank you for your suggestion. I've sent it with the following cover:

The good doctor retired from his position as Professor of Biochemistry at the Boston University School of Medicine the year I matriculated. I swear it was not my fault--I think.

I felt a bit out of place at BU as an English major (though they were interested in developing "renaissance" physicians at the time and not pure science geeks), but medicine proved a fascinating career. Now as I'm passing the reigns to younger partners I have returned to writing, with publications in small press last year (Flashquake vol 10 #3 and #4 http://www.flashquake.org/archives/2011-present/) and editing my mother-in-law's recently published Holocaust memoir (reviewed http://www.pressherald.com/life/life-story_2012-04-29.html and on Amazon).

The attached fiction, "The Kabbalist: A Madness Most Discreet"(12K), is Yiddishkeit (Jewish) urban fantasy, a genre I credit Dr. Asimov for originating with his Azazel stories of the 1980's-1990's. The gist: Rabbi Cane has moved to Boston to start over, but his past catches up with him. He confronts the walking dead, the bomb, and the devil. Welcome to Bean town, Rabbi.

This is a tale of love, madness, and sacrifice. Thank you for considering it.


LD,
I agree that any Treehouse anthology should be the best we can offer and should be open to any current or former Hatracker (though I believe it unlikely those who have gone on to success would wish to participate). As I shared in extrinsic's thread, I believe any proceeds from such an anthology should be used to create the next one.

Respectfully,
Dr, Bob

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LDWriter2
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Well, using amy profits to create another one wouldn't be bad either.

More on the other post.

But in either case with the Treehouse anthology, let's not forget that you could do one for Caine.

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Eliza C
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Good luck with Asimov's. I only read the last few posts, but if they don't take it, Writers of the Future accepts subs of up to 17k and Tor.com up to 12k (Tor has a low acceptance rate, though, and a very long response time, I hear).
If you can whittle it under 10k some semipro markets are Interzone, Electric Velocipede, Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine and Abyss and Apex that all take up to 10k. (I haven't checked this info for being current.)

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Kathleen Dalton Woodbury
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quote:
Originally posted by LDWriter2:
But Kathleen, ASIMOV'S buys Urban Fantasy?

I've seen them buy it, on occasion, and I think they might buy this one. It wouldn't hurt to try. And I think that's a great cover letter, too.
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LDWriter2
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quote:
It wouldn't hurt to try.
You have a point there.


Wonder if I could send them some of mine. Of course my cover letter wouldn't be nearly as interesting neither is my writing but I do have a couple that makes it sound more like there's a science reason behind the magic if that means anything.

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LDWriter2
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I haven't found that one that pays $100 for over 10,000 word stories maybe it's closed

But this one takes 10,000 words, You've seen it before.

http://buzzymag.com/submissions/

and there's this one
http://www.grantvillegazette.com/Universe_Annex_Submissions

They go up to 15,000 words which surprised me last time I heard they wanted to keep the story lengths down. However the submission process is a bit complicated. And the closest to 10,000 words the better.

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Thanks, LD.
Unfortunately buzzymag has a 10K limit. MADNESS is 12K. As for Grantville Gazette, am I mistaken in this is a shared world/theme venue for 1632 tales?

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob

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LDWriter2
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Grantville Gazette now shares it's venue with Universe Annex.

The Annex used to be Jim Baen's Universe Magazine but with his death the magazine collapsed even though the publishing arm still seems to doing okay. The editor etc, of Universe didn't want to see it end and they were able to work something out with the Grantville Gazette. Which might be why they changed the name to Universe Annex.

But if you try it remember to follow their instructions as I said it's complicated.

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LDWriter2
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Found it. 5,000 to 25,000 words $100 one story per month.

http://giganotosaurus.org/submission-guidelines/

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You are amazing, LD.
How you find these places, I never know. [Wink]

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob

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Being unfamiluar throws me off at times, but Dr. Bob is pretty top notch so I'd read it. If i happened across it without knowing who wrote it I don't know if I'd stick with it or not, guess it depends on how many references I wouldn't get compared to how much I can understand.

I think you would do well self publishing some of these if you can't find a market due to the length. People are holding steadfast to length requirements but in digital that stuff is chaning as far as READER preference.

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Thank you for the kind words, GN.
This particular tale bounced from WOTF, IGMS, and F&SF, venues I greatly respect.

I like the tale though, admittedly, I write to please myself. I have come to appreciate that to sell to markets, one needs to write for markets and (1) there is great competiton, and (2) I still have much more to learn to be a better writer--if I have the humility and patience. [Wink]

I've suspected for many months that these particular stories of my tragic Kabbalist hero may end up self-pubbed, and this may be best. I'm trying my hand at other story genres first before I complete the next three Kabbalist stories that should provide an 80-100K anthology by the time I retire in a couple years.

Of course, there is alway's extrinsic's proposed Treehouse anthology to which I may try my luck at some day. [Smile]

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob

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Osiris
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I think you have a good hook here with the postmortem fingerprints all over the lab. I would read on.

Tastes on description vary, but as extrinsic mentioned in this thread, description is best delivered in the context of other modes of writing. I call it 'incidental description', in which traits are delivered as part of action, and though they can be delivered through other modes, action, IMO, is best.

quote:
I paused while pouring her tea. Lt Col Helen Schwartz of the Defense Intelligence Agency was a stocky brunette, muscular not zaftig. Her nose was a bit large for her face and had a slight crook, but it gave her a distinct Romanesque beauty. She’d cut her hair short. I wasn’t sure I liked it. I handed her the cup, black with two sugars.
So here, this does give me pause (pun intended [Smile] ). As written, I imagine her tea cup runneth over, as her host pauses while pouring the tea to note so many of her features that by the time he is done noting them, tea will soak the carpet/hardwood floor/tiles! [Smile]

Consider instead describing these features more succinctly and through action. Does Helen inhale the scent of her tea before drinking? That'd be an opportunity to slip in the detail of her Romanesque nose. If she is muscular, perhaps the POV character fears for the delicate teacup he's given her, or notices how despite her frame, she handles it with the gentleness of a ballerina.

Lastly, I think you should keep the cultural words, though you can give the reader cues to know what the mean. I often will use body language that is familiar to all people in conjunction with dialog, like so:

quote:
"La." Moemen shook his head.
A reasonably experienced reader can probably figure what "La" means(Arabic for 'no') because Moemen shakes his head.

So for your story, you could do:
quote:
Nu?" Jack shrugged "It’s his lab.”
I might not consciously think Nu means 'so', but subconsciously I will understand.

Just touching on the market discussions, I haven't been reading short fiction that long, but having read some of IGMS, Asimovs, F&SF, Analog, Clarkesworld and a few others, one thing I noticed is there are few if any stories that hedge close to religious themes, though I'm not sure how much religion is in this one. Some of my best-received work deals with religious themes, and I have also had trouble finding someone to publish it. I honestly wonder if this is just territory editors shy away from. Like you, I think I might have to self-pub with these particular stories.

Reading this thread made me think how nice it would be to have an interfaith anthology of speculative fiction.

[ May 12, 2012, 07:49 AM: Message edited by: Osiris ]

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Thank you, Osiris.
If you create such an anthology, I would try to write something worthy to contribute.

Although my stories are spiced with theological sayings, mystical suppositions, myths, and folklore (Jewish and others--e.g. ancient Egyptian, Christian, and Norse to name a few), I don't consider the narratives "religious" (no "Pilgrim's Progess" or even "Narnia").

My characters do face conflicts with justice, mercy, love, doubt, sacrifice, etc.--but I believe these are, generally speaking, nondenominational themes.

I merely wrap them in a Joseph-like coat of many colors. [Wink]

Respectfully,
Dr. Bob

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extrinsic
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The standout for me is the first-person description of Schwartz. First person by default closes narrartive distance. A viewpoint character's voice estranges a narrator's voice, or implied author's voice in the case of first-person narrators. That voice situates readers in immediate persons, settings, and events of a dramatic action.

This has been sticking in my mind for some time: The excerpt opens with dialogue lines. I have no sense of who's who, who's speaking, nor of the grammatical person. The dialogue feels third person. From the dialogue hanging out in white space, I feel like at first I'm listening to disembodied minds speaking. Opening with dialogue is challenging. Pauses in the early goings of a dramatic action are challenging, too.

Then the description of Schwartz follows. The "I paused" subject and predicate clause does establish who's who. However, I feel the then following description of Schwartz implies on its own that Jack paused to gather his thoughts. Frankly, too, I feel that paragraph introduces Jack and would have stronger impact if it preceded the dialogue.

That paragraph would be stronger yet if it gave a stronger sense of the physical space Jack and Schwartz are in. The Schwartz description orients readers to a person and somewhat introduces Jack. I don't see orientation to setting. I do see an event unfolding, strong hints there's a mystery.

The fresh fingerprints suggest a partial dramatic complication, one of a mystery why they're fresh--how does Schwartz know they're fresher than a week old?--with Charles dead the week before, sufficient enticement for a brief opening of a long work. For a twelve-thousand-word narrative, I'd expect introductions to consume up to a thousand words of real estate.

Narratives I've read with religious motifs, the ones that stood out for me have the reilgious premises intertwined with their plots. I don't see that yet in the excerpt. I'd be looking for it if I read on.

Supernatural phenomena when exotic for readers makes religious content less propoganda and less preaching, and more visionary and mystic, and thus more palatable for outsiders who resist being preached at. Actually, that is the basis for Tolkien's secondary settings theory. Secondary settings engage readers in a "second space" different from their ordinary alpha reality. "First space" being Coleridge's willing suspension of disbelief theory, which religiously motifed narratives tend to compromise when otherwise not preaching to the choir.

Good start, though I think the organization and content could be strengthened for reader ease of accessibility to intent and meaning.

[ May 12, 2012, 01:32 PM: Message edited by: extrinsic ]

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Kathleen Dalton Woodbury
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quote:
Originally posted by Osiris:
Reading this thread made me think how nice it would be to have an interfaith anthology of speculative fiction.

Ooh! I like that idea! Maybe there can be a Tales from the Treehouse interfaith anthology. Eric James Stone has an award-winner that would fit, for certain.
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quote:
Originally posted by Kathleen Dalton Woodbury:
quote:
Originally posted by Osiris:
Reading this thread made me think how nice it would be to have an interfaith anthology of speculative fiction.

Ooh! I like that idea! Maybe there can be a Tales from the Treehouse interfaith anthology. Eric James Stone has an award-winner that would fit, for certain.
Maybe it is something we could work on after extrinsic's anthology. I've had this vision for some time of spec-fic not just as entertainment or as a means of provoking thought, but as vehicle for bridge-building between cultures. If spec-fic is the literature of dreamers, do we not all dream? [Smile]
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extrinsic
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quote:
Originally posted by Osiris:
Maybe it is something we could work on after extrinsic's anthology. I've had this vision for some time of spec-fic not just as entertainment or as a means of provoking thought, but as vehicle for bridge-building between cultures. If spec-fic is the literature of dreamers, do we not all dream? [Smile]

Ahh, the literature of multiculturalism. Situational multiculturalism under study respects and celebrates cultural diversity. Extended multiculturalism as a literary movement explores self-realized coping with the complications of cultural diversity.
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