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» Hatrack River Writers Workshop » Forums » Open Discussions About Writing » Vocab - Word of the day. (Page 3)

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Author Topic: Vocab - Word of the day.
Smiley
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bom·bas·tic (bom-bas-tik)

– adjective (of speech, writing, etc.)
pompous; pretentious; high-sounding; high-flown; inflated.


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Robert Nowall
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geometry

From the Greek geometria, geo, the Earth, and metron, measure---in Greek, the equivalent of land surveying.

The branch of mathematics dealing with points, lines, angles, surfaces, and solids, and the relationships between them. Also more specific branches, such as analytic geometry.

Used: "The method actor practicing his craft once said 'Gee, I'm a tree!'"


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Smiley
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embroil [em-broil]

–verb (used with object)
1. to bring into discord or conflict; involve in contention or strife.
2. to throw into confusion; complicate.

The recipe directions called for embroiled beef strips.


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walexander
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Five words to help your hack and slash necessities.

1-20-2011
Sever

1. to separate (a part) from the whole, as by cutting or the like.
2. to divide into parts, esp. forcibly; cleave.

1-21-2011
Lacerate

1: to tear roughly; mangle: The barbed wire lacerated his hands.

1-22-2011
Incise

1. to cut into; cut marks, figures, etc., upon.
2. to make (marks, figures, etc.) by cutting; engrave; carve.

1-23-2011
Cleave

1: to split or divide by or as if by a cutting blow, esp. along a natural line of division, as the grain of wood.

1-24-2011
Slit

1.to cut apart or open along a line; make a long cut, fissure, or opening in.
2.to cut or rend into strips; split.
3. a straight, narrow cut, opening, or aperture.


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Robert Nowall
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Sirius

From the ancient Greek Seirios, "glowing," or maybe "scorcher."

Alpha Canis Majoris, the brightest star visible from Earth, a binary system. Also known as "the Dog Star," because of its location in Canis Major ("Big Dog.")

Used in a sentence: "Don't worry, Ma, 'twas nothing Sirius."


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walexander
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1-25-2011

Plait

1: pleat
2: a braid of material (as hair or straw); specifically : pigtail

1. She wore her hair in plaits.
2. she wore a plait down her back that reached her waist

Origin of PLAIT
Middle English pleit, from Anglo-French pleit, plei, pli, from Vulgar Latin *plicitum, from neuter of Latin plicitus, past participle of plicare to fold — more at ply
First Known Use: 14th century

1-26-2011

Pleat

1: fold; especially : to arrange in pleats <pleat a skirt>
2: plait

Origin of PLEAT
Middle English pleten, from pleit, plete plait
First Known Use: 14th century

1-27-2011

Glabrous

1: having a surface devoid of hair or pubescence.

Origin:
1630–40; < L glabr- (s. of glaber ) smooth, hairless + -ous

1-28-2011

Comose

1: hairy; comate.


Origin:
1785–95; < L comōsus, equiv. to com ( a ) (< Gk kómē hair, foliage of trees or plants) + -ōsus -ose1

11-29-2011

Comate

1: a mate or companion.

Origin:
1570–80; co- + mate1

1-30-2011

Hirsute

1. hairy; shaggy.
2. Botany, Zoology . covered with long, rather stiff hairs.
3. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of hair.

Origin:
1615–25; < L hirsūtus rough, shaggy, bristly; akin to horrid

1-31-2011

Grizzled

1. having gray or partly gray hair.
2. gray or partly gray.

Origin:
1350–1400; ME.

2-1-2011

Ropy

1. resembling a rope or ropes: ropy muscles.
2. forming viscid or glutinous threads, as a liquid.

Origin:
1470–80; rope + -y1


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