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» Hatrack River Forum » Active Forums » Discussions About Orson Scott Card » Lost Boys: Since I already know the twist,

   
Author Topic: Lost Boys: Since I already know the twist,
Scooter
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am I going to enjoy reading the book (c'mon all you psychics--tell me!)? I've unfortunately read too many unintentional spoilers on this site about the book so I at least know the gist of the twist. I also know that I enjoy reading OSC enough that I'm sure there will be some worthwhile aspects to reading it...but I also wonder if it will be hard to enjoy the book if I know what I'm not supposed to know. That and several here have said how painful of a read it is (emotionally). Thus, I have been dragging my feet. What do you all suggest?
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Uprooted
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I say go ahead and read it. I was sucked into the story in the first few pages, and I suspect I would have found it just as good a read had I known of the "twist" ahead of time. I suspected it anyway, before it was actually revealed, although I hadn't figured it all out. But yeah, it's definitely a gut-wrencher, so don't read it if you're looking for a pick-me-up.
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Papa Moose
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I had read the short story before reading the novel, so I knew the "twist." Nonetheless, it's a fantastic novel, and I think it's accurate to say I've cried every time I've read it.
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Speed
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Whenever I think back on that novel, the ending is the part that made the smallest impression on me. It's a well crafted and well written ending that fits with the rest of the novel, but there's so much going on all through that book that by the time you reach the end you may well find that you've forgot that there was even a twist coming.

OSC isn't M. Night Anybody. His books may have twists, but they don't rely on them, and they don't leave you waiting for them. I've read that book many times, always knowing the twist, and it has never diminished the experience in the slightest for me.

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Audeo
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I read the novel after I'd read the short story, so I knew the twist, and I'd agree with Papa Moose; the story isn't diminished by knowing the truth. In some ways, because you know what's happened, certain scenes are even more emotional than they would be if you didn't know what was going on.
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Jqueasy
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I didn't know the twist, but I knew something was coming, and it just drove me more into the story. You may know whats going to happen, but you dont know about the family its going to happen to. Outside of ender/bean, Lost boys is my favorite novel.
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Scott R
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Read the book. The twist isn't the important part of the story.
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Kit the Odd
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I read the short story first, but I had forgotten the twist before reading the book. I guess the short story just didn't stick with me for some reason, I don't know.

I read the book. I was an awesome, emotional experience. I haven't re-read it since, although I've thought about it. I'm just not ready to bring those emotions up again.

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Scooter
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Thanks everybody. As I think about it, the first thing I read by OSC was the fairly recent book with 3 or 4 Ender-related stories (one about his dad, one about Jane, the Ender's Game original short story)--the first two stories gave away things about Ender's Game and Speaker, but I read those next and, well, I'm on this site aren't I?!

I guess I'll have to get a copy of it.

[ November 08, 2005, 02:54 PM: Message edited by: Scooter ]

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Orson Scott Card
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I hope I never write a book that is so dependent on a twist or surprise that the book isn't worth re-reading.
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dawnmaria
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Well I've re-read it several times and I think it's a great read every time I do. I weep at the end like I've lost a family member. That's because the book is so well written that I feel like a part of that family. I've often caught myself wondering how they're all doing now! [Smile]
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ketchupqueen
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I agree, I re-read whenever I need some emotional release. It's a wonderful book, and the way it's written, you don't see it coming even though you know what's going to happen. It's my favorite.
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0range7Penguin
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I read the short story first and still enjoyed the book.

But I am also part of the minority that like the short story better...

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odouls268
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quote:
OSC isn't M. Night Anybody
M. Night Shama(insert proper sp? here) is SO good at building suspense and winding you up, that his twists are ALWAYS complete letdowns.
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LadyDove
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I appreciated Lost Boys on multiple levels. I read it at the suggestion of Mrs. Card, who offered it as an example of how to handle a less than wonderful teacher.

I loved the relationship between Step and his wife and felt like it was a sort of manual on how two fiercely strong-willed people could make a marriage thrive.

I also liked the interplay of Step's family with the church community.

After reading the book, I went back and read the short story. The essay at the end of the story made my heart ache.

For me, Lost Boys is just a gorgeous piece of work and each time I read it, I find my eye drawn to a different point, depending on where I'm at in my own life.

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Oobie Binoobie
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I can't reread _Lost Boys_, at least not now. Wait until my kids are all safely grown, then I can look back with it on a might-have-been. Right now it would just be too possible, however improbable.
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Dagonee
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I found my copy of Lost Boys when I was down at my parents' house for the New Year and just finished rereading it.

The effect was just as big the second time around - maybe more so. It might be OSC's best book overall. Certainly, it's the one that affects me the most.

So thank you, OSC, for such a wonderful work.

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Duncan Idaho
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I reread this book every time I go down to my parent's house (they own the copy); I can read it in less than 48 hours and I have read it so many times it is NOT funny.

I don't know what I find most fascinating about it; the idea of such a tight knit family, the early 80's computer aspect of it (the 80's rule and I miss the computers from that era), or just the pure good writing. From the outside it doesn't seem like a very interesting story, but something about it just grabs me every time.

A great work.

-Duncan

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King of Men
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I, too, knew the twist beforehand and still enjoyed the book.
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Dagonee
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quote:
the early 80's computer aspect of it (the 80's rule and I miss the computers from that era)
All the Commodore bashing was fun to this old Atari guy. [Smile] And the analysis of the IBM was spot on.
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sarcare
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It is cool that people pick up such different aspects as enjoyable about that book.

I recommended it to my parents because it reminded me so much of them. In the same time period the book depicts, my father quit his job right before one of his children was born, they moved when we were young,and many of the cultural references were similar. Like I remember listening to the saftey kids, and the same instructions on what to do if some one tries to kidnap you.

But my parents liked the book because of the whole story line about the children and the dangers they faced. Though my dad also mentioned enjoying the computer stuff.

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JennaDean
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Okay, so how many of us are going to admit that our "safety word" with our kids is now "Maggots"?
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macnewbold
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Just finished reading Lost Boys for the first time (without knowing the twist in advance, and without knowing in advance that it was sad/gut-wrenching) and I just had to find someplace to say how marvelous it is. OSC, the depth and breadth of your talents will never cease to amaze me.

I also made the mistake of finishing it late at night, just before falling asleep. My wife fell asleep first, so I didn't even have anyone to talk to about it. It took me a while to get to sleep, and I was worried what my subconscious might do to me while I slept. But luckily there was nothing I remembered when I woke up.

I loved the book, though it would be hard for me to reread again unless I want to subject myself to another gut-wrenching. I won't even try to enumerate all the parts I liked, but there are a few things I'd like to mention.

I especially liked the development of the family and the family relationships... I feel like I know them. The relationships with the members of the ward also were very good, and I enjoyed reading them. It was easy to relate the various characteristics and situations to people I have known.

The 80's computer nostalgia was also a lot of fun. I don't remember exactly, but I seem to remember that OSC once worked for Byte if I'm not mistaken. The play on that with Eight Bits Inc. was a lot of fun to me, and if OSC is listening, I'd be interested in hearing how much (if any) things in the book are based on things from his own life. I'd have to be dense to not guess that Zap is probably based in some degree on Charlie Ben. I don't want to pry, but I'm curious when Lost Boys was written in relation to the unfolding of the situation with Charlie Ben.

Again, Mr. Card, thank you so much for sharing your marvelous talents with all of us. I've read almost all your books, and the list is growing constantly shorter, despite your rate of new publications. I'm extremely grateful for your thought-provoking writing and the effect that it has on my life.

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macnewbold
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BTW, I found many of the answers I was looking for elsewhere here by searching for Lost Boys, including this one:

http://www.hatrack.com/cgi-bin/ubbmain/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=003013;p=0&r=nfx

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Omega M.
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quote:
Originally posted by Duncan Idaho:

the early 80's computer aspect of it

So how do you all picture Hacker Snack? I keep thinking of it as something like The Adventures of Lolo (or, as it's known in Japan, Eggerland). The first game in this series came out in 1985, so it's not much of a stretch.
quote:
Originally posted by JennaDean:

Okay, so how many of us are going to admit that our "safety word" with our kids is now "Maggots"?

All I could think of when I read that was that "Maggots. Heh-heh." line they kept showing in the Corpse Bride ads. (Obviously not intentional.)
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