FacebookTwitter
Hatrack River Forum Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Hatrack River Forum » Active Forums » Books, Films, Food and Culture » Formerly: "When do Hibisci bloom (mayfly)?" Now playwriting 101

   
Author Topic: Formerly: "When do Hibisci bloom (mayfly)?" Now playwriting 101
Pelegius
Member
Member # 7868

 - posted      Profile for Pelegius           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Is it during the winter?

[ September 21, 2006, 08:16 PM: Message edited by: Pelegius ]

Posts: 1332 | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Farmgirl
Member
Member # 5567

 - posted      Profile for Farmgirl   Email Farmgirl         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Usually late summer (August or so) until first frost. Are they outdoors or are you growing it indoors?

(I've seen some newer, smaller varieties that can be grown indoors)

Posts: 9538 | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pelegius
Member
Member # 7868

 - posted      Profile for Pelegius           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I am not growing them at all. I am writing a play for my highschool, and wanted to make sure that the reference to hibisci blooming in december was feasable. I seem to recall that they do in South Texas; in warm zones, such as South Texas or Hawaii, is this possible?
Posts: 1332 | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
jennabean
Member
Member # 8590

 - posted      Profile for jennabean   Email jennabean         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Yup.
Posts: 308 | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
maui babe
Member
Member # 1894

 - posted      Profile for maui babe   Email maui babe         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
They're always in bloom here.
Posts: 2069 | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Uprooted
Member
Member # 8353

 - posted      Profile for Uprooted   Email Uprooted         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I know it sounds awful, but all the online dictionaries that I just checked that give a plural form list it as "hibiscuses."

However, I've never heard that. In normal usage the consensus seems to be (via my own experience and a quick Google) that hibiscus is used as the plural--so for your play I would say "the hibiscus are blooming" or something along those lines.

And I'm no expert, but December blooming in tropical climates sounds normal to me.

Posts: 3149 | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
dkw
Member
Member # 3264

 - posted      Profile for dkw   Email dkw         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I've grown hibiscus, but only in the midwest.
Here they do not bloom in December. [Monkeys]

Posts: 9866 | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ketchupqueen
Member
Member # 6877

 - posted      Profile for ketchupqueen   Email ketchupqueen         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My mom (in SoCal) has two hibiscus; they bloom from about late June until about late January. Then when they stop blooming she cuts them back for the year so they don't take over her window and driveway. My dad used to have some hibiscus before he moved (he lives here in SoCal, too); they were apparently a shorter-and earlier-blooming variety, and bloomed from about mid-May until mid-October. My dad's were white, my mom's are pink, if that helps.
Posts: 21181 | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ketchupqueen
Member
Member # 6877

 - posted      Profile for ketchupqueen   Email ketchupqueen         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
(Oh, yes, and we've always said "hibiscus" as the plural of "hibiscus.")
Posts: 21181 | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ketchupqueen
Member
Member # 6877

 - posted      Profile for ketchupqueen   Email ketchupqueen         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Also, from things my mom has said, apparently the reason hibiscus do so well here is our very alkaline soil. They like it. They also like the constant warm temperatures and the variety she has is surprisingly drought-resistant for a tropical plant, although they do need more water than, say, her succulents (but don't most plants.)
Posts: 21181 | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Ela
Member
Member # 1365

 - posted      Profile for Ela           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
According to the University of Florida website, hibiscus bloom basically all year in southern Florida.
Posts: 5770 | Registered: Nov 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pelegius
Member
Member # 7868

 - posted      Profile for Pelegius           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Anyway, here is the bit I needed the info for:

quote:
Narrator: December the Sixth, 1941. The breezes of the Hawai’ian winter floated across the white beaches and the harbor. The Spanish bull had been slaughtered, but the Falangist matador had been pushed from the limelight as Europe became Gurneica. Here, the hibiscuses bloomed; in Poland Messrs Topf & Sons had already instaled, with great efficiany, their ovens at Auschwitz. Here, women baked cookies, grateful that the long-awaited end of the terrible depresion seemed near. The soldiers had not yet entered the village of Oradour-Sur-Glane, rounding the women and children into the Church, burning the temple of God down upon the people, but this too, in time, would come. Here, we shot pool in our messes and social clubs, in London, the poet had already noted that “After the first death, there is no other.”

Posts: 1332 | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Irami Osei-Frimpong
Member
Member # 2229

 - posted      Profile for Irami Osei-Frimpong   Email Irami Osei-Frimpong         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
"efficiany" Is that a word? Did the Allies even know about Auschwitz in '41?

Anyway, to my ear, this is all too hard. Every sentence seems to be about something else, and maybe, in totality, the whole narative measures up to something beautiful, but I don't see it, and from a narrative, I want to know what's going on in simple sentences, not bad poety concerning WWII. The forced allusions turn me off and make me wonder if you have any story to tell or characters of interest.

You can say that I'll somehow care about the story after the next bit, but I'm bored right now, and I'm worried that if the whole story were told in this sideways style, I'd fall asleep no matter how good the plot.

[ September 18, 2006, 07:52 PM: Message edited by: Irami Osei-Frimpong ]

Posts: 5600 | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
rivka
Member
Member # 4859

 - posted      Profile for rivka   Email rivka         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Irami Osei-Frimpong:
Did the Allies even know about Auschwitz in '41?

Officially, or in actual fact? (No, and yes.)
Posts: 32919 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pelegius
Member
Member # 7868

 - posted      Profile for Pelegius           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
"Did the Allies even know about Auschwitz in '41?"

Quite possibly, but that is not the point. The narrator, like so many in his position has the gift of hindsight.

"The forced allusions turn me off and make me wonder if you have any story to tell or characters of interest."

The two allusions are both highly topical, but you are free to dislike them. The characters, however, are not mine but real people borrowed from history. They too, you are free to dislike, but it would not be my fault, as I intended to use only their words to record the story, as an experiment in the playwright as editor.

"I want to know what's going on in simple sentences"

The Japanese will attack us! No! A very bad thing has happened. We are at war. [sobs]


"not bad poety concerning WWII."

The only line of poetry in there is from Dylan Thomas, who was not a bad poet, and does not specifically concern W.W.II

Posts: 1332 | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pelegius
Member
Member # 7868

 - posted      Profile for Pelegius           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Ah, sorry, Hatrack is adding posts in a stange and random manner, either that or just delaying everything for some time!
Posts: 1332 | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pelegius
Member
Member # 7868

 - posted      Profile for Pelegius           Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I would like to correct some a false. assumption: these lines do not begin a play, but only a scene within a play.
Posts: 1332 | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Teshi
Member
Member # 5024

 - posted      Profile for Teshi   Email Teshi         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Question: Does the scene following take place in 1941? If so, you might want to put the whole introduction into the present tense or the "have" rather than "had" tense, whatever that is:

quote:
The Spanish bull have been slaughtered
As it is, it reads like a present day narrator. If that's your intention, well, good. But be aware that that's what it sounds like.

It's okay to list historical things like that, to set the scene; however, I'd be wary of doing too much historical listing in a narrative form. People come to see a play, not a speech.

Posts: 8473 | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.
UBB Code™ Images not permitted.
Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Hatrack River Home Page

Copyright © 2008 Hatrack River Enterprises Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.


Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2