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Author Topic: 12 year old dies from toothache
SoaPiNuReYe
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He could have been saved...
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The Pixiest
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That's not a news story, that's a propaganda peice.
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Tinros
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How, so, Pixiest?
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ketchupqueen
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I don't care what it is, it's sad. [Frown]

Although technically he didn't die of a toothache, he died from complications of an infected tooth.

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The Pixiest
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Tin: It's not so much about the poor boy and his infection as it is about how we need to do something (national healthcare) about healthcare for the poor.

There's even a poll in the middle asking if the goverment should force more dentists to accept medicaid.

As someone without kids, I'm hesitant to sit in judgement over someone who does, but I'm inclined to chalk this up to "Bad Mother" Both of her kids teeth are rotting out, one to the point of death, I don't think I'm going too far out on a limb.

Teach your kids to brush their teeth and make sure they do it!

I think this child would have died no matter how much money we threw at his mom.

On a surly and insensitive note, judging from the picture at the top of the page, they should have The Rock play her in the made for TV movie.

Pix

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ketchupqueen
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Pixiest, tooth decay can be genetic. I know a boy from a fairly rich family (they live in Malibu) whose parents restrict his sugar, ensure he brushes well and frequently, take him to the dentist two to four times a year, etc., etc.-- and his teeth are still rotting out of his head. When I hear that the brother has six bad teeth, I begin to suspect the same thing is going on. I routinely go years between dental appointments, and the only time I had a cavity was after braces, on the back teeth that were banded (and so couldn't be cleaned effectively for three years.) And it was only two very small ones. Both my grandmothers still have all their teeth. Genetics is a huge part of tooth health, I've been told.
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sweetbaboo
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The fact remains that even for someone who is well employed with "insurance", often times dental isn't a part of that package. I know it isn't for my husband's employment, even just a regular check up and cleaning for everyone in a family adds up pretty quickly. So I don't think it is solely about the "poor".
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The Pixiest
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Dental insurance is horrid in any event. For the expensive things, most insurance only covers half.. and that's after the deductible.

Still, the procedure that would have saved this boy only cost $80. But she was not paying attention to him at *all*, she was focused on her other child with abscessed teeth.

And if you step back once more, the boy could have been saved with a toothbrush if his mother had just made him use it.

Sorry, KQ, missed your post until after I posted. Yes, the child might have just had genetically bad teeth. That does happen. But given the slant of the story I'm not willing to give it the benefit of the doubt. I think they would have mentioned that it's "Not the mothers fault" if they could have.

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camus
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quote:
tooth decay is still the single most common childhood disease nationwide, five times as common as asthma, experts say. Poor children are more than twice as likely to have cavities as their more affluent peers, research shows, but far less likely to get treatment.
So maybe this is just poor parenting...by a lot of parents. Whatever the case, it seems to be a fairly important issue. In this particular case, the mother was at least concerned enough to take her kids to the dentist, so it may be a bit hasty to declare a "bad mother" judgment. Perhaps better education is needed to make parents and children more informed about the importance of brushing one's teeth. If this article, propaganda or not, manages to at least inform a few people of that, then I have no problem with the article.
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sweetbaboo
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quote:
But she was not paying attention to him at *all*, she was focused on her other child with abscessed teeth.
I would tend to try to help the kid with the seemingly "worse" problem first as well, just sayin.

I do agree about the toothbrush part.

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ketchupqueen
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quote:
I think they would have mentioned that it's "Not the mothers fault" if they could have.
Since it's incredibly hard to prove when good dental care is NOT available, I'm not so sure.

quote:
I would tend to try to help the kid with the seemingly "worse" problem first as well, just sayin.

I think that is most parents' tendencies, especially if one kid is a complainer and the other isn't. I never notice my eldest is sick until she throws up or I feel her and she has a temperature of 102, because she just goes about her business as usual, the only indication is maybe she's not very hungry and a little sleepier than usual. She NEVER complains that something hurts or she doesn't feel well; she seems happy even when she is very sick. So I would be hard pressed to know to take care of her first, especially if her little sister the complainer was screaming about how miserable she felt.
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Samprimary
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quote:
Tin: It's not so much about the poor boy and his infection as it is about how we need to do something (national healthcare) about healthcare for the poor.
It's kind of the conclusion which is easy to jump to when a kiddo dies of a routinely treatable issue that was neglected and left to fester into an expensive and ultimately fatal condition that was untreated due to income difficulties on the part of a mother making her have to work through an increasingly broken system that was incapable of providing timely care.
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Kasie H
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I am waiting until I go to school in England to go to the dentist to fill my cavities. Even as a foreign national, b/c I am a student in the country more than six months, I will pay less than $200...even if I need a root canal! The same treatment would cost probably $1,000 here, and would generate significant out-of-pocket expense for me. I'm a genetic-bad-tooth victim, and even though I grew up continually covered by health insurance (and currently have good benefits from my job), my dental work has been out of this world expensive. And my current dental plan has a lifetime cap I have no doubt I would exceed within the next 7-10 years.
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pH
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[Eek!] Kasie, what kind of dentist are you going to? Unless you have a cavity in every other tooth..or aren't getting the usual tooth-colored fillings (for which I definitely can't fault you).

A lot of dental stuff is definitely genetic. I brushed my teeth once a day as a kid and never flossed, and the only cavities I have are in back molars which didn't fuse together properly, so pretty much they just need inlays so that they'll be a whole tooth. I never got sealants. I definitely needed braces, though.

Weird story: My boyfriend said he once dated a girl who had a lot of cavities...and the next time he went to the dentist, he had more cavities than he'd ever had in his life.

-pH

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Christine
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I don't see a problem with this news story or the conclusion it has reached. I am still not sure how I feel about universal health care, but I cannot fault the article for going there in this case.

Dental health is sorely underestimated and from what I understand, many people are uneducated about the importance of it as well as how to care for their teeth. I asked my dentist, when I had my son, when I should take him to the dentist for the first time. Her answer surprised me. She said that there is an initiative to try to get poor people to bring their kids into the dentist in preschool (3 years old), but that this is mostly to teach them how to care for their children's teeth. If we brushed our son's teeth twice a day then we could pretty much push it off until kindergarten (when his permanent teeth might start coming in).

I can't remember ever not knowing how to care for my teeth, but apparently it is a problem. I don't call that neglect, just lack of education. It all helps reach the same conclusion, though.

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pH
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And a need for yummier toothpaste. I brushed a whole lot more as a kid when I had Slimer toothpaste. Delicious! [Razz]

-pH

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Jon Boy
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quote:
Originally posted by The Pixiest:
But she was not paying attention to him at *all*, she was focused on her other child with abscessed teeth.

Oh, right, it's all the mother's fault—her fault for working three jobs, for living in a homeless shelter, and for worrying more about a child with six abscessed teeth. Shame on her, right?
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DevilDreamt
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"Oh, right, it's all the mother's fault—her fault for working three jobs, for living in a homeless shelter, and for worrying more about a child with six abscessed teeth. Shame on her, right?"

Wait... isn't it her fault that she's poor? Isn't everyone in America born with equal rights and opportunities? Obviously she did something wrong if she's poor. She probably doesn't work hard enough or worship Jesus with all her heart or something.

On a less sarcastic note, if she is living in a homeless shelter and working three jobs, what exactly is she spending her money on? Surely three jobs would net some cash, especially if you are in a homeless shelter...

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Christine
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Where did you get that she was living in a homeless shelter?
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Jon Boy
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quote:
DaShawn saw a dentist a couple of years ago, but the dentist discontinued the treatments, she said, after the boy squirmed too much in the chair. Then the family went through a crisis and spent some time in an Adelphi homeless shelter. From there, three of Driver's sons went to stay with their grandparents in a two-bedroom mobile home in Clinton.
First paragraph on the second page of the article. They weren't living in a homeless shelter at the time, but it sounds like they recently had been; the Medicaid paperwork presumably got lost because it was sent to the shelter where they'd been living.
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ketchupqueen
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quote:
the dentist discontinued the treatments, she said, after the boy squirmed too much in the chair.
This bothers me every time I read it.

Also, I'm not sure she was working three jobs at a time; it sounded to me like she had moved from job to job trying to find something to pay the bills. (Been there, done that.)

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Shan
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Yowsah.

First, it's not inconceivable to work three minimum wage jobs and still be unable to afford the first, last, and deposit on a renatl unit -- never mind the exorbitant cost of decent rentals.

Second, at least in my area, most dentists are simply unwilling to accept patients on medicaid because the amount they receive for treatment as compared to insured clients is abysmal, and the paperwork and administrative overhead is awful and adds a lot to the cost of treating patients on medicaid.

Third, there are both genetic and dietary causes related to tooth decay at all levels of society. And not a lot of education about basic dental hygiene.

Fourth, this country (USA) ranks shamefully in most indicators of child health and well-being, anyhow.

Fifth, we need to think of ways to support families. Not condemn.

And now I need to take my son off to his swimming class. I'll be back.

*smiles*

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SoaPiNuReYe
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I really feel sorry for the mother in the story, I mean she did what she could and still her kid died. I probably would have done the same thing in her situation, when it came to sending one kid to the dentist, because at the time I'm sure that the mother thought it was the right thing to do. The kid had 6 rotting teeth...
I don't like how insurance is run around here, especially when Canada's is run so much better. I mean you really don't hear about these types of things happening over there.

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Annie
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I like the slant of the article. Powerfully written.

But also, I am a newly converted dental floss advocate. I composed this a couple weeks ago:

Just floss your teeth. It's really not that hard. It's not a liberal movement to take away your personal freedoms; it's not a conservative attempt to force someone else's morals on you. It's not even a corporate ploy to subject you to semi-annual 73-cent purchases. It's just a way to get food out from between your teeth, saving you pain and money at the inevitable dentist. I promise - it's entirely worth the 3 minutes of your life you'll have to give away every day. Just do it. Human civilization has evolved for 6,000 years to produce chap and profuse dental floss in some fortunate western nations. Live it up.

(written after a frustrating day trying to find dental floss in Japan that was less than 5 dollars)

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Belle
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I really take issue with several things.

1. He did not die from a toothache. He died from an infection that spread to his brain - an infection that began with an abscessed tooth (and incidentally, hasn't there been evidence found that one of the pharoahs died from a tooth abscess?) The very title of the article is dishonest - nobody dies from an ache - the pain is a symptom of a very real problem but the editors wanted scare tactics and shock value over accuracy. "Boy dies from bacterial infection in brain" just doesn't have the same effect, even though it's true.

2. Yes, tooth decay can be hereditary but good oral hygiene goes a LONG way toward preventing major problems. My teeth are terrible, lots of cavities in my youth and young adulthood but since I got older and wiser and began to have to pay for my own dental care I really, really focused on caring for them properly and surprise - no real problems over the last decade or so except for when old fillings break down and need replacing. Until recently, and from what I've been told that's not unusual for post-chemo patients, the chemo wreaks havoc with your mouth plus with all the ease with which your gums bleed when your blood counts are low you don't brush as hard.

3. I have four kids, and I know how hard it is to make certain that all of them have properly brushed their teeth unless you just stand over them each night. I do the best I can and I'm certain that if I were living in a homeless shelter it would be even tougher. But I make it a priority because I know it's vital to their health. Could this mother have done more? Probably. I also can't understand allowing my kid's medical coverage to lapse and either be unaware or not get it corrected immediately. There's no doubt she shares some responsibility in this from my point of view.

4. Lots of things are broken with our Medicaid system. No doubt. But I don't like the idea of forcing a dentist to take Medicaid unless Medicaid will reimburse him properly. (I know the article didn't state that should happen, but the poll question certainly implies the idea) The reason dentists don't take Medicaid isn't because they hate poor kids. It's because they make no money off them - the costs of dealing with the Medicaid paperwork are more than the reimbursed amount. Fix that, and you'll have plenty of dentists more than happy to take Medicaid patients. Heck it'll even pay for itself - if Medicaid reimbursed easily and with no hassle for $80 extractions they might avoid $200,000 hospital bills.

5. I'm finding it hard to believe the statement that a dentist quit seeing a child because he squirmed in a chair. It's not out of the realm of possibility, but I don't think there are dentists alive who treat children (and even some adults) who don't have to deal with squirmers. And good lord, if my child is disruptive and not sitting still for the dentist, then I, as a parent, will step in and correct the situation. I just...find that hard to believe.

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Boris
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Yes, it's sad this kid died from something that was easily treatable. I also think it's sad that a "journalist" used his particular experience to expose problems in a system that simply cannot handle its own size.

I want to know a couple things. Where's the boy's father? Where's the support of family and friends? Should we really be looking to the government to solve all of our problems? I don't think it's fair for us to expect that. Rather than blaming the system for everything bad that happens, perhaps we should be looking at the cause, a society that is almost completely wrapped up in the ideals of self-fulfillment and entitlement. It sure is easy to blame the government for this. But I seriously don't think the failings of government are the chief problem here.

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Launchywiggin
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All I know is that I, for one, won't be having kids unless I know I can provide for them. If, when I do happen to have a kid while I'm still as poor as I am now, you better believe I won't be having any more until I know I can provide for them.

Sometimes, mothers have no control over circumstances like when the father leaves. That's why we have a system that allows for welfare and medicaid. This happened to my aunt living in Philadelphia with 3 toddlers. Their dad left and didn't send checks till they were teens. Anyway, she was completely broke and had to go on welfare and medicaid, and she worked hard to provide for the kids. They cancelled her welfare and medicaid after she started making more money, and as is often the case, that meant that a lot of amenities went out the door, including health care. If my dad (a doctor) hadn't helped out, I imagine she would have been in the same boat as this lady.

Part of me complains at seeing mothers come into the grocery store buying their necessities (milk, bread, cheese) with WIC money followed by 40$ of beer, cigarettes, and ice cream. Part of me understands why we need a system that protects people without health care.

heck, I'm one of em (no health insurance). Luckily, I brush my teeth/floss every day and eat according to the food pyramid. I just hope following those rules keeps me out of the hospital.

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Christine
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quote:
Originally posted by Belle:
1. He did not die from a toothache. He died from an infection that spread to his brain - an infection that began with an abscessed tooth (and incidentally, hasn't there been evidence found that one of the pharoahs died from a tooth abscess?) The very title of the article is dishonest - nobody dies from an ache - the pain is a symptom of a very real problem but the editors wanted scare tactics and shock value over accuracy. "Boy dies from bacterial infection in brain" just doesn't have the same effect, even though it's true.

He did die because his toothache was not treated, so no, it is not dishonest at all. There were intervening steps and the article did go into exactly how a toothache could get to the point that it killed a boy, but since fixing that tooth would have prevented all this, I cannot see the title as dishonest at all.

quote:

3. I have four kids, and I know how hard it is to make certain that all of them have properly brushed their teeth unless you just stand over them each night. I do the best I can and I'm certain that if I were living in a homeless shelter it would be even tougher. But I make it a priority because I know it's vital to their health. Could this mother have done more? Probably. I also can't understand allowing my kid's medical coverage to lapse and either be unaware or not get it corrected immediately. There's no doubt she shares some responsibility in this from my point of view.

You are assuming a lot of things, such as that she LET the Medicaid lapse. I get the impression that this occurred because of address changes and that it simply didn't get resolved in time. You also assume that she understood how important oral hygiene was. Being poor is a different world and in that world, priorities are different. Dental hygiene is one of those things that doesn't reap an immediate benefit and, most of the time, it doesn't kill anyone.

Responsibility? Well, it's not as if she stayed "home" with them in her homeless shelter, standing over them to make sure they did their homework and brushed their teeth. This is a woman who had to work 3 jobs at one point to put a roof over her kids' heads and put food on the table. If she spent time in a homeless shelter, that just goes to how bad things have been for her recently. Poor is doing what you have to do to survive and sometimes, tragically, losing that fight despite your best efforts.

What I am basically trying to say is this: I will walk a mile in her shoes before I start judging her from my cushy, 2.5 bath middle class home where I stay home all day and devote most of my attention to my child. (eventually, children) My husband works 1 40 hour a week job where he gets medical and dental insurance and we go to a very good dentist who regularly lectures us on the importance of flossing.

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Shan
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Amen.
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The Pixiest
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quote:

Wait... isn't it her fault that she's poor? Isn't everyone in America born with equal rights and opportunities? Obviously she did something wrong if she's poor. She probably doesn't work hard enough or worship Jesus with all her heart or something.

No, she had 5 kids without a spouse to help her raise them, instead she relied on the goverment to take care of her and her kids and surprise surprise the goverment failed her.

Never *EVER* rely on the goverment to take care of you. Take care of yourself.

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Teshi
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quote:
And if you step back once more, the boy could have been saved with a toothbrush if his mother had just made him use it.
Although I recognise the obvious slant of this article, I think it is leaning just a little too far the other way to blame bad teeth- whether they be belonging to poor children, middle class children or rich children- on poor oral hygiene. Even if you brush three times a day, floss etc. there is still no guarantee that you will be cavity-free.

The irony of the cost of emergency brain surgery vs. the cost of even a biannual trip to the dentist- or even an annual one is perhaps the key thing for me. If this is a money issue, it failed. How long does it take a dentist to check for cavities? It takes mine about five minutes. For all six members of the family, that's half an hour. Yes, a treatment is longer and more expensive but a dentist can indentify problem areas before they become necessary to be dealt with.

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ketchupqueen
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quote:
I also can't understand allowing my kid's medical coverage to lapse and either be unaware or not get it corrected immediately.
The Medicaid system can be IMPOSSIBLE. It took us almost a year after moving here to get Emma covered, because they kept kicking us from one worker to another, losing forms, making us re-submit things, and being out of date on the information we kept updating-- for instance, Healthy Families denied us for making too little at the same time Medi-cal denied us for making too much. (You apply to both when you apply. We actually qualified for Healthy Families.)
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mackillian
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On (Not) Getting by in America
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Samprimary
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quote:
Originally posted by mackillian:
On (Not) Getting by in America

:>
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Christine
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There really seems to be a lack of understanding of poverty in America. We tend to believe that in this land of opportunity, those who fail to succeed do so because of their own bad choices or failings. I believed this for a long time, before I started dating my husband. He comes from rural poor. (Which, by the way, is different from urban poor in many ways. if I had to choose -- I'd take rural poor.) I guess in that way, he is the embodiment of the American dream because he now has a good job and we are living a firm middle class lifestyle.

Nevertheless, I have now seen what real families do to survive when things go bad...and they can go bad for a wide variety of reasons, regardless of age, work history, number of kids, or marital status. Low wage, low skill, no benefits jobs aren't good enough to support a person, let alone a family. Meanwhile, housing costs are incredible and nobody is keen on building low-income housing because there's no money in it. Heck, around here you can't find a new home going up for less than a quarter of a million dollars.

One day, just to see if I could do it, I tried to set up a budget with an $800 a month income. In this area, there simply is not an apartment available anywhere, even in the slums, for less than $400 a month. So there's half. Utilities will be another $100. Even if I avoid fresh fruits and vegetables and clip coupons, I can't seem to get groceries for less than $150 a month for one person. Since most places are scarce in the public transportation arena, you need a car and whoops...don't have the money for that. Or for clothes. Or health. Or dental. Now, all this is more doable in rural areas where you can actually get an apartment for about $200 a month, but it's still tight. And you still can't afford insurance. Add a child, and you're back to impossible. I'm honestly not sure how the working poor does it.

I don't necessarily think the answer is government intervention, but I do think that part of the problem is middle class people turning a blind eye and wanting to blame poor people for being poor or having too many children or not being married.

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Launchywiggin
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Being on the poor side of the spectrum, my philosophy:

Redistribute the wealth. yay communism.

This health care CEO makes 116 million dollars a year. I don't think anyone should be able to amass that kind of wealth.

In case no one saw it:How to blow 145 billion a year

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Annie
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Heh. Your budget scenario is freakish close to my life.
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Tresopax
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quote:
Never *EVER* rely on the goverment to take care of you. Take care of yourself.
Often it is not possible to take care of yourself.
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Belle
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quote:
Often it is not possible to take care of yourself.
Can you explain under what circumstances you think people shouldn't be able to take care of themselves? I'm not trying to be snarky, I really want to understand your reasoning behind that statement.

Unless you're thinking of children or those who are mentally or physically disabled to the point that they cannot work.

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Jon Boy
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Tresopax didn't say that you shouldn't be able to take care of yourself, but rather that sometimes it's not possible. Just because you can work doesn't mean you can make enough to pay for anything more than food and shelter. The book Mack linked to discusses that sort of problem.
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Christine
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quote:
Originally posted by Belle:

Unless you're thinking of children or those who are mentally or physically disabled to the point that they cannot work.

I can't speak for the original poster, but I will say that this is only part of what I see stopping certain individuals from caring for themselves.

The other part is a combination of economics and culture that really makes it difficult for a hard working person to get by. Most of what we've been discussing here are the working poor, especially those who work more than a full-time job to try to make ends meet. The fact that they still fail to make ends meet after working so many hours is a big concern to me because they really should be able to take care of themselves, and yet they can't. Here are just a few problems that I have seen:

1. Incredible housing costs (as I said a few posts up...cheapest slum dwelling you can get around here is $400 a month)
2. Residences zoned for single family use and a culture that does not support multiple unmarried adults living under one roof and sharing expenses
3. Health care costs
4. Transportation costs (in most places, you need a car)
5. Child care costs (if one parent working isn't enough, you have to do something with those kids and if you only have one parent then this is true as well)
6. Taxes (yes, most poor people will not end up paying income tax but they are still responsible for many other taxes including sales tax on groceries!)
7. Emergencies...poor people have no means of handling even the smallest emergency and when a large one comes up, they can be sunk.

These are just a few of the things I can think of off the top of my head that make it difficult for poor people. I don't know what the fix is, but this is how I see the problem.

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pH
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quote:
2. Residences zoned for single family use and a culture that does not support multiple unmarried adults living under one roof and sharing expenses

Where is this a huge issue? Granted, in this city there are some landlords who will not allow a man and a woman to rent together, but it's by no means impossible.

-pH

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ClaudiaTherese
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It is a widepread issue across the country. Living with more than the number of unmarried and/or unrelated adults allowed by zoning regulations puts one at risk for eviction and fines, both of which do happen on a fairly regular basis across the US.

e.g., San Marcos, Texas: Single-Family Zoning BS

I'd be happy to spend the time and energy to look up more links, either for individual cities' discussions or for summary statistics, but only if it will make a substantial difference to someone. That kind of digging takes work. I've had the information presented to me in various venues, but I don't have citations on hand.

---
Edited:

Additional background and details for Lousiana from The Daily Revielle:
quote:
Most neighborhoods near the University are zoned single-family. If three friends, for example, rent a three-bedroom house in a single-family zoned area and the neighbors can prove three unrelated people live in the house, the upset neighbors can hand over the evidence to the assistant parish attorney, who will take the landlord to court and get the renters evicted immediately.

In many cases, this is still happening.

In February, Lea Ann Batson, EBR assistant parish-attorney, took a local landlord to court for a zoning violation and forced his four student renters to move out in the middle of the semester. To prove the case, Batson said neighbors took photos of four cars parked in the driveway over about five months.

A lot of the linkable information online is to University student co-habitation issues. I think this reflects the general audience of online distributable news sources. However, this is also a substantial issue for all of those of low SES (perhaps excepting the rural poor, for whom city-style zoning is less of an issue).

[ March 02, 2007, 04:36 PM: Message edited by: ClaudiaTherese ]

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ketchupqueen
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Although it's not usually enforced, even if you have more than the allowed number of children you can get in trouble (for instance, if we had a third child, she would be counted when she turned one. The law requires no more than two people over age one per bedroom. We are in a two bedroom. If we were still here and had three children over the age of one, and our landlord decided to evict us for having five people in a two bedroom apartment, he could. I have also seen DCFS be called in for some other reason, and if there are too many people living in a residence threaten to take the children if the family does not move. In at least one case I've met children who were actually taken for that reason.)
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maui babe
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I wonder what the laws are here in Hawaii. I know that many many families here live in multi-family groups... it may even be the rule rather than the exception. Working for the department of health, I've investigated outbreaks that occurred in very small homes (maybe 600 sq ft) where 14 or 15 people lived - maybe a middle aged couple, their adult children and spouse and 4 or 5 grandchildren.

Especially certain immigrant groups here live in crowded conditions that I would never consider acceptable. But as far as I know, there are no laws against it here.

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ClaudiaTherese
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This is dense but fascinating: zoning in Hawaii e.g., "clean and sober homes"
Attorney General Opinion on "ohana dwellings"

---
Edited:

Doubtlessly these are regulations that are enforced under the discretion of the AG office. I wonder if the culture varies enough to make the handling of this much different in your neck of the woods. (?) Likely the laws & regulations themselves are quite different, just from the cursory read.

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pH
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CT, it's also worth noting that that article is a year and a half old. I only mention that because there's a housing shortage at the moment, and I know the state is trying to implement a bunch of different programs to help out with that.

ETA: Also, most homes very near the universities are duplexes. Those that are single-family generally have the owners living in them. But Michael and I have been looking around for a new place recently, and no one has said anything about us being unmarried. It IS a big issue in this area that a lot of landlords will not rent to undergrads, however.

-pH

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ClaudiaTherese
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I think there is a good deal of selective enforcement and blind-eye treatment going on here, though I don't have the stats at hand to back it up. I expect that if you are white, middle-class, and generally quiet adults, this is less of a problem than if you a dark-skinned group of persons with lots of little kids and who are seen as dirty (for whatever reason). Or if it's a matter of wanting to kick you out for other reasons (e.g., to raise the rent despite a lease), but being able to use this one.

quote:
Originally posted by pH:
CT, it's also worth noting that that article is a year and a half old.

Do you mean that in the sense of "only a year old" or "at least a year old"? (I'm just not sure what you are getting at -- i.e., whether you think the issue [or single-family zoning being a hurdle for those of limited means] is more or less at the fore right now in Louisiana.)
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pH
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I mean that, as I said previously, there's now a major housing shortage, which means the state is trying to make allowances and implement programs to encourage lower rents and so forth.

Edit: In other words, laws such as that one are the least of the problems. I will say that the no-undergrads thing did significantly limit my roommate's and my choices, but I suppose it's an understandable decision.

-pH

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ClaudiaTherese
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Ahhh ... okay. Got it.

In Madison, there was ongoing controversy about providing low-income-friendly housing, including SROs and multi-family dwellings. I recall the same in Urbana-Champaign. I think it's one of the bread-and-butter city planning issues, actually, although obviously quite exacerbated in Louisiana post-flood.

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