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Author Topic: Tell me about your laser eye surgery experiences
Valentine014
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I am considering getting LASIK done. I am having some eye problems related to my contacts (the doctors I have seen have given no specific diagnosis, but I think I may be allergic to contacts) and my sensitive skin is making glasses difficult to wear. After just a couple of hours the nose pads cause irritation, often breaking open the skin it touches. This problem is causing a lot of stress and pain and my husband and I think it's time I consider corrective surgery.

The money is not the issue here, it's my phobia of people touching my eyes. The idea of having my eyelids held open makes me dizzy and sick to my stomach. During one of my last exams, the doctor attempted to flip my eyelid and I got so nervous that I nearly threw up. He was only able to look at one eye flipped.

What I am looking for is for people to tell me about their surgery experiences, especially if they were done blade-free. How long did the procedure take? Did you have anxieties like mine? Also, why you chose to have the surgery done-was it due to problems with contacts, or because you were just sick of having to wear contacts/glasses?

Thanks in advance!

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Sala
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Good questions! I have similar eye-phobias as you and am looking forward to reading answers.
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TL
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They lead you into a room and lie you down beneath a device. You focus on a ring of orange lights. You hear a clicking sound. (That's the laser.) You feel no pain during the procedure, because your eyes have been numbed. "Don't look away from the lights," they tell you.

"What happens if I look away from the lights?"

"It'll just shave off a different part of your eye and you won't be able to see as well," they say cheerily.

"Oh, is that all?"

As you lie there, staring at the lights, listening to the clicking sound of the machine, the lights slowly go out of focus. They become an orange blur. Everything goes black. The orange blur becomes harder and harder to focus on. This is the part that freaked me out.

What is this? you think. Have these doctors gone mad? Are these twisted bastards blinding me? Have I walked into a William Burroughs novel?

No. It's all right. They're not blinding you.

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TL
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The procedure itself takes minutes. But prior to the procedure, there's a fair amount of time spent mapping your eye, having tests, and doing various things. I had two separate appointments before undergoing the surgery. In my case, they told me that my cornea were almost too thin for LASIK, and recommended PRK instead. The difference between PRK and LASIK, I was told, was with LASIK, they cut a flap into your cornea, use the laser to shape down your eye, and then put the flap back in place. With PRK, they don't cut a flap. They just laser your eyeball into shape.

I'm not sure if LASIK is painful, but PRK put me out of commission for a week with horrible, blinding, terrible, excruciating pain.

It also took, with PRK, about a month before I could see reasonably (to be able to focus on things near and far without the vision going blurry), and a few months before my vision was settled and consistently clear, the eyes healed, whatever.

I believe LASIK grants much easier relief. The eyes heal faster, the vision comes faster, and the pain, if there is pain, ain't that bad. I could be wrong.

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Vadon
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My question is how freaky is the eye-numbing?

Staring at an orange light is one thing, and not that scary. Seeing a needle coming right at you, that trips me out.

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TL
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They used eye drops on me. No needle.
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El JT de Spang
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I had LASIK. The eye numbing was a little freaky, but not nearly so much as the experience of having a flap of eye skin cut through and flipped back like a screen door. I didn't feel it, but I damn near had a panic attack at the thought of it.

The lasers were totally painless and science fiction-y, and 10 minutes after the procedure was done my vision tested better than 20/20. This was ten years ago and it's still 20/20.

If I had to do it again, though, I'd definitely take a valium or something prior to the procedure so I stayed calmer.

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scifibum
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I had blade free lasik done about a year ago. It was because I was tired of wearing (and cleaning, and breaking) glasses. I didn't really try contacts because my main issue was astigmatism and I read that contacts aren't great for that, plus I didn't want to put things in my eyes.

The surgery itself didn't take very long. The initial eye exams and consultations took a lot longer, like 2 hours. Surgery was about an hour in the office but only about 5-10 minutes of actual procedure. Most of it was waiting and getting eyedrops and taking valium and sitting in the recovery area waiting to be able to see a little bit again.

They give you valium for nerves. If you're extra nervous they can probably give you a bigger dose, I would guess.

Some of the eyedrops paralyze your eye a little bit. Probably some numbing effect too.

After drops took effect I went into the surgery room. (I got booties and a cap!)

I had to lay down on two different tables: one for flap creation and one for the corrective tissue removal.

The first machine suctions onto the eyeball and then blasts bubbles into the cornea with a laser to create a flap. This part put a lot of pressure on the eye and mostly blacked out my vision due to the pressure/suction (I guess). There was something holding my eyelids out of the way part of the time. One eye at a time. When done with this part it was like looking through dirty plastic lenses and a sweater. Nearly blind. I stumbled over to the next table (I was a bit miffed they didn't give me more assistance...they seemed to think I could see better than I could...I didn't really ask though).

On the second table they laid me down and used things to hold my eyes wide open. They used a tiny plastic tool to peel back the flap. Then I had to look at the light. They zapped some tissue. Supposedly the laser would track my eye movements but I still tried to keep still. Repeat for other eye.

Then I had to sit in recovery (this time they helped me walk over there) for 30 minutes. This part was uncomfortable - everything was very blurry and dark, and my eyes were starting to hurt a little bit. They put in some more eyedrops. After half an hour they looked at my eyes in an exam room to make sure everything looked OK and then they sent me on my way. My wife drove.

Lots and lots of eyedrops for days and weeks afterward. After 10 days it was just artificial tears but still every hour or two for the next couple of months.

I got a nifty DVD that consisted of closeup video of my eyes during the second laser procedure.

I tested at 20/15 three months afterward. I think I've lost a bit of that acuity as I find myself squinting at the TV now, but I think I'm still close to 20/20.

It was more frustrating than I anticipated to deal with night vision effects and constant maintenance the first few months. The night vision has mostly cleared up and I'm done with eyedrops so at this point it feels pretty good. I don't regret it but I wouldn't say it was a hugely beneficial thing for me. But if I'd had skin tearing from my glasses I'd probably say it was. [Smile]

Just talk to the surgeon about your nervousness and I'm sure they'll work with you to compensate. But the initial set of eye exams can be a lot more rigorous than a normal eye exam so be ready to suffer a bit.

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Valentine014
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This is all great information! All of your experiences sound positively horrifying. But I still have a few questions and comments:

TL: How long ago was your surgery?
JT: I will certainly be requesting pharmaceutical assistance. Glad to hear it has worked out so well for you.
Scifibum: Were the clamps uncomfortable, or were you numb enough to not feel? The hassle of "constant maintenance" you mentioned-was that just having to use eyedrops?

Also, in the informational packets I have been reading about different payment options. One option is $3290 for both eyes, 3 months of post-op care and $200 extra for "enhancements". The second option is $3675 for 12 months of follow up and free enhancements. Did any of you need follow ups past 3 months? Did you need enhancements?

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scifibum
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I paid about $3600 including 12 months of follow up (i'll have my final checkup in about a month) and I supposedly get a free enhancement if needed - not so far.

Yes, I'm talking about eyedrops. I only had to wear goggles to bed for the first week.

The clamps weren't exactly comfortable but it wasn't difficult to endure.

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TL
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My surgery was about 9 months ago. No follow ups after three months and no enhancements for me.
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Sterling
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My advice is: get a second (and if possible) third opinion on your viability for the surgery. There are a lot of clinics offering lasik right now, and my mother-in-law got two cheerful "sure, we can do lasik on you!" responses and a third, "This portion of your eye is too thin, there's a good chance lasik would substantially weaken your vision or even blind you, those guys who were offering to do this to you were nuts."

I'd also suggest you be aware of any conditions that might affect your blood pressure; my understanding is that lasik requires a (usually) three week recovery period in which your bp must remain in the normal range to promote proper healing.

That said, my uncle got lasik, and it's been great for him. I hope to do it myself some day.

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BlackBlade
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I had LASIK done 4 years ago, I had one follow up visit of my own volition a few month ago. I'm still 20/20 in one eye and 20/10 in the other. I had two or so preparation visits with the doctors where they mapped everything out.

The day of they had me lay down on a table, they gave me the numbing drops and told me to focus on a light, there was some clicking and then my eyes went foggy. When they use the laser to cut open your eyes it makes air bubbles the fog everything up. They then had me sit in a chair for 40 minutes until the bubbles had cleared. Then they peeled back the flaps, there was some more clicking, I could smell something like burning rubber, and then it was over. The lasers are set up specifically so that they will only fire when they are lined up with the correct portion of the eye. It also adjusts for eye movement, so you don't have to really worry about it going amuck.

The really obnoxious part is afterwards where you have to apply three different kinds of eye drops initially every fifteen minutes. After a few days of that you get to apply it every 30 minutes, then every few hours, then about three times a day. After about a month of doing that you're done.

I love my eyes, I am really grateful I had the procedure done.

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Sean Monahan
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I had my blade-free procedure done about 4 years ago. It was the best money I ever spent. Mine cost about $4k. The procedures described by others above are very similar to mine.

My doctor prescribed a valium to me about 45 mintues before it was my turn. That most definitely helped. As I went in and lay down, the nurse asked, "Are you nervous?" I considered and realized with a little surprise that I was not nervous in the least, although I had been nervous in the car on the way over (before the valium).

It helped that 1) the receptionist was very bubbly and extroverted. We were not a bunch of separate patients sitting in the waiting room - she drew us all into conversation with her and with each other as we waited. It was a kind of group therapy almost. 2) The waiting room had a window into the surgery room, where we could stand and watch the procedure being performed on others. This may not sound pleasant, but you would not believe how immensely therapeutic it was to be able to see it. Half the fear stems from just not knowing what is going to happen when you walk into the next room. It was very comforting to see people walk in, lay down, just lay there for about 10 minutes, then get up and walk out.

My surgery had to be customized a little. They had to cut a flap with a radius slightly larger than normal because, apparently, my pupils dilate larger than normal. They said that because of this, at night when my eyes dilate, I would see a ring around bright lights if I did not get the custom surgery, which cuts a bigger flap.

Before surgery, my eyesight was in the vicinity of 20/400. Now, it's about 20/15.

The only drawback is that my eyes are now very sensitive to cold air, and air blowing on them. In those conditions, they water easily. But I don't mind that much. I would do it again in a heartbeat.

Another drawback is that my doctor told me that since I'm a little older (I had the procedure done at 36), even if it goes perfectly, I may still need to start wearing reading glass in a few years. I haven't had the need yet.

I would recommend going to someone who really knows their stuff. Technically, the procedure should only be done on viable candidates, but to a clinic, everyone is a viable candidate (as Sterling intimated above). If you are located in or near Las Vegas, I'll recommend my doctor to you. (He's one of the few doctors in the area who is willing to correct the mistakes made by other, less proficient, doctors.)

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Shanna
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My only comment is that all of y'all are a million times braver than me. They'd have to give me a horse-sized dose of valium to even get me into the door. I'm still emotionally traumatized from the last time I had to get a cavity filled (they had to stick needles in my mouth so many times that I lost count.)

My mom's friend had hers done a few years back. She rode horses and just couldn't stand all the dirt that got in her contacts. I just remember her saying that she got one eye done at a time so that if anything went wrong, she wouldn't be completely blind. But this was atleast seven years ago, maybe more.

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mr_porteiro_head
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I considered getting laser surgery about a year ago because my dental/vision plan has been accumulating money for the last eight years, and I figured I might as well use it for something.

I went in to get tested for LASIK and I'm apparently a great candidate for laser surgery. But I was also told that if I do get the surgery, here in 10-15 years, I'd have to start wearing reading glasses anyway, but if I don't get the surgery, my prescription is just so that I'll never have to wear reading glasses in my life.

So it was a choice between always wearing glasses for far away and never for reading and wearing no glasses for a while, then always for reading, plus the risk factor.

Then I noticed that the woman who'd be giving me the surgery was wearing glasses. Apparently her eyes were similar to mine, and she was very open about the fact that she didn't want the surgery.

I ended up not getting the surgery.

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Vadon
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Well, all of your experiences sound rather unpleasant, but those of you who went through with it seem to find the whole process worth it.

Maybe I'll consider it in the future.

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Traceria
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quote:
Originally posted by scifibum:
I didn't really try contacts because my main issue was astigmatism and I read that contacts aren't great for that, plus I didn't want to put things in my eyes.

Yeah, you've got something there, because I have astigmatism in both eyes (which is apparently not that common) and have the devil of a time with contacts. My eye doctor tried to switch my weighted contact lenses to disposable ones (every two months), but those moved around so much and the axis would get so off. It's a little disconcerting to be driving down the road, blink, and have everything refuse to focus quite suddenly in one or both eyes. Anyway, I had to go for the uber-expsense (comparatively) year-long soft torque lenses instead. Those have been okay, but one day...one day...LASIK! This thread has been really informative!
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Noemon
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Val, my then-wife had LASEK done in 2002, and continues to think that she made a good choice. Her only regret about it is that she didn't accept the valium they offered her prior to the procedure; she was so scared that she actually cracked a crown (maybe several crowns? I think so, but can't remember for sure) as a result of clenching her teeth too tightly as the laser was moving into position.

She did her research before having the procedure done, and went to the absolute best clinic in the area (and one of the best in the country, happily), and that's something that I would recommend doing. If you're going to pay someone to fire laserbeams into your eyes, I think that it's worth doing a little research to make sure that the person who is going to be doing the work is very, very good at what they do (both in terms of diagnostics and the procedure itself). Kansas City's a little out of your way, but if you'd like the name of the place she went I'd be happy to give it to you.

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Valentine014
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Omaha has a ton of clinics to choose from, but KC is not that far, 2 1/2 hours, and I will be there in April, so yeah, let's get that name.
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scifibum
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quote:
Originally posted by Vadon:
Well, all of your experiences sound rather unpleasant, but those of you who went through with it seem to find the whole process worth it.

Maybe I'll consider it in the future.

I think as surgery goes it's downright fun. [Smile]
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Noemon
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quote:
Originally posted by Valentine014:
Omaha has a ton of clinics to choose from, but KC is not that far, 2 1/2 hours, and I will be there in April, so yeah, let's get that name.

It's Hunkeler Eye Institute. I think it was called Hunkeler Eye Center when Christine had her eyes done.
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Valentine014
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Thanks, I just emailed them to ask for some information to be sent to me.
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Noemon
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Cool! Hopefully they can recommend someone in Omaha if you decide not to make the trip to KC.
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Achilles
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When I had my LASER-eyes installed, it was a reletively new procedure. I tried to use them to burn my enemies, but the wavelength was too narrow, and could easily be defeated with a simple piece of red acetate.

Of course, they are still invaluable for scanning UPC codes at stores to find the prices.

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BandoCommando
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I had my LASIK done just over a month ago. I now see at 15/20 with minimal "halo effect" at night.

As operations have gone, I've definitely had worse.

On the day of the operation, I had a final eye-check and pre-op to double-check my prescription and make sure I was still a viable candidate (corneal thickness was the biggest concern since I was apparently on the thin side of normal).

Once I was cleared, they sent me to a waiting room where I was given a series of eye drops. There was an anti-biotic drop as well as several numbing drops put in. Additionally, I was given an oral anti-inflammatory painkiller (ibuprofin), and an oral sedative like Valium. The Valium was optional, but recommended to help us relax.

Additionally, they had my hair covered by a surgical hair net and wiped my eyelids with an alcohol swab with the warning to keep my eyes closed until the alcohol evaporated; that would have stung considerably.

When it was my turn, I was escorted into the room and seated on the operating chair next to a device that looked like a prop from a Star Trek sickbay.

The doctor introduced himself again (we had met before, during pre-op) and explained that it was his custom to recite a short prayer with his staff prior to each surgery and asked if I was comfortable with that.

After the prayer, they proceeded with the operation, one eye at a time. One of the assistants explained everything to me as the operation was proceeding, which was an added comfort. A device was used to prop my eyelids open. I barely felt it and the operation happened so quickly I felt that blinking would hardly have been necessary, but the device is their to prevent the reflexive blinking.

After the spring was in place, they used the micro-keratome blade to make the incision into the cornea. There was a certain amount of pressure experienced, almost like when I had to unstick a stubborn contact lens. When the corneal flap was peeled back, I couldn't see much other than the light I was told to focus on. There was a few seconds of clicking as they explained that those sounds were normal, and just seconds later they replaced the corneal flap and got it seated in place. Finally, they placed a contact lens with no prescription over the eye to act as a bandage.

From the time I entered the operating room to the time I left was about 5 minutes, at most. I was able to see nearly 20/20 right away.

That first day, I slept a lot after the surgery. Every hour for the first four hours I was to wake and put in a series of eye-drops. One was an anti-biotic (amoxycillin, I think), another was an anti-inflammatory steriod to reduce swelling around the incision (prednisolone), and the other was just a lubricating drop. Each eye drop was supposed to be put in with a five minute wait from the previous.

Discomfort was no worse than as if I had fallen asleep while wearing contacts. The eyes felt very dry, but there was instant relief whenever eyedrops were added. The lubricating drops were allowed to be put in as needed.

After the first 12 hours, the medicated eye drops were to be put in 4 times daily (8am, noon, 4pm, 8pm) with lubricating drops as needed. For the first week, you are told to be careful to not vigorously rub your eyes, as this can irritate the eye, and at worst, dislodge the corneal flap (bad, but not irreparable)

Now, just a day and a month later, I don't even need lubricating eyedrops, unless I'm staring at a TV or computer screen for a long time.

My LASIK was done at a place called the Pacific Cataract and Laser Institute. I highly recommend them, and they have locations throughout the Pacific NW. Assuming I continue with my annual check-ups, I'll have lifetime adjustments as necessary. They were very careful to screen me as a candidate and only operate where they feel it is a good idea. Even though it was not blade-free, there was minimal discomfort; as I said, I've had FAR worse surgeries, and I'm only 26!

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Noemon
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quote:
Originally posted by BandoCommando:
I'm only 26!

I thought that you were quite a bit older than that.

:: completely resets mental image of Bando ::

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Magson
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I'm having it done a week from today. I can't wait!
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BandoCommando
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quote:
Originally posted by Noemon:
quote:
Originally posted by BandoCommando:
I'm only 26!

I thought that you were quite a bit older than that.

:: completely resets mental image of Bando ::

... is that a good thing or a bad thing?
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Starsnuffer
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Perhaps if you want to reduce your anxiety about eye-poking you could try to desensitize yourself. Have someone you trust mess with your eyelids or stuff. Or just think about it happening and try to calm yourself down while doing so.
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Valentine014
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If only they would trust me to keep my eyelids open. I promise I won't blink, there is no need to use those awful Clockwork Orange clamps on me!

A big thanks to everyone willing to share their (very detailed) stories.

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Sean Monahan
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The worst part about the clamps was when they removed them. They were partially taped to my face, and they pulled the tape off somewhat slowly. The eyes didn't hurt at all, but the skin under the tape smarted.
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Amilia
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I got my eyes fixed in . . . 2000. I think. Was working 2 jobs at the time to pay for this so everything is something of a blur. Between it being so long ago, my crap memory, and lack of sleep at the time, my story isn't going to be as detailed as everyone else's.

They had a paper I had to sign listing all of the possible side effects--everything from blindness to DEATH. Which was sort of freaky, but I am vain enough that I just signed it anyway. Don't remember much else about the pre-op.

Morning of, I refused the Valium they offered me because they said it was just to help me sleep afterwords. They wanted me to sleep 8 (?) hours straight after the procedure. I had just come off of a graveyard at Denny's and knew I wouldn't have any trouble sleeping. Probably should have taken it anyway, just to help me relax during the procedure. They gave me a stuffed animal to hold while they worked. They warned me that the laser would make a loud popping noise and not to jump. I jumped anyway. They said it would not hurt and I would be in and out in 10 minutes. I was in and out in 10 minutes, but it did too hurt.

My sister drove me home and put me to bed. I was right about not needing anything to help me sleep. By the time I woke up that evening, I could see well enough to watch TV. I was back to work just fine the next day. Everyone's right, the eyedrops were a pain. Also, they tasted nasty as all get out.

I still have crap night vision. (Don't mention this to my grandmother, however. Freaks her out much more than it does me.)

Altogether, though, best thing I ever did. I love waking up in the morning and not having to hunt around for my glasses to see what time it is. I love being able to come in from the cold and still see. I love being able to regognize people in the swimming pool by their faces rather than the color of their swimming suits. I love that my eyelashes have grown out some. I love that I no longer have that permanent pinch mark over my nose. I love being able to wear eye make up if I want to without feeling that it is pointless when I will just be hiding my eyes behind my glasses. I love being able to show off one of my better features. (See, told you I was vain.)

Anyway, good luck what ever you decide.

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Elmer's Glue
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I think I'll just stick with contacts.
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Sean Monahan
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One other thing I remember now (and this may be off-putting) was the smell. Kind of like how, when a dentist is drilling your teeth, and you don't feel anything, but you can smell tooth smoke. Similarly, during my lasik surgery when the popping sound was happening (which is a lot like the sound a gas stove makes when you're trying to light it), I couldn't feel anything, but I could smell "burnt eyeball". It smelled a lot like burnt hair. This was the only thing about the procedure, to me, that was unpleasant. But not unbearably so.
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Lyrhawn
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quote:
Originally posted by Elmer's Glue:
I think I'll just stick with contacts.

That's what I figure.

The risks involved spook me too much. The procedure and what you have to do after it doesn't bother me so much, but I just have this feeling that if I get it done I'll be the one in a thousand horror story that has his eyes totally messed up.

I think when I'm older I'll have fewer problems with getting it done. I'm only 24, and having my eyes messed up at such a young age would be devastating, and I don't feel like living another 60 years with screwed up vision. When I'm older, I might not mind so much, and I expect the process will be even better. Until then, contacts will do.

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rivka
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quote:
Originally posted by Lyrhawn:
The risks involved spook me too much. The procedure and what you have to do after it doesn't bother me so much, but I just have this feeling that if I get it done I'll be the one in a thousand horror story that has his eyes totally messed up.

Ditto. Except I'm not so much afraid of being the one in a thousand that gets totally messed up. More of being the several in a hundred that has enough in the way of overcorrection or side effects (like halos) that they still end up with glasses.
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Lyrhawn
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That too, maybe more so, you're right.

If I'm going to spend a bunch of money with the sole purpose being to rid myself of some form of corrective lenses, then any result that leaves me still having to wear glasses or that impairs my vision in some meaningful way is unacceptable.

I guess I'm not afraid that I'm going to end up blind, but I hear some wicked stories of people who are left with halos, night blindness, and numerous other side effects that make them wish they'd never done it. And further surgeries can't always fix the problem.

I'm sure they'll perfect it with time and get the error rates down further and further. And when it reaches an acceptable level of risk, I'll be there waiting for it.

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Elmer's Glue
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The fact that anyone gets halos is reason enough for me not to get the surgery.

I just know I'd end up looking away while they are using the laser. I can't even stop myself from swallowing the fluoride at the dentist.

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BandoCommando
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I had halos for the first couple of weeks. Now, there is a very, very slight halo, but it's no worse than anything I'd have if my contacts were slightly dry, old, or dirty.

Part of my screening process included questions about how much stock we held in the idea of not having to wear corrective lenses anymore. The idea that was stressed throughout the pre-op information sessions was that LASIK is designed to "reduce dependency on corrective lenses".

The place I went to was able to provide me with their statistics for all of the surgeries they have performed. It was even broken down by patients' starting prescriptions. It turns out that something like 98% of people with my degree of myopia ended up with 30/20 (which is really good enough to not need glasses or contacts anymore) or better after the first operation. If a second operation was necessary, that became 99.98%.

They also gave statistics for side effects. These crippling side effects at my doctor's company were closer to one in several-hundred-thousand and by far better than the less expensive options out there.

I guess my point is that the surgeon's level of experience and skill really does make a big difference.

In the end, I ended up being pretty lucky, so far. I have 15/20 vision after one treatment, which puts me above the 99th percentile.

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Xavier
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quote:
It turns out that something like 98% of people with my degree of myopia ended up with 30/20 (which is really good enough to not need glasses or contacts anymore) or better after the first operation.
I have 30/20, and while I can get by without corrective lenses, having them makes me much more confident while driving. I also think they improve things when playing sports, reading things off a whiteboard at school, or for subtitles on the TV.
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BandoCommando
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I guess "good enough" is a term that is highly dependent on one's perspective. I was referring to 'good enough' as legally acceptable for driving a vehicle and so on. For me, 30/20 would have left me disappointed, but the statistics of previous surgeries indicate that result as being very infrequent.
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Tatiana
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My eyes were always fine, but in my 40s I started getting old-person-eyes making it hard to read things that are too close. It's all blurry and if I do the old-person-holding-my-arm-way-out-to-read thing, then sometimes the print is too small to read. I can no longer read fine print on labels and things without a magnifying glass.

I tried reading glasses but they gave me sick headaches day after day after day that never stopped. I finally gave up on glasses and just keep a magnifying glass handy to read fine print with. Something about the weirdness being limited to a small part of my field of view makes a magnifying glass not make me sick.

Does anyone know if they have lasix to correct old-people-eyes? If it gets much worse, it might start affecting my life more. As it is, I don't read books as often as I used to, because I can't just hit ctrl-+++ on them and increase the font size. (I'll get a kindle eventually and that'll fix that problem, but they don't have enough books on them yet. The books I like to read are mostly old and out of print. Eventually I plan to replace my whole library with a kindle or something like it, when they're good enough.)

Anyway, I'm getting annoyed at being so blind. I'm not a good candidate for contacts. Would Lasix work for me?

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scifibum
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It's possible Lasik could work. But the problem you have is most likely that your eyes have lost the ability to accommodate - the lens will no longer flex to move from distance focus to close focus. If you modify the cornea to compensate for this, you'll have the opposite problem - better close vision and worse distance vision.

This is also true of other surgical procedures to correct the problem, such as intraocular lens implants.

Some people opt to have farsightedness corrected in one eye only. Your brain can eventually learn to let the eye that's better at close vision dominate for tasks such as reading, while letting the other eye dominate for other tasks.

Have you worked with an optometrist to see if you can solve the headache problem?

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BlackBlade
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quote:
Some people opt to have farsightedness corrected in one eye only. Your brain can eventually learn to let the eye that's better at close vision dominate for tasks such as reading, while letting the other eye dominate for other tasks.

My father had this procedure done the same week that I had LASIK done. I know it sounds strange but your brain gets used to it. My father initially said, "What a stupid mistake I hate this!" But after a few weeks his brain made the necessary connections and now he is very happy with the procedure.

Elmer's Glue:

quote:
I just know I'd end up looking away while they are using the laser. I can't even stop myself from swallowing the fluoride at the dentist.
Again that really isn't a problem when you look away. The laser is fed a very detailed map of your eye and it won't fire the laser until it meets it's target. You cooperating certainly makes that much easier for the laser, but it typically will simply stop firing if you're looking about erratically.
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ClaudiaTherese
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I'm not familiar with the 15/20 or 30/20 indications. Is that the same as what I usually see as 20/15 or 20/30 (Snellen fractions), or is this a different form of measurement?

My own pair of eyes is one of the rare things that works well in my body. I don't know whether I would go for LASIK or not, but I imagine that's a hard thing to know if you aren't in the position of having to choose. Sight is so fundamental in orientating to the rest of our world, and it seems that our culture has developed around assumptions that sight is intact.

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Tatiana
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scifibum, my eye doctor just told me to keep trying and eventually I would get used to them. I don't think he realizes how bad it is. I think I'm different from other people in this respect, I mean. I tend to have dizziness and nausea easily anyway. I can't ride most of the rides at the park, and things that move on my computer screen make me sick. I usually even turn off the motion of the smilies. I never watch television because it's an unpleasant experience for me. Having the world do that Pinkie-and-The-Brain-behind-the-lab-flasks thing whenever I move my head just isn't something my brain is going to get used to.
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BandoCommando
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CT you're right. I just had the Snellen numbers backwards. Silly me.
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ClaudiaTherese
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You know, I've seen 6/6 and all sorts of odd numerical representations of vision tests. For all we know, you are perfectly accurate in a different scheme. [Smile]

(Vision testing is something I know only the barest minimum about, and I should work on that.)

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ketchupqueen
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My dad has a friend who was blinded by the, like, major super-famous LASIK doctor pioneer guy, head of associations and such. Her malpractice case has dragged on for years now because she takes the notes to people who say, "Yeah, he knew he shouldn't have lasered and he did anyway, he was totally wrong, I'll testify" and then they find out who it is and back out. She has lost all use of one eye and partial vision in the other.

That story has pretty much put me off laser eye surgery.

I used to be extremely irritated by my glasses' pads too. I switched to ones without pads...

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