FacebookTwitter
Hatrack River Forum Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Hatrack River Forum » Active Forums » Books, Films, Food and Culture » Public School/Religion Question (Page 3)

  This topic comprises 3 pages: 1  2  3   
Author Topic: Public School/Religion Question
steven
Member
Member # 8099

 - posted      Profile for steven   Email steven         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Teshi:
I believe that one-on-one or one-on-two is by far the best method of teaching children. Anyone who's worked with kids in class, groups and one-on-one can tell you that.

I can't disagree with that, at all, even though it undermines my argument. Having taught music, and had it taught to me, definitely proves this point, beyond all shadow of any doubt.


quote:
Originally posted by Teshi:

...I've worked with kids who come from reasonably well-off, stable families whose parents are totally checked out of their children's education and/or well being). But also for the reason that I believe I learnt some valuable skills in school, even as I lost out on some others. I was somewhat socialized and I can guarantee that wouldn't have happened at home. In a best case scenario, regular (public or private) schoolers learn to choose friends, learn to deal with people who aren't friends, learn to learn from teachers who don't have enough time for just them). These are useful skills, because the world is a bit like that.

The strange thing is, some kids seem to socialize just fine, even if they are homeschooled. Others just don't, and I don't really know how much is genetic, and how much is environmental. I know a homeschooled family where one sibling is totally social and well-adjusted, while the other...not even close.
Posts: 3285 | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
romanylass
Member
Member # 6306

 - posted      Profile for romanylass   Email romanylass         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I have two kids who are very, very social, in lots of activities, panty of friends- and one who is in only one activity under duress (swim, because I consider that a lifesaving skill) and has two good friends and maybe a handful of lesser ones. I would call him wella djusted, just introverted. The difference is that the social ones are like me and the less social one is JUST like dad.

[ November 09, 2009, 08:25 PM: Message edited by: romanylass ]

Posts: 2711 | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Sean Monahan
Member
Member # 9334

 - posted      Profile for Sean Monahan   Email Sean Monahan         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by romanylass:
I would call him wella djusted,

This is totally going to be my next RPG character name.

"You can call me - Wella Djusted."

Posts: 1080 | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
romanylass
Member
Member # 6306

 - posted      Profile for romanylass   Email romanylass         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
LOL! Glad to be of help. Of course, now I can't fix the typo.
Posts: 2711 | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Samprimary
Member
Member # 8561

 - posted      Profile for Samprimary   Email Samprimary         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
phoneticize it!

It's "Wella Justed"

Posts: 15419 | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Samprimary
Member
Member # 8561

 - posted      Profile for Samprimary   Email Samprimary         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Teshi:
I believe that one-on-one or one-on-two is by far the best method of teaching children. Anyone who's worked with kids in class, groups and one-on-one can tell you that.

if there was an option where you had licensed public teachers giving you one-on-one education as their 7-to-5 job, that would be the optimal situation.

Instead, you've got a choice (usually) between unlicensed untrained parents giving the one-on-one education with varying degrees of objective competence and focus and time dedication, and qualified teachers with full focus being divided up between a whole class.

Depending on the quality of your district and the quality of the parent's ability to homeschool, the homeschooling option CAN be the superior option, but isn't usually.

Posts: 15419 | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Farmgirl
Member
Member # 5567

 - posted      Profile for Farmgirl   Email Farmgirl         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I think Belle put the whole scenario very well. For many kids, the one-on-one of homeschooling is the best option for those who can do it, or who have strong feelings and/or fears about what their kids should be taught.

But it isn't possible for everyone, and public school fills the need for all others.

My whole point was just that too much now, parents are wanting the schools to accommodate everyone's "personal world view". So afraid of offense. Must bend the public school to my will, kind of thing (I don't even like Christian parents doing this, btw -- if they feel that strongly about it, they should homeschool).

But there is such an invasive fear of being "incorrect" now, that there is no personal responsibility, etc. You can't have your child bring a peanut butter sandwich into school anymore because someone other child might have peanut allergies (do they do away with all the sugar in the school lunches just in case one kid is diabetic? Where does the line of personal responsibility come in?)

You can and/or can't (depending) wear some particular head covering because it might be 1) gang sign 2) religious garb 3) offensive to people of other religions or gangs, etc.

You can't mention the word God because it might offend. People panic at the idea of a school function held in a church building, or of a church renting a school facility, like something evil from that might rub off on them.

It is just all this over-reaction that I detest. Parents say "not around my little Johnny!" but everyone has different definitions of what little Johnny needs, and public schools get torn limb from limb trying to accommodate it all. (That is the reason I said if a parent has STRONG feelings on a particular world view, they should homeschool if they don't want their children to ever be exposed to other world views).

When I was growing up, I did not celebrate Christmas (I'm not going to explain that here, so don't ask). I was the only one in the entire school who would not participate in that celebration (which goes on for much more than one day, as you know). In a strongly religious community and public school, I was not exactly looked on favorably for this view. I didn't try to make others "convert" to my view, no, I just said "I'm not going to do that." Even as young as fourth grade, I would calmly explain to my teachers my beliefs, and I myself would come up with alternatives to the Christmas-based assignments (whether it be coloring a Christmas tree, or singing in the Christmas operetta). I didn't insist that no one in the whole school should celebrate Christmas. I didn't throw a fit and make a big deal. I just took responsibility for my own education and did alternative credit work.

And I don't see that type of thing happening these days. Instead of being content with "I believe different and here is how we can work it out" people instead are suing schools, making big media ploys, raising Cain, and in general trying to make school be specialized to their whims, to hell with everyone else. (and the first post in this thread showed this kind of thinking).

THAT was my point. [/soapbox]

Posts: 9538 | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
rivka
Member
Member # 4859

 - posted      Profile for rivka   Email rivka         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Well said.
Posts: 32919 | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Hobbes
Member
Member # 433

 - posted      Profile for Hobbes   Email Hobbes         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I feel like a lot of time adults get excised by things that matter to them and thus small slights or pressures exhibited in school groups that stem from issues they care about are considered unacceptable, whereas the things the actual children care about tend to spark much larger emotional reactions for the kids. An example being sports during recess was an almost infinitely larger source for teasing and humiliation than religion or skin color at my grade schools: yet all the focus from the adults was on the latter two. Of course that being said, what Farmgirl said is absolutely right: the solution isn't to pounce on anything that could cause a feeling of being different but to recognize that children are in general rather resilient, and that challenges at any age of life are the source of growth. Trying to remove any possible source of unhappiness is not only futile, but would be disastrous if successful.

Hobbes [Smile]

Posts: 10602 | Registered: Oct 1999  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
romanylass
Member
Member # 6306

 - posted      Profile for romanylass   Email romanylass         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Samprimary:
quote:
Originally posted by Teshi:
I believe that one-on-one or one-on-two is by far the best method of teaching children. Anyone who's worked with kids in class, groups and one-on-one can tell you that.

if there was an option where you had licensed public teachers giving you one-on-one education as their 7-to-5 job, that would be the optimal situation.

Instead, you've got a choice (usually) between unlicensed untrained parents giving the one-on-one education with varying degrees of objective competence and focus and time dedication, and qualified teachers with full focus being divided up between a whole class.

Depending on the quality of your district and the quality of the parent's ability to homeschool, the homeschooling option CAN be the superior option, but isn't usually.

I can't speak for all states, but in WA you are required to either have a Bachelors or take a parent educator course.
Posts: 2711 | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Belle
Member
Member # 2314

 - posted      Profile for Belle   Email Belle         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
That is not the case in Alabama. The parent can homeschool up to grade 12 even if that parent never graduated high school themselves.

You must participate in some kind of cover school, but the only requirements many cover schools have are that you keep attendance.

Posts: 14428 | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kmbboots
Member
Member # 8576

 - posted      Profile for kmbboots   Email kmbboots         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My sister homeschooled my nieces (not for any ideological reason; the schools in her district just sucked) until high school. Although my sister doesn't have any kind of degree, judging from my nieces' success in high school and college, it wasn't a problem.

[ November 10, 2009, 06:42 PM: Message edited by: kmbboots ]

Posts: 11187 | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
  This topic comprises 3 pages: 1  2  3   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.
UBB Code™ Images not permitted.
Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Hatrack River Home Page

Copyright © 2008 Hatrack River Enterprises Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.


Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2