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Author Topic: Where are you from?
Elizabeth
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Try this:

http://www.memegen.net/view/show/2313

Apologies if this has been posted before.

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Bella Bee
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This is me:

quote:
New York City. You are most definitely from New York City. Not New Jersey, not Connecticut. If you are from Jersey then you can probably get into New York City in 10 minutes or less.
Who knew NY and London have the same accent? [Smile]
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erosomniac
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Never seen it before, but it's brutally inaccurate.
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Artemisia Tridentata
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Well, It worked for me. "Western", and the map looked a lot like the Great Basin with that other stuff tacked onto the left edge.
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mr_porteiro_head
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Western? All I get is Western?
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Uprooted
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I got the New York City one as well, and I am from Long Island. I honestly don't know anymore how I say a lot of those words; I don't think I have a pronounced NY accent any longer, but I certainly grew up with one. The test did identify a lot of the sounds that I've noticed as markers for the differences between NY and other regional accents. Although I don't think that the accent is restricted to within ten minutes of NYC by any means.
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steven
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Southern.

Well, I can do a good impression of a Wisconsinite. However, I definitely have a Southern accent. Sometimes I do use a Northern pronunciation of a specific word for clarity.

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rollainm
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quote:
Western. Like Midland, Western is another accent that people consider neutral. So, you might not actually be from the Western half of the country, but you definitely sound like it.
I've never been further west than Alabama*, but I guess I agree with my results.

*Am I the only one that can't say Alabama without thinking "AluhBAyuma"? I never actually vocalize it, but I always feel slightly embarrassed just for thinking it. Yeah, I know. I'm weird.

[ July 12, 2007, 08:40 PM: Message edited by: rollainm ]

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Liz B
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Hm. I got the one that "used to set the standard for American English pronunciation"--inland north.

I grew up in central PA, but I most certainly do not have that accent, so I really didn't expect for it to peg me as from there. (The central PA accent seems to be a lot like the Baltimore accent, based only on hearing people imitating the Baltimore accent.)

That was interesting.

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ElJay
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It listed two for me. First Midland -- "The Midland (please don't confuse with "Midwest") itself is the neutral zone between the North and South. But just because you have a Midland accent doesn't mean you're from there. Since it is considered a neutral, default, "non-regional" accent you could easily be from someplace without its own accent, like Florida, or a big city in the South like Dallas, Houston, or Atlanta." And then Southern -- "Love it or hate it, your accent says you're probably from somewhere south of the Ohio River."
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Elizabeth
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I ended up with New Jersey-PA region. I grew up all over the place, and when I was taking the test, I realized the things my grandmother changed. I use to say "Spanish" sort of like "Spayahnish"Besy I can do, and she would go crazy, saying it was "Spanish" with an a like apple.

And my step-mom is from Jersey, and I say "berry" different fro "bury" now, where it was ll one sound when I was younger. I also used to say "yuman" for human, with no h-ish sound.

I thought it was interesting, and I think it would make sense that Bella Bee be placed with the New Yorkers.

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breyerchic04
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Midland, spot on.
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Nighthawk
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Western.

Considering I'm in Miami, Florida, I'd say that's a wee bit off.

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Shanna
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quote:
Midland. The Midland (please don't confuse with "Midwest") itself is the neutral zone between the North and South. But just because you have a Midland accent doesn't mean you're from there. Since it is considered a neutral, default, "non-regional" accent you could easily be from someplace without its own accent, like Florida, or a big city in the South like Dallas, Houston, or Atlanta.
They got me very right. My parents are from St. Louis and I grew up in Houston.

Though my parents have some weird words that my brother and I have forced ourselves to unlearn. For example, they say "don't forget to WORSH your dishes" or "George WORSHington."

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TheTick
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South first, then Midland.
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plaid
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quote:
Northeastern. You're probably from somewhere near New York City, possibly north Jersey, or Connecticut or Rhode Island.
Pretty good -- central NJ. I doubt if the program could've figured me out if it'd been an actual audio test -- I have a goofy Bob Dylan/Monty Python/French sort of accent that's pretty unique. (For some reason, whenever I talk with Southern folks, it REALLY confuses them, and they're always asking me if I'm from Africa or the Mid East or something...)
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Salsa
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Yeah the guy that made it did a good job. Western.
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The Pixiest
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Midland. that's me.
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baduffer
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Southern, and I thought I left that behind long ago.
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Kwea
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Midland...and I was born in Pittsburgh. [Smile] But I grew up in MI, then lived in MA for 12 years, although it was on the western side of MA, not Boston. [Smile]


I am a hodgepodge. [Smile]

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CaySedai
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He forgot "creek" (does it rhyme with sick or seek?) ;-)

I got Midland. I did live in southern Iowa for a few years while growing up, but then moved to central then north central Iowa. And moved quite a bit after growing up. I guess the few years in southern Iowa had more of an effect than I thought.

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Sharpie
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Dead on for me -- Eastern New England.

I'm actually surprised. No one ever guesses where I'm from by the way I talk...

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Vadon
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I got Eastern New England. Like Vermont and Maine...

Considering I learned to talk in Washington State...

Though I imagine I'm a little mixed. I learned to talk and have maintained most of the qualities of Washington(I think), but I've lived in Utah for the past... seven years or so, so maybe some things changed it to sound Eastern New England?

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Earendil18
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All wrong! I'm inland northwest! Pure Washingtonian!

And it tells me I'm from northern Minnesota. NOPE! [Smile]

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Luet13
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I got Midland and Southern which makes perfect sense. I've lived in Chicago my whole life, but spent a lot of time in Mississippi when I was young. I am definitely comfortable with my pseudo-southern accent. [Smile]
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Vadon
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quote:
Originally posted by Earendil18:
All wrong! I'm inland northwest! Pure Washingtonian!

And it tells me I'm from northern Minnesota. NOPE! [Smile]

Despite being a western Washingtonian myself, maybe it just can't recognize us? [Smile]
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Salsa
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Yeah I'm Washingtonian too!
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Reshpeckobiggle
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Midlander. I was surprised, but then it said I could be from Florida or a Atlanta and have that accent. I've lived in both of those places for most of my life. What I don't understand is that living here in Colorado, I don't hear many Coloradoans with an accent any different than mine. So what's the difference between Western and Midlander?
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Lyrhawn
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Not bad, I got Northern first and then Midland, considering I live on the border of those two areas, I'd say it was spot on.
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anti_maven
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Cool - I am from Plymouth in the UK, and my "American accent" is from the Northeast:

"Northeastern.
You're probably from somewhere near New York City, possibly north Jersey, or Connecticut or Rhode Island. If you are from New York City you may be one of the types who people never believe when you say you're from New York."

So I'm a Plymothian from which ever side of the Atlantic you look...

[Big Grin]

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Kettricken
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I'm from London and also got

quote:
New York City. You are most definitely from New York City. Not New Jersey, not Connecticut. If you are from Jersey then you can probably get into New York City in 10 minutes or less.

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Kama
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I got NY too. apparently all non-americans get that or the area [Razz]
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Lisa
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quote:
Northern. Whether you have the world famous Inland North accent of the Great Lakes area, or the radio-friendly sound of upstate NY and western New England, your accent is what used to set the standard for American English pronunciation (not much anymore now that the Inland North sounds like it does).
They had Chicago on the map, so I guess they were right.
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Javert
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They said I'm from the west. I'm from Connecticut. Not terribly accurate, that.
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ClaudiaTherese
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It assesses me as "Northern," but I'm from the Ohio River Valley (southern tip of Indiana, outside the mapped range). However, my mother was excruciating on our pronunciation, and I was often asked where I was from when I was growing up.
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El JT de Spang
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I did guess that I was a Southerner, but 'southerner' was defined as anywhere from El Paso to D.C. and anywhere south of Indiana or Missouri.
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Farmgirl
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quote:
Western is another accent that people consider neutral.
Apparently I'm neutral (although Kansas doesn't really show on that Western map). But I know that many people consider Kansans to have a more "neutral" accent - hence why so many call centers build here (or so I'm told)

FG

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Javert Hugo
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Western.

That makes sense. I used to have a Texas drawl, but I've lost it along the way and I guess it's become nuetral.

*sad* I miss my drawl.

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Aegon
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It says im Western when I grew up in Maine and have spent the last 3 years just outside of Boston.heh

The only way it could be more wrong was if it said Southern.

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The Rabbit
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I came out as Midland which makes sense. Although I've lived most of my life in the west, I spent several years of my childhood in Pennsylvania so my accent is just a bit different from the western accent, both of which are considered 'neutral'.
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kmbboots
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Northern. In other words, boring.
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The Rabbit
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quote:
Originally posted by Reshpeckobiggle:
Midlander. I was surprised, but then it said I could be from Florida or a Atlanta and have that accent. I've lived in both of those places for most of my life. What I don't understand is that living here in Colorado, I don't hear many Coloradoans with an accent any different than mine. So what's the difference between Western and Midlander?

I think the difference is very small. Midlanders are more likely to pick the 'sort of the same but not exactly answers' than westerners. I think westerners say 'roof' like 'foot' rather than like 'food' and are likely at least occasionally to say 'I' like 'ah' where as midlanders aren't.

I could be wrong but that fits both my personal experience and the text. The first time I took it I came out as a Midlander. When I got rid of the sort of answers but didn't change the roof and I answers, I came out as Midwest and when I changed the roof and I answers I ended up western.

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Javert Hugo
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Hmm...okay, I have a theory.

These are based on imcomplete information.

I find it very hard to believe that while there is apparently wild variation in the Eastern part of the US, there is no variation in accent from Washington to New Mexico, from L.A. to Montana, from San Francisco to Wyoming.

Anyone else think "Western" is the lazy way of passing off what they haven't studied enough yet?

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The Rabbit
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quote:
Originally posted by Javert Hugo:
Hmm...okay, I have a theory.

These are based on imcomplete information.

I find it very hard to believe that while there is apparently wild variation in the Eastern part of the US, there is no variation in accent from Washington to New Mexico, from L.A. to Montana, from San Francisco to Wyoming.

Anyone else think "Western" is the lazy way of passing off what they haven't studied enough yet?

I've lived in Washington, New Mexico, Montana and Utah and by in large I think thats a reasonable assessment. What I've observed in all those areas is that the only people who have an 'accent' are those who come from very small rural communities. To some extent those are cultivate just like in Texas.

Have you ever wondered why GW Bush speaks with a Texan drawl when he grew up in the Northeast?

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Mig
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North Central, Western, and Eastern New England. Wide off the mark.

I was born in Cuba and raised in Miami. Learned English as a sacond language. My North Florida freinds and wife have always said that I have the Miami Accent.

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Uprooted
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I'm curious about some of them.

Where in the U.S. does father not rhyme with bother, and what is the difference in pronunciation? Where is the "a" in add different from the one in mad? How about the i in write/price vs. ride/prize? Those all sound totally the same to me and I can't even picture what the variant pronunciation sounds like. And where does bag rhyme with vague?

I know that my "different" responses were all markers for the NY accent, which is probably why the Londoners are getting the NY response--even though the accents are completely different, there are some commonalities in vowel pronunciation: merry/marry/Mary all different, cot/caught & don/dawn different, "o" in horrible sounds like "hot" not "for". (Although the latter is one of the modifications in my own speech--I say it more like "for" now. Same for orange, which was a definite "Ah-rinj" not "ornj" or "or-inj" when I was growing up.)

ETA: found partial answers to my questions at http://freeshells.ch/~xavier/survey.html

[ July 13, 2007, 11:02 AM: Message edited by: Uprooted ]

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Leonide
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My second choice was spot-on. Pretty cool.
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Javert Hugo
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quote:
Have you ever wondered why GW Bush speaks with a Texan drawl when he grew up in the Northeast?
Considering he moved to Midland, Texas when he was two years old...no. I only wonder at your sources.
quote:
As the eldest son of George H. W. Bush and Barbara Pierce Bush, George Walker Bush was born on July 6, 1946, in New Haven, Connecticut while his father was an undergraduate student at Yale2. By the time George was two, the family had moved to West Texas, where his father started working in the oil industry. When the Bush family first moved to Midland, they bought a house at 405 East Maple3, among a cluster of tiny colorful houses in a development nicknamed Easter Egg Row4. In November of 19515, the Bushes purchased a larger home for their growing family at 1412 W. Ohio Avenue. This home was built in 1939, but by the time the Bush Family occupied the Home, it had two additions bringing the size to 1547 square-feet plus a detached garage.

President George W. Bush has expressed fond memories of his childhood home on W. Ohio where he attended nearby Sam Houston Elementary School and then San Jacinto Junior High. He began high school in Houston, Texas, at Kincaid High School and then followed in the footsteps of his father by completing his high school education at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts.

Seriously, there are enough reasons to discredit the President. You don't have to resort to making them up.

Are all your political opinions derived from sources as reliable?

[ July 13, 2007, 11:07 AM: Message edited by: Javert Hugo ]

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ketchupqueen
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Midland. Grew up in CA but lived in Dallas for two years, which sometimes influences the way I talk a bit, and two grandparents were from KS and one from OK, which influenced the way I talk a lot. [Smile] So pretty spot-on.
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BlackBlade
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Midland, followed by Northern. I do not know how I was supposed to place at all. My father is from Utah, and my mother is from California/Oklahoma. I grew up in Hong Kong with a brief stint in Malaysia. The English I was surrounded with was completely different on a day to day basis.

Though I live in Utah now, I abhore the way they speak English. Utah however, is pretty neutral as far as accents go. There is a VOWEL called the letter A in every day of the week. It OUGHT to be pronouced! Why would you pronounce Sunday as "Sun DEE?!" Do you say, "There are seven DEES in the week? No, nobody does it, so why discriminate when it comes to the days of the week?"

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