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» Hatrack River Forum » Active Forums » Books, Films, Food and Culture » Ask the Rebbetzin (Page 24)

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Author Topic: Ask the Rebbetzin
rivka
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I've had (fairly good) baked latkes on Chanukah. If you spray the pans with olive oil, you're even yotzi! [Wink]

My mom doesn't like greasy foods -- or at least, they don't like her. So she makes baked latkes. Or my sister does. Sadly (for me, although not for them), this year my parents will be away for Chanukah.

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Armoth
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This thread is making me so hungry!

Thanks Rivka, my mom makes a wicked latka so I think I'll just pick some up from her.

I love Chanukah...

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rivka
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quote:
Originally posted by Armoth:
Thanks Rivka, my mom makes a wicked latka so I think I'll just pick some up from her.

Probably less of a shlep.
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ketchupqueen
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This thread is making me hungry. For latkes. And I have a stomach virus. [Frown]
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PSI Teleport
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Re: Cauliflower in place of potatoes

My roommate has Type 1 Diabetes and always uses cauliflower in place of potatoes. She makes this Shepherd's Pie with mashed cauliflower...it is amazing.

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Stephan
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I'm thinking about doing a short lesson on Chanukah for my students tomorrow, since they are clueless about it. Curious what you all would include if it were up to you.
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lobo
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Sorry if this has been answered on one of the 24 pages of this post...

Why the different spellings for Hanukkah (Chanukah)? I see Hanukkah much more, and it seems that the Chanukah crowd try to make a point that they are spelling it right. Insights?

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Armoth
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quote:
Originally posted by lobo:
Sorry if this has been answered on one of the 24 pages of this post...

Why the different spellings for Hanukkah (Chanukah)? I see Hanukkah much more, and it seems that the Chanukah crowd try to make a point that they are spelling it right. Insights?

::shrug:: Doesn't matter to me. Hanukkah seems to be the way to spell it if one is not at all concerned with the true Hebrew pronunciation. Chanukah seems more natural to me - the Ch resembling the sound of a Chaff, pronounced as a guttural, kinda like the noise you make before you spit.
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Stephan
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You are taking a language with a different alphabet and translating into English. There really is no one way to do it. I had to explain the same thing to my students when we studied Egypt, and they saw different spellings for the names of pharaohs.
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Lisa
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Actually, Armoth, I think Hanukkah is the most faithful to the Hebrew. A het is much closer to a heh (\h\) than it is to the English \ch\ sound. And like it or not, most English speakers read \ch\ as in cherry. Not as in achtung. Actually, a het is closer to a heh than it is to a khaf. I'd rather have someone pronounce Hanukkah with an \h\ than with a \ch\ as in cherry.

My partner spells her name Havah. Not Chava. And I've heard people pronounce Chava like a Germanic "java".

What irks me is two \n\s. In Hebrew, the kaf has a dagesh (dot), which means it really is doubled. The nun does not. And I'm ambivalent about ending with an \h\ to match the Hebrew heh. But I write Torah and not Tora (though my daughter's name is spelled Tova and not Tovah, so I guess I'm not all that consistent after all).

Btw, Stephan, the thing with Egyptian royal names is also a matter of different readings. The order of the elements that make up a name in ancient Egyptian is sometimes arbitrary. So for example, Pasenhor and Horpasen are both conjectural readings for the same name.

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Stephan
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quote:
Originally posted by Lisa:

Btw, Stephan, the thing with Egyptian royal names is also a matter of different readings. The order of the elements that make up a name in ancient Egyptian is sometimes arbitrary. So for example, Pasenhor and Horpasen are both conjectural readings for the same name.

Thanks! I'll mention that when I come back to it next year.
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Mrs.M
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Do any of y'all know of a place that will ship uncut OU or OUD bagels to Richmond before the 17th?

Apparently our shul can't get uncut bagels here. I honestly can't imagine why not and I don't know why they don't have other resources. Since my mother-in-law is coming from NYC, I asked her to bring the bagels. The plan was that she would bring them on the train and we'd deliver them to the shul to be frozen until the naming. She told me it would be easy for her to do. I figured it shouldn't be hard to find kosher bagels in NYC, right? It is if you're my mother-in-law (who is Jewish, btw). So now I'm stuck trying to find these bagels, which is the last thing I need to be doing right now.

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rivka
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H&H Bagels
Star-K (which is at least as strict as the O-U), parve -- even yoshon!) and overnight shipping to anywhere in the US.

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Minerva
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Bagel Boss ships. Their bagels are pas yisroel.
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Lisa
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Maybe they want to use them for lechem mishneh on Shabbat.
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Lisa
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Btw, I don't know whether anyone has mentioned this (and I have no connection to them other than once having received a birthday gift from my coworkers), but if you haven't tried Fairytale Brownies, you're missing out. They're kosher, and unbelievably yummy.
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Minerva
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Are they chalav yisroel? I've been looking very hard for prepackaged brownies without much success.
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adenam
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no they're not. someone gave them as a prsesent to my family and I'm the only one who can't eat them [Frown]
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rivka
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Looks like no. They do look yummy though.
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ketchupqueen
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(For other non-Jews who were interested in the discussion of chalav yisroel: I had had this discussion with Rivka in person once but was fuzzy on the details, and found this article which clarified things for me again. Someone please tell me if that article is not accurate. [Smile] )
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rivka
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Quite accurate. And the O-U is always a good source for kosher-related questions.
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ketchupqueen
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That's what I figured. [Smile] Thanks rivka.
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Mrs.M
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We ended up getting them from Bagels & Co. They were delicious.

The babies and my mother and I missed the naming, because I underestimated the time it would take to get 2 newborn and a toddler ready in the worst cold snap in Richmond in years. I didn't even change the twins out of their sleepers. The Hebrew names are:

Leni Ann = Leah Aviva
Camille Victoria = Sarah Yael

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Jhai
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How important is the oral tradition in relation to the Torah? Just as important? Less important?

Also, I think I read somewhere here on Hatrack (maybe from Tom D.) that there's a tradition or story about arguing with God & winning? Any light to be shed on that?

Thanks!

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ketchupqueen
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quote:
Originally posted by Mrs.M:
We ended up getting them from Bagels & Co. They were delicious.

The babies and my mother and I missed the naming, because I underestimated the time it would take to get 2 newborn and a toddler ready in the worst cold snap in Richmond in years. I didn't even change the twins out of their sleepers. The Hebrew names are:

Leni Ann = Leah Aviva
Camille Victoria = Sarah Yael

I like them! BTW, how do you pronounce "Leni?" Is it "Lennie" or "Laney?"
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rivka
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quote:
Originally posted by Jhai:
How important is the oral tradition in relation to the Torah? Just as important? Less important?

The Oral Law (which was much later transcribed as the Talmud) was given at Sinai, just as the Written was. Trying to understand the Written without the Oral is like trying to read someone else's notes -- in shorthand -- from a lecture you didn't attend.

quote:
Originally posted by Jhai:
Also, I think I read somewhere here on Hatrack (maybe from Tom D.) that there's a tradition or story about arguing with God & winning? Any light to be shed on that?

You're going to have to be more specific. Jews have a long tradition of arguing with God -- goes all the way back to Avraham (who argued about S'dom).
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Armoth
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That reminds me of the story of Rachel...is that what you are referring to?

[ January 22, 2009, 01:41 AM: Message edited by: Armoth ]

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Lisa
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I think the story in question is Akhnai's oven.

Link.

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Lisa
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quote:
Originally posted by Jhai:
How important is the oral tradition in relation to the Torah? Just as important? Less important?

Torah 101: The Thread

Torah 101: The Blog

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pooka
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When babies are transitioning from breastfeeding to solid food, do they have to stick to dairy and parve food? Sorry if this has been asked before. I was reading a pretty old thread on sakeriver yesterday that sparked the question.
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Stephan
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I can't imagine it being a burden if it is. Even my Similac has the kosher symbols on it.
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Minerva
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Breastmilk is pareve, like a vegetable. It can be eaten with milk or meat (but not milk and meat at the same time).
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rivka
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Exactly right. In fact, if one wished to use it in cooking for adults, one could do so. I think I'll stick with soy and rice milk. [Wink]
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Lisa
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I believe it's actually assur for adults. At least I remember hearing that.
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Minerva
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I have a friend who made cheese with the last of her freezer stash after her last child weaned. Her rav told her that she could only feed the cheese to children under 2.
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Shmuel
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quote:
Originally posted by Lisa:
I believe it's actually assur for adults. At least I remember hearing that.

Not as far as I know. There may be a prohibition against adults suckling it directly from a woman -- and I'm guessing that's a gezeirah on moral grounds -- but drinking expressed milk is fine.

One caveat to Rivka's statement is that while human milk is pareve, intentionally cooking it together with meat is forbidden, due to maris ayin (that is, people might see it and think you're cooking dairy milk with meat). See Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh Deah, 87:4.

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theCrowsWife
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quote:
Originally posted by Shmuel:
One caveat to Rivka's statement is that while human milk is pareve, intentionally cooking it together with meat is forbidden, due to maris ayin (that is, people might see it and think you're cooking dairy milk with meat). See Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh Deah, 87:4.

Would that mean that cooking rice or soy milk with meat would also be forbidden?

--Mel

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Shmuel
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quote:
Originally posted by theCrowsWife:
Would that mean that cooking rice or soy milk with meat would also be forbidden?

In theory, had it been around at the time when most of these rules were being enacted, I suppose it might have been.

On the other hand -- and I think this is a key point -- had soy milk been common centuries ago, it might have been taken for granted that people would know it was soy... human milk has been around forever, but it's never been something people usually cook with. (See Rabbi Ovadia Yosef's position regarding margarine and pareve ice cream.)

Finally, one might note that soy milk is normally in a distinctive container, making such confusion unlikely.

(With all of that having been said, I'm answering off the cuff here. Ask your local rabbi, etc.)

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rivka
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quote:
Originally posted by Shmuel:
One caveat to Rivka's statement is that while human milk is pareve, intentionally cooking it together with meat is forbidden, due to maris ayin (that is, people might see it and think you're cooking dairy milk with meat).

Leave the container on the table? [Wink]

Also, while I have never asked the sheiloh myself, I know women who have been told they could use it in cooking -- for adults. As Minerva's friend's answer proves, that is not a universally-held position. There are similarly divergent opinions on whether soy/rice/almond milks are currently an issue or not.

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Minerva
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Sometimes, if someone serves something with almond milk, they will put a couple of almonds on the dish just to make it a little clearer. And everyone I know cooks with soy milk/margarine all of the time, no problem. The issue might be a little more pronounced if it were something like soy cheese on a burger, where it clearly looks like something prohibited.

Also, just from a practical standpoint, human milk often has a strong flavor (like the foods that the mother has eaten), and probably wouldn't be good in most dishes anyway.

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rivka
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quote:
Originally posted by Minerva:
Also, just from a practical standpoint, human milk often has a strong flavor (like the foods that the mother has eaten), and probably wouldn't be good in most dishes anyway.

Also true.
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Shmuel
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quote:
Originally posted by Minerva:
The issue might be a little more pronounced if it were something like soy cheese on a burger, where it clearly looks like something prohibited.

I've seen kosher pizzarias on both sides of this... one with pareve "cheese" and real meat (there was very prominent signage explaining this; I would imagine the boxes were emphatic about this point as well, but I never actually tried it, and the shop didn't last long), some with real cheese and pareve "meat" toppings (usually fake pepperoni).
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Lisa
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Kosher Subways have fake cheese. When I was in Israel, there was this one pizza place that used to cut veggie hotdogs into chunks and cook them with a little hot paprika (I guess that'd be cayenne pepper here in the US), and then use them as a pizza topping. Scrumptious!

Btw, I made cheese bourekas tonight, and they were the best bourekas I've had since I've been in the US.

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Shmuel
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quote:
Originally posted by Lisa:
hot paprika (I guess that'd be cayenne pepper here in the US)

Hot paprika does exist in the U.S.! I'm a fan of it. [Smile]
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Lisa
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Really? I've never seen it. Believe it or not, we still have some left from the large container we brought with us from Israel in 2001.
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rivka
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The Middle Eastern markets around here carry it (big surprise) and so do the spice specialty places. I prefer sweet paprika myself.
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Shmuel
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There was one time long ago when I accidentally used the hot paprika instead of the sweet paprika in making the family's chicken for Shabbos. This did not turn out well as far as most of the family was concerned, but I found it a bit of a revelation.
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Lisa
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I made paprika chicken with it, and even after using only half of what the recipe called for, my daughter couldn't eat it. But mmm... it was delicious!
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rivka
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Right. Neither of you is EVER allowed near my spice cabinet. [Razz]

Y'all are dangerous!

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Armoth
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My mom makes a dish with potatoes, salami, onions and paprika. She confused the paprika with the cinnamon. Fortunately, I'm one of those people who will eat anything with cinnamon on it. It was delicious.
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